/ Technology

This week in comments – hackers, fat taxes and porn

From a tax on fatty foods, to Sony’s TV “recall”, there’s been lots to talk about in the past seven days. But it was a debate on the blocking of pornography online that got many of you hot under the collar this week.

Sony TV “recall”

Sony’s offering free checks and repairs for Bravia LCD TVs it thinks are at risk of overheating. So far its service has kept up with demand, with Roy commenting:

‘I got onto Sony’s UK website this morning with no problem. I phoned my nearest [service centre]; they knew about the inspection alert, confirmed my TV was among those affected and booked an engineer to visit me on Monday morning. So far, excellent service.’

Would fat taxes make us healthier – or just poorer?

The Danes has introduced a tax on fatty foods. David doesn’t think it’ll solve anything:

‘Sadly, I don’t think a new tax is going to solve anything. People still drink and smoke despite the high taxation, because both activities are addictive and people will therefore make sacrifices to feed their addiction.’

But Cduffy disagrees:

‘I like the Danish tax on saturated fat products. We know in the end that too much consumption of saturated fat will cause health problems and cost the taxpayer. A tax “nudge” in the direction of healthy eating is not a bad thing at all.’

Hackers: should we condemn or embrace them?

Dave A thinks hacking is a complex topic and we shouldn’t tar hackers with the same brush:

‘There are many things that I use today that have been enabled by hackers. For example, DVD ripping software, my jailbroken iPhone that allows me to use my work sim card in my iPhone. Jailbreaking the iPhone, incidentally, is what spurred Apple to allow third party apps, and provided them inspiration to create the App Store.’

Morning madam, do you want to watch porn online?

Four ISPs are offering parents the ability to block porn online. Tweetiepooh backs the move:

‘I’d like to see porn banned at source. It’s not needed and feeds desires that are not good and healthy. However, it does exist and I don’t want my kids to get access to it.

‘On the more specifics of the topic, I have no problem if people wanting porn need to make an embarrassing call to their ISP.’

However, Emmiesmad! thinks the move is a step too far

‘I find it hard to believe that there are still people around today that are completely “anti-porn”. What is it they are afraid of and have they ever actually watched any??? I think the current provision that allows parents to block particular sites is appropriate and is all that is needed. The issue of the “sexualisation of children” is an interesting one, but I find it hard to make any correlation between that and the accessibility of porn.’

Family Man, our commenter of the week, explains how current tech can already help parents:

‘A good internet security package will allow you to control your child’s access to all kinds of unsavory material, not just porn. We have a 12-year-old son and an 11-year-old daughter. The security software can be programmed for their age and blocks suspicious material. If legitimate sites are blocked they can easily be listed as exceptions and unblocked. It’s not a problem for us.

‘However well meaning this initiative is, it doesn’t solve the problem of parents not taking proper responsibility for their children, so it is doomed to failure.’

Comments have been edited due to length, so make sure to read them in full on their relevant Convos (by clicking on the red title link).

Comments
Profile photo of kermit
Member

Children must be protected from online pornography AND VIOLENCE! Why is it that violence seems to be regarded as less abhorrent than pornography? Is it because violence isn’t rude, and rudeness is a far worse sin than brutality in our god-fearing society?

Whatever the answer, it’s about time that we reversed this skewed perspective and protected children from both, and allowed adults the freedom to make their own choices.