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Update: are you at breaking point with your broken broadband?

Fix Bad Broadband roadshow

The results of our nationwide broadband survey are in! Are you one of the many thousands putting up with bad broadband just because of where you live?

Update: 11 July 2017

Our Fix Bad Broadband roadshow has been a roaring success!

For the past two weeks, we’ve been visiting supporters in their hometowns hearing about their broadband problems. By taking our Fix Bad Broadband campaign on the road, we’ve been piloting whether these kind of events help us to reach more people, find new supporters and hear their powerful stories.

In Luton, for example, one new supporter told us that in his small village the internet connection was so bad that his business was failing to grow. It often took him well over an hour to check his emails as the connection would intermittently drop in and out. And sadly he told us the situation was causing him understandable financial hardship and emotional stress.

This is unfortunately not a unique story. The breadth of interest from communities and scale of concern from individuals continues to inspire us in our campaigning with you. We have many more stories like this and will be sharing some of them as the campaign ramps up.

To this end we also stopped at Parliament. During the day we spoke to 71 MPs about our Fix Bad Broadband campaign. They showed great enthusiasm to work with us and champion our broadband campaigning. Needless to say, we’re going to be continuing our conversations with MPs in an effort to get the voices of unhappy broadband customers heard in Parliament.

We also continued to promote our speed test tool during the roadshow. With 500,000 uses to date, we are building a clearer picture of problems across the UK, but we still need more in order to paint the fullest picture of the nation’s broadband health.

Thank you to all those who came out to see us. With your help we will improve the broadband service customers currently receive.

Original Convo: 27 June 2017

The UK’s best and worst broadband speeds have been revealed and the results make for very interesting reading.

The good, the bad and the almost there

Our speed test data analysis found the best-performing areas were Tamworth in the West Midlands, Reading, Adur in West Sussex, Enfield and Dundee City, in that order. However, those areas letting down residents as the worst-performing include the Orkney and Shetland Islands, the Highlands, Ryedale in Yorkshire and Purbeck in Dorset. Average tests in these areas were all below 10Mbps.

The government’s own Universal Service Obligation suggests that the minimum download speed anyone should be experiencing is 10Mbps. However, our research shows that 12 areas, broken down in our research by local authority, aren’t quite achieving even this benchmark.

Of course, you may very well assume that many of the worst performing areas are going to be rural and for the most part, you’d be right. However, many residents living in some of the most built-up areas also lag behind the national average of 17Mbps. For example, speed tests taken in the London Boroughs of Southwark, Westminster, Lambeth, Hackney and the City of London all fall behind this download speed; a figure determined from our research.

Here’s a map of the best and worst locations for broadband coverage in the UK based on speed tests. How does your area fair?

Receiving a good broadband service can often be something of a postcode lottery but, aside from complaining to your provider until you’re blue in the face or moving house, there are of couple of other things you can do about it.

First and foremost. you can take our broadband speed test and log your results with us so we can continue to build on our current research. With over 400,000 uses, our tool is helping us create a complete picture of the UK’s broadband health. Click the button below to submit your speed.

Take our speed test

After you’ve done that, the next thing you can do is to come visit us on our roadshow!

Fix Bad Broadband roadshow

Over the next two weeks we’re going to be taking our broadband campaign on the road and we’re inviting you to come and speak to our team about the problems you face getting online.


Come and visit us when our Fix Bad Broadband van rolls into a town near you.

Our crack team of broadband boffins will be on hand to offer tips on how you can improve your under-performing connection, share details about our Fix Bad Broadband campaign and invite you to get involved, and listen to your stories so we can go to government, internet service providers and regulators with the real-world problems faced by customers all across the country.

Is your broken broadband holding you back? Tell us how slow internet affects your life in the comments below, but of course we’d much rather meet our valued supporters face-to-face on the Fix Bad Broadband roadshow.

Comments
Guest
Adrian says:
4 July 2017

No trust in any of the alleged communication providers. We live a mile from the exchange and have a regular visit from BT technicians (17) in the last year. Their main policy is the old chestnut about distance from the exchange. Our broadband is a joke, and the phone line ain’t much better. On the plus side the mobile signal has been improving slowly over the last few years. So with a bit of luck will be able to bin the garbage landline and just go mobile. Will need to invest in a large umbrella for those days when I will have to do the Vodafone boogie in the garden looking for my G. Oddly enough signal and broadband work perfectly for junk calls/texts and spam.

Guest

Adrian I find it hard to believe that if you are a mile from the exchange , which means an even shorter distance from the cabinet that your broadband is so slow -less than 5Mbps , there is something wrong with this type of engineering logic , there must be other factors involved . As far as your Vodaphone signal is concerned thats Vodaphone,s problem and the positioning of their mast and signal strength. Could you provide some more data and information please ?

Guest
Colin RF Dean says:
5 July 2017

I live 2and half miles from the exchange and 2and half miles from the cabinet the cabinet that supplies me is just outside the door of the exchange but i cant complain I get on average 3to 4 Mbps and living in the middle of nowhere is very nice and I dont think I we stand much chance of ever seeing fibre except in our breakfast cereal lol

Guest

Thats actually not bad for the distance you quote Colin , your line must be good and so must your internal wiring /router etc.

Guest
Philip says:
6 July 2017

What speeds ????
Some people have BT’s Emergency Aluminium cabling, put down in the 1970’s. This was due to unavailability of copper wiring from South Africa, due to a dispute with the South Africans at the time.
It is a good phone line, but of course, we don’t have any internet access. There are no signals, because the alumimum in not compatible with the internet.
BT won’t change these lines without cost, and they do cost. It would be nice if they offered free compatible internet wiring
It doesn’t matter to us personally, because we are happy using a 3 dongle instead.
We live in the Lincolnshire Wolds. A lot of houses here have alumium.
So people with slow internet speeds are very lucky. Some people don’t get the internet at all!

Guest
Michael Nicholson says:
6 July 2017

When your broadband test makes my download and upload speeds about the same (10 mb/sec) and when I test other broad band speed test systems which give me download speeds 4x the speed that you estimate I tend to suspect that you are wrong.

Guest

Got to agree Michael something far wrong here. Telephone companies set the upload speed to their requirements,download is faster as thats what customers want unless you are a business where you need a fast upload speed .A clue here is that if a speed tester uses Flash (or equivalent ) then 30 % of the SLOWEST packets transferred will NOT count , if in doubt use a HTML5 tester .

Guest
Philip says:
6 July 2017

What speeds???
Some people have BT’s Emergency Aluminium cabling, put down in the 1970’s. This was due to unavailability of copper wiring from South Africa, due to a dispute with the South Africans at the time.
It is a good phone line, but of course, we don’t have any internet access. There are no signals, because the alumimum in not compatible with the internet.
BT won’t change these lines without cost, and they do cost.
It doesn’t matter to us personally, because we are happy using a 3 dongle instead.
We live in the Lincolnshire Wolds. A lot of houses here have alumium.
So people with slow internet speeds are very lucky. Some people don’t get the internet at all!