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EE announces 3.3% price rise – everything you never wanted

EE logo

EE, ‘the new network for your digital life’, has announced a price rise for Orange and T-Mobile customers locked into fixed monthly plans. It might be a new network, but it’s the same old story.

Citing ‘rising business costs’ EE is increasing prices by 3.3% for its Orange and T-Mobile customers. We estimate this will add 79p a month to a typical fixed mobile contract, meaning customers will collectively pay almost £52m extra per year due to the price rise. Interestingly, EE customers won’t be affected.

The timing is somewhat apt, considering we were last night on Britain’s Secret Shoppers talking about price rises on fixed contracts from Vodafone, O2, Three Mobile, Orange and T-Mobile.

EE’s price rise for Orange and T-Mobile customers

And the wait for the latest price rise is almost over – Orange customers will be hit on 10 April and T-Mobile customers will be affected from 9 May. Both Orange and T-Mobile customers on fixed contracts were hit by similar price increases last year. This is because there’s a term hidden away in their contracts that allow for price rises every 12 months as long as the increase is below the current RPI rate of inflation.

Not all Orange and T-Mobile customers will be affected. At least, not straight away. There’s a six month price freeze for certain Orange and T-Mobile customers.

EE will be contacting affected customers by letter from today, giving them the required 30 days notice of the changes. EE will also be amending its marketing materials to reflect the possibility of price rises, although that’s not much help for existing customers.

Paying extra to fix your monthly plan

So, what can you do about it? As with all other price rises from the major mobile providers, you won’t be able to cancel without paying a hefty penalty, usually the remaining monthly payments on your contract.

For customers who want to avoid the price rise, from 10 April EE will be offering customers a new bolt on called ‘Fix Your Monthly Plan’.

The Fix Your Monthly Plan bolt on (‘the first of its kind in the industry’) will cost between 50p and £2 per month depending on your current line rental. I’d imagine you’ll agree that forcing customers to pay extra to enjoy a fixed price contract when they thought it was fixed in the first place, is outrageous.

And it all sounds incredibly complex. So complicated that EE will have a calculator on its website for customers to work out how much extra they’ll have to pay. All in all, this latest price rise is just further evidence that Ofcom has to step in and change the rules.

Fixed should mean fixed and if it doesn’t, you should be able to leave your contract without penalty. Full stop.

[UPDATE 7 March 2013] – There’s just one week to go before Ofcom closes its consultation into price rises during fixed contracts. Have your say by voting in our poll and watch our new Fixed Means Fixed video:

Comments
Guest
Fishy says:
11 March 2013

I have just spent a week in Dorset, and most of the time had no signal what so ever, any chance of a refund EE?
No I doubt it, this greedy self opinionated company just gets worse, and what a cheek to rename yourself “Everything Everywhere” the coverage is worse than ever, more like Nothing Nowhere”!

Guest
Mostafa says:
3 May 2013

I have been saying nothing nowhere since i heard of them I knew it was going to be a joke letting one company own two networks,
Orange has always been a fantastic network but since they joined force with the shi##%st network in the uk they have gone downhill

Guest

These companies are taking the wee wee. I say vote with your feet and go to another provider, and if your company uses EE, then encourage them to leave! they don’t like loosing big Company accounts.

Guest
Ian says:
11 March 2013

This price increase comes after a long period of frustration with the Orange account management software. I brought my mobile number from another provider ok but orange were completely unable to recognise my number on the ‘Your Orange’ app or web site. It took 6 months to get it fixed! Now this bunch of technology amateurs have the gall to put their prices up.

When my 24 month agreement is up, I’m off.

Profile photo of wavechange
Guest

I’m confused. Which? launched the Fixed Means Fixed campaign, encouraging us to oppose price rises during the period of a contract, and this achieved a lot of support.

The goal posts seem to have moved now that Which? has published its video asking for support for customers to be allowed to leave their contract without penalty if they are faced with a price rise. This may be the best of the options that Ofcom is currently suggesting, but I think we should carry on fighting for Fixed Means Fixed.

The contracts we are discussing usually provide a ‘free’ phone. What would happen to that phone if it became possible to leave without penalty if there was a price rise?

Please can we go back to Fixed Means Fixed – an excellent simple campaign?

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Guest

Hi Wavechange, thanks for the comment.

We’re still very much on the same course – we think fixed should mean fixed. We still think that the price and all other features of a contract (minutes, data etc) should stay fixed from the day it’s agreed until the end of that agreement. If providers don’t want to keep their end of the bargain and prices do change they have basically broken the contract – this means you should be able to legally leave without having to pay an exit penalty. If this is enforced it’s also likely that providers won’t put their prices up as the risk of losing customers will be too large.

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Guest

Thanks Patrick. Unless we win the argument, other (non-phone) service providers could introduce clauses that allow them to apply similar price rises during contracts.

Guest
Charles says:
11 March 2013

Who says Dick Turpin is dead. He’s alive and kicking with the stealth increases to bills (on a fixed contract) for Mobile phones.

Guest
zarar says:
15 March 2013

I have orange. I phone 07973100123 from a landline so i do not have to pay orange to access my voicemail.

Once i dailed 07973100123, typed my mobiole number and pin then i listern to the message. I have free minutes from my landline to call mobile phone numbers.

I have found out Ornage have still been chareging me to access my answer machine. what a con and rip off

Guest
Ryan says:
15 March 2013

Where the the T&C stating they can do this? I can’t find them anywhere.
No way am I allowing them to get away with this, even if my credit rating takes a hit. Someone has to take a stand against these robbing gits.

Guest
Fishy says:
15 March 2013

Well my wife has had her official letter advising her of the price rise, her contract is up in October, my contract is up in April, of course no letter received about any price rises, but they have blown it I have a PAC code to move to a better deal!

Guest
Dkeog says:
11 April 2014

I’m with Three and they state they don’t put prices up mid contract I’ve been with the 15 months and not seen one, wife on tmobile and this is her 2nd in 16 month I will be moving wife to Three when she can,

And still they will sell the some deal with out the price increase

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Guest

Three have certainly put up their prices in the past – see the Coversation dated 21 May 2012. Hopefully they will continue to play fair.

Guest
Dkeog says:
11 April 2014

From 2012 they put in contract there will be no mid contract price rise

Profile photo of wavechange
Guest

I had forgotten that. Perhaps they will pick up customers from the companies that are continuing to treat their customers unfairly.

Guest
Charles says:
15 March 2013

HERE HERE

Les

Guest
ex-Orange employee says:
16 March 2013

I’m not surprised this has happened in the slightest. I personally quit after nearly 10 years with this company due to reasons just like this. Sadly not sure I can go into detail here! (did not agree with selling tactics one bit!)

This is the second time they have increased tariff’s and they even tried it on once with changing the price of calls mid term. This you were able to cancel with, however it does state in the T&C’s section 4.3.1 which you can find on the Orange website, that they can do this. Only by people kicking up about it and fighting them are they likely to stop.

Sadly it’s all down to making more and more money now days. Not about the customer service they ONCE gave.

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Guest

I rarely get surprised these days but to charge extra to keep a “fixed price” contract fixed really takes the biscuit. At least Vodafone (who I am with not least as they are the only company with a decent signal where I live and have Suresignal) did not do that. EE make Ryanair look good.

Lets hope OFCOM do the right thing.

Guest
Eddie_b says:
19 April 2013

I wouldn’t be so sure Dermot. My daughter has a 24 month Vodaphone contract which increased without any notification after 2 months!

I have just got of the phone with t-mobile about my own mid contract rise and have been refunded the difference to the end of the contract which was only a few months but it’s the principle of course

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Guest

I think what’s needed is a solicitor to take on the case for thousands of customers to argue the legalities of changing the fixed price contract mid term. Surely when you sign an agreement to pay a fixed price for a fixed term there must be legality issues with changing the agreement/contract?
When you sign an agreement/contract to pay a certain amount over 24 months it should stay the same for those 24 months and if not then you should be allowed to leave.
It’s definately morally wrong and unfair!

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Guest

I have today joined the band of brothers being ripped off by T-Mobile. My FIXED Price contract is increasing by 3.3%. We need a resolution that turns this practice against the mobile companies. Once we have one firm that GUARANTEES that FIXED means FIXED, then everyone should move their business to that firm. The others will then follow.

Guest
DampLondon says:
5 April 2013

For me though, although not a breach of and legal contract, it is a breach of trust and good will – to say that this rise is because of inflation makes no sense as that should have been factered into 1 or 2 year contract – am I paying the price for their incompetence? Legal contract aside, my ethical and goodwill contract with EE has been breached, just because something is legal doesn’t make it ethically correct. What makes this even more outragous is that all European operators were recently in trouble with the EU and told to lower their fees – and what does EE do? Raises its prices!

So I cancelled my contract with them today and will move to GiffGaff (who use the excellent O2 network) and despite having to buy out my contract, it still works out cheaper than EE – and GiffGaff seem to still want to have happy customers unlike t-mobile who I feel have violated my trust and seem to make no apology at all (not that I expected one).

Just vote with your feet and go elsewhere and wait the OFCOM damnation of this unethical practise soon.

Guest
Paul Coates says:
5 April 2013

This is as bad as the misspelling of PPI. The stores don’t mention the possibility of increasing the rentals and in my case the lady at EE in Milton Keynes verbally told me that the price was fixed, she even wrote the costs down on the contract. In addition, I pay £26pm (£21.47 + vat) and my increase is £1.18. which is more than the 3.3 percent RPI increase in the T Mobile letter.

Guest
Anna Patterson says:
7 April 2013

T-Mobile are increasing prices by 3.3%, stating they have used the Retail Price Index, currently at 3.3%. This rate is incorrect; the current figure on the ONS website is 3.2%.

Clause 7.2.3 of T-Mobile’s terms and conditions allows the customer to terminate the agreement within the minimum term without having to pay a cancellation charge if: “The change that We gave you Written Notice of in point 7.1.4 is an increase in Your Price Plan Charge (as a percentage) higher than any increase in the Retail Price Index (also calculated as a percentage) for the 12 months before the month in which We send You Written Notice and You give Us notice to immediately cancel this Agreement before the change takes effect. (7.2.3.3)”.

As the price increase is higher than than the current RPI percentage rate, you are entitled to terminate the contract without penalty, provided the written notice received from T-Mobile is dated April 2013.

Guest
Supakreef says:
9 April 2013

I’ve been reading over clause 7.2.3 and was wondering… when they state “….for the 12 months before the month in which we send you written notice …”. If I got my notice dated April 2013, is it the RPI published in March 2013 (the month before my notice), or is it the March figure which will only be published on 16 April?

Also … the part saying “… higher that any increase in the RPI …” does this not allow them to use the highest rate over the last 12 months? …or is the rate calculated as a percentage of all the rates published over the last 12 months?

Guest
Anna Patterson says:
11 April 2013

It’s the RPI rate in the month before the written notice is sent, so if sent in April, it’s the 3.2% figure published in March that is relevant. I think the reference to 12 months is because the current RPI rate covers the previous 12 month period and doesn’t mean T-Mobile can cherry pick the highest RPI in the previous 12 months! It can’t be the March figure, because as you’ve pointed out, this isn’t due to be released until 19 April.

T-Mobile’s letter states the increase is due to inflation, “currently” at 3.3%, and this is what they have based their increase on. If the letters had been sent on 31 March then, yes, 3.3% would be the current figure, as this was the RPI rate released the month before, in February. However, the price increase for a letter dated April should be no more than 3.2%; otherwise clause 7.2.3.3 gives the customer the right to cancel without penalty.

Guest
Lost24 says:
10 April 2013

Stung twice – daughter is on UFIX for 12 months – that’s going up and I’m with Orange on a 24 month contract and that’s going up – not even 12 months in……. Not fair!!

Guest

I renewed my contract in April 12 using my old tariff (when I upgraded) – it is an 18 month contract. I have just received a letter from T-Mobile saying that my Monthly plan is going up from £26.47/m to £32.80/m By my maths that is a 24% increase. When you look at the “FAQ’s” on the back of the letter under the “Why is it necessary to raise prices” it says that it is because of inflation and quotes that at 3.3%!!!!! I also note that they are really underhand in the question about whether I can cancel. My understanding is I can give notice with no penalties but they allude to there being a charge in an attempt to put you off that course of action!!!

Guest
Supakreef says:
12 April 2013

Just send them a letter giving notice under section 7.2.3.3. (Will play it by the book and give notice in writing delivered by recorded mail). They do not mention the actual percentage increase on the letter, but if you work it out (and verify using their online calculator, the percentage increase seems to be 3.25% across the board… still above 3.2% 🙂 ….

Guest
pinkskink says:
13 April 2013

We have two 24 month ‘FIXED’ mobile contracts; one with Orange and the other with Tmobile.
In 2011 both companies raised their monthly tariffs and with EE taking over both are rising AGAIN.
Stung twice.
The contracts finish in a few of months and we won’t be renewing… thanks very much.
They do so because they can, and are allowed to get away with it.
Laughing all the way to the bank.

Guest
Emma says:
15 April 2013

EE pushed my mobile bill up by 51p (which, for me, is a lot of money). My bill has gone from £21.50 a month, to £22.01. I wish I could cancel it, but I’m on a 12 month plan and can’t cancel until July. I won’t be taking out another contract with them in the near future.

Guest
Chris says:
17 April 2013

i’ve been with Orange since it was a pip, but no reward for loyalty. The signal is so poor at home in Axminster that half the time the calls don’t get through or there is no service to call out. Orange’s solution is to tell me to switch the phone to 2G and then they have the cheek to put the price up on this pathetic service. In a rare moment of weakness I signed up a 2 year contract and am locked in till November, paying 28 pounds a month for a phone I rarely use – and I never use data. The best solution would be for Ofcom to ban contracts all together in favour of rolling month by month payments. If Plusnet can offer this for home phone and broadband why cant mobile providers? If any do they will get my business once in December.

Guest
Fishy says:
17 April 2013

Chris
Phone Orange tell them that the signal strength at home is unacceptable (as it is all around that area I know this from staying at Broadwindsor), and demand they send you a “Signalbox”.
This is a little box you plug into your broadband router that turns it into a mini mobile phone transmitter, you will then get full signal around your home.

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Guest

you sumed it all pr ORANGE bullying people again

Guest
Peter says:
22 April 2013

As well as being unimpressed by orange/EE’s price hike only weeks in to my new contract, I was surprised to find that the 10.50 a month deal I had taken out would be 15.50 a month after a year. That was certain something that wasn’t made clear until after I’d taken out the contract. I’ve been with Orange for many years but these dodgey deals are making me look at other options.

Guest
Steve says:
30 May 2013

To the best of my knowledge (but sadly not provable) I hadn’t even been notified of the increase so only saw it while trying to work out why my direct debit had gone up.

But never mind the 3.3% rise on the tariff – I also saw that the Orange Care (really don’t know why I still have it to be honest, not now the phone is 22 months old anyway, cancelling it will be on my list for tomorrow!) had gone from £6 to £7.99 – that’s a whopping 33% increase, certainly way above RPI!

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Guest

Ive had 2 price rises from t-mobile during the life of my latest contract .The first was less than 6 weeks into my contract . When I complained to customer service they said if I paid them £600 I could cancel my contract. Suffice to say I am nearly out of contract and will take the greatest of pleasure in telling them to shove their upgrade were the sun doesnt shine. I complained to OFCOM they sympathised but its my fault for not reading the fine print. I think OFCOM should be disbanded .If this isnt a case of mis-selling I dont know what is . Ofcom is a waste of taxpayers money

Guest
Elbert says:
5 August 2013

OFCOM may not do anything, but I suggest you go to CISAS instead if you made a complaint to T-Mobile before the price rise came into effect. Like I posted before, T-Mobile got their price rise wrong and the increase were more than the RPI allowed. T-Mobile may not agree with it, but CISAS did agree with me and ruled in my favour. This mean that T-Mobile has been told to refund all my line rental back to the original complaint date and immediatly give me my PAC code without any cancellation or other charges. And I’m not the only one who has won their case .. there are hundreds of people.

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Guest

Took out a simm only contract for myself and wife at £8 each pcm (special offer should have been £15.50pcm). Now in month 6 and despite phoning each month to query charges Orange still cannot explain the monthly bill. For the first 3 months they tried charging me the full amount and each time I phoned (a phillipines call centre) they ‘adjusted’ the charges but the amounts although only slightly more than the agreed £15.50 could never be explained. I am pretty sure that I have been charged for listening to voicemail calls that I never made. How can they get away with not being able to explain the bill? Vodaphone not much better. They rely on you wearying of phoning and complaining, the Regulator is about as much use as a chocolate teapot in the midday sun in the middle of Daarjeeling!!!

Guest
Graham Hookham says:
11 September 2013

I’ve had to endure price increases mid contract on 3 different occasions now. I took my case to Offcom and they advised that I would have to prove that the increase would cause material deprivation to me and my household (Ie. we would no longer be able to afford to eat). If I successfully proved this I would have grounds to be released from my contract.

This is ridiculous, if half way through my contract I decided that due to economic conditions I could only pay 80% of my bill they would come down on my like a tonne of bricks. Why then can they claim the economic climate has forced them to increase prices and we HAVE to pay up with no scope of being let out of our contracts.

I’m 100% for fixed should mean fixed!

Guest
Dkeog says:
11 April 2014

I’m with Three and they state they don’t put prices up mid contract I’ve been with the 15 months and not seen one, wife on tmobile and this is her 2nd in 16 month I will be moving wife to Three when she can,

And still they will sell the some deal with out the price increase

Guest
Richard says:
24 April 2014

Utterly disgraceful behaviour from these people, am currently trying to cancel an account and having to use a landline due to zero reception as usual, follow the electronic voice trail only to be cut off with a ‘Sorry we can’t connect you to a customer service representative at this time, please call later goodbye…’ Click. On pay monthly so just chucking the SIM card into the stove. Been with them for ages and all I get is poor service and huge bills. Waste of space, feel sorry for the poor sods stuck on lengthy contracts.