/ Technology

Do you still use your landline?

Landline or mobile

Do you still use your landline at home to make calls – or are you one of the growing number happy to rely on a mobile?

In our house, it sometimes seems that the only calls we get on our landline these days are from people trying to sell us something or fool us into falling for some scam.

Could it be that the personal phone call is really going the way of the personal handwritten letter?

It seems some households are starting to think this way.

The percentage of UK households with a landline has fallen gradually from 95% in 2000 to 88% in 2012, while the percentage of mobile-only homes rose from 10% in 2006 to 15% in the first quarter of 2015.

Of course that means the vast majority of us still have a home phone. But is it really little more than an ornament gathering dust?

Earlier this year, culture minister Ed Vaizey even suggested that householders signing up for broadband packages could be exempted from the rental charge on their landline if they don’t use it.

One in five homeowners don’t make fixed-line calls, but have to pay for landline connections.

The case for mobile phones

Those who love their mobile might point to their convenience and to the great variety of things you can do with them.

Mobiles phones have started to define the daily life of many, if not most, adults in the UK. We use them to plan out our days, weeks, months and years, to stay in contact, to browse the internet, and exchange goods and services. In short, they’ve become far more than just phones.

Not surprising then, that users worldwide are forecast to reach 4.77 billion by 2017.

The case for a landline

For a start, smartphones run out of battery incredibly quickly – landlines don’t. And you don’t have to update the landline phone’s software every other month in case its operating speed slows to a crawl.

Another factor that might save the landline from becoming a technical dinosaur is that most broadband providers use a copper wire telephone network to deliver an internet connection to your home. And this requires an active phone line.

Some people also like to keep a landline in case they need to make an emergency call and fear that their smartphone will have run out of batteries.

How often do you use your landline to make calls?

At least once a day (40%, 929 Votes)

A few times a week (33%, 778 Votes)

Rarely (20%, 474 Votes)

Never (6%, 130 Votes)

I don't have a landline (2%, 39 Votes)

Total Voters: 2,350

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Perhaps, the home phone is safe for now, but how often do you use yours? Has it had its day or do you find it’s still a vital lifeline?

Comments
Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Still being stopped from posting Patrick . Especially on things that look a bit controversial.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Try again — second go– It seems to be the latest trend to to promote wi-fi only . This is why underground cables will NOT go out of fashion . Every fire alarm system that is not local is connected via underground cable to a central control be it private of council fire department . Every BB department store is connected under the ground to a central control that liaises with the Police to display photos/ criminal information on shop lifters etc . Every Nuclear power station is connected under the ground to a government department and contrary to public information every department of our Armed Forces is connected under the ground to HMG because satellites can be shot down and a second SECURE line of communication is vital . Government “Hot LInes ” are connected under the ground secretly . There is a lot more I can add but think on -just imagine if they were all wi-fi – it doesnt bear thinking .

Profile photo of richjenn14
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When Mobile calls don’t drop out at random due to goodness only knows what it might be a starter. But for those of us who want to make reliable calls Mobile is a constant nuisance, and the signal seems to be getting WORSE rather than better.
Hmmm…

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Your right richjenn14= mobile towers have only short distance of transmissions between them as you move from one cell to another to cover the whole country will cost a lot of money so ,as more and more of the population buy cell-net phones the existing towers get swamped with data and overload . Answer build a lot more towers and bigger transmitting data transmitters but then we are back to the “who pays ” situation just like 100 % fast broadband not yet achievable due to “who pays “

Member
Ann Brown says:
10 July 2016

I like my land-line phone for the simple reason the handset is more comfortable to hold, mobiles and cordless phones ie ones that you can take with you around the house, tend to slip up the side of ny head and I cannot hear properly. To explain all this I am 85!!!

Profile photo of John Ward
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I so agree with your comment Ann. My landline telephone handset not only has the microphone where my mouth is and the speaker next to my ear but I can grip it in the fold of my neck while I go through papers or write notes. Dialling is also so much easier. Mobiles have their good points but only when on the move.

Member
David Seale says:
10 July 2016

I Can’t use mobile phones. I’ve tried & tried. I can switch it on after 3 or 4 attempts. It can take me about ten minutes to make a call on a mobile. I now just keep one in the car for emergencies.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

David I tried the low number of help websites including the standard wikhow and they were not very simple with modern phone layout . So I found a wiki one that will do although its for an iPhone it still applies and is nicely laid out in colour . The website is== wikihow.com/Make-Phone-Calls-With-the-iPhone-4–(remember to scroll DOWN ).

Member
Linda Saunders says:
19 July 2016

My husband is exactly the same. We both only use mobiles for emergencies or contacting each other at pre-arranged times but usually it is me ringing him to our landline.

Profile photo of wavechange
Member

David – There are simple mobile phones for those who struggle with standard models. Doro is the only company I am aware of, but there may be others.

Member
Suzie says:
10 July 2016

Without a landline I would be unable to make calls as I do not have mobile reception.
I am also in the 5% that will not get fibre broadband in the foreseeable future.
Some of the joys of living in the countryside.

Member
Wimbledon says:
10 July 2016

I have a landline for broadband internet. Otherwise no use for it. Mobile package has plenty of minutes and data included. Phone is on you all the time and no need to remember any numbers. Can use a Bluetooth headset or speaker if doing something else too. Annoying how line rental keeps on climbing. And why for fibre broadband do they include telephone line rental??

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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Wimbledon -Murray won didnt he ? anyway you pay maintenance for the upkeep for the underground cable and exchange equipment as well as your overhead wiring fibre or no fibre . IF you dont see rental on some packages it is because they have included it in the price of the package . Bad weather brings down overhead wiring , water gets into underground cable , builders dig up telephone cable with JCB,s etc etc this has to be repaired or would you like a few £!00 bill every so often or if you live in the country and 2 miles of wiring come down £500- £2000 ? Its nice when you have fast 4G or even faster 5 G but 100,s of 1000,s dont and cant use all those facilities you use .

Member
Steve D says:
11 July 2016

I was thinking of getting rid of my Virgin landline home phone the last time our Virgin contract came to an end as we rarely seem to use our landline these days! The only incoming calls we seem to get are from nuisance callers or people trying to sell something. The Virgin landline line rental is now £17.99 per month that’s £215.88 per year for something we don’t really use much.
You can get a Virgin broadband and TV package without the landline but the pricing of the package without the landline was nearly as expensive as the package with the landline included??? Which seemed strange …
They offered me a discount for 12 months if I stayed on a Landline, Broadband and TV package! Surely it would make sense to give people the option of a TV and Broadband package without having to have the landline at a reasonable price… I think they are just happy charging people £17.99 per month for the privilege of your landline phone just sitting there and gathering dust! : (

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Steve -Virgin make a good bit of money out of their landline provision thats why there is little difference in the package . Their philosophy is that you might use it in the future and your right they are happy charging you for it –and so are the shareholders.

Member
Mike says:
11 July 2016

1. I need it for broadband connection. 2. There is no mobile network which provides a consistent, quality connection + often too bad for internet or sending picture messages. I live only 5 minutes from the town centre and on a higher level.

Profile photo of stevegs
Member

As others have said, mobile coverage in some parts of the country is patchy – notably rural Herefordshire! I don’t carry my mobile around with me in the house, so if someone rings me on it when it’s in another room, I often miss the call. I have a 4-station cordless landline system – only its base station needs to be near a phone line so I can have others dotted about the house – I’ve even modified one sub-station’s charger to work off the solar-charged battery system in my summerhouse, which is completely off-grid and about 20m from the house. So I’m always within earshot and easy reach of one of these wherever I am in the house or garden.

Add to this, most landline phone companies charge silly amounts to ring a mobile – I’m not prepared to have my technophobic elderly relatives overcharged to ring me – and I need the landline for broadband.

Perhaps I’m old-fashioned, but when I was in business, I thought any outfit that only gave a mobile number was a bit ‘Mickey Mouse’ – no proper premises etc.

Finally, the cordless phones live in their charging holsters and are therefore always available. The mobile’s battery is always going flat – worse still for so-called ‘smartphones’ – that’s why I still have my old builder’s Nokia 3330….

Member
Ian says:
11 July 2016

Inclusive calls from landlines to mobile numbers is now ‘a thing’.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Ian-Seemingly inclusive calls to mobile numbers is NOT the “thing ” with BT yet . i just checked my BT plan which is the TOP plan Infinity 2 etc etc and it is =half price calls/minute rate to mobiles .

Member
Ian says:
12 July 2016

BT includes calls to mobiles numbers on business plans, but not yet on residential plans. They are far behind Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media.

Sky’s anytime deal includes calls to UK mobile numbers as standard.
TalkTalk offers an inexpensive add-on for making calls to mobile numbers.
Virgin Media offers an expensive call plan that covers calls to UK mobile numbers as well as calls to a variety of international destinations.
BT is now the odd one out in still charging a per-minute rate for calls to UK mobile numbers.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Thanks for that Ian.

Member
JC says:
11 July 2016

The line quality is why I keep the landline going. Sometimes the mobile signal is so bad I have to call back on the landline.

Member
Alan says:
11 July 2016

As several people have said already those of us living in the countryside ( less than 4 miles outside of a town mind you!) have to suffer the problems of totally rubbish broadband speeds and also virtually nil mobile phone signal (unless you want to hang out of the window waving your mobile around). So for millions of us the landline is invaluable and will be for a long time yet as the telecoms industry is only interested in the urban areas.

Member
Philip Knight says:
11 July 2016

Agree with Alan. Only one network and that is unreliable. Long live landlines

Member
John says:
12 July 2016

Wouldn’t be without a landline and landline based phone. Also keep one old-style wired phone on the landline, just in case the battery dependent cordless ones fail!

Member
Julie Lamont says:
12 July 2016

If you live in rural areas the chances are you have very little or NO mobile connection! It’s alright for those of you living in towns and cities but vast areas of the country do not have reliable mobile connection and we rely on our landlines.
don’t have an emergency in the countryside – BT has removed nearly all phoneboxes despite knowing there is no reliable phone communication in an emergency!

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Julie -I get your point on the removal of phone boxes by BT . It depends on the use made in each box whether it is kept or not and as those boxes are usually in isolated positions a case has to be made to petition BT by the local population to keep them as they represent a major loss of revenue to BT in maintenance due to distances from the exchange . No other companies want to take them over . Many councils/villages have kicked up a fuss and managed to keep them but mobile phones have hit them hard . That mobile reception isnt good in outlying areas is down to all the private companies not willing to install cell-net masts universally . BT has realised it has some loyalty to the public by keeping and maintaining boxes in far out areas and villages of architectural importance and spacing them out maybe one large village taking care of several smaller communities round about . But BT is a private company and not the old GPO where money wasnt an object no matter where you lived . Those days are gone for good .

Member
Colin Suter says:
13 July 2016

Moving to the sticks but do not see the point of landline. I always have my iPhone in my pocket wherever I am – indoors or out.
Would rather pay for broadband on its own and have an aerial which automatically switches my cellphone to WiFi if 3G signal fails. I understand that this can be done but most phone providers are unhelpful in providing this.
Why?

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

If you read many of the previous posts Colin you will find when you move to the “sticks ” -aka countryside that your cellnet service will suffer a great loss and as I have said previously try downloading 4 G of films etc without landline -and wait -and wait and say BT wi-fi that depends on the population who have that service okay in a town etc closely together but not in a rural area of farming small villages etc . 3G wont “hack it ” in the countryside – if you can get a signal just look at the previous 50 posts to find other posters complaining of loss of signal due to trees distance etc cell net structure is what it sounds cells(towers ) joined together a short distance apart and when they reach the countryside ? the investment comes to an end (no profit ) . You could try something illegal but I am not going to help you there. Is the switch an auto wi-fi 3G data switch this type of thing isnt always approved by companies for various technical reasons, but in the country ?? .

Member
Phil says:
14 July 2016

” Moving to the sticks but do not see the point of landline. ”

You will…

Member
Robert says:
14 July 2016

The fixed-line phone comes into its own in two situations for us. First of all (and most relevant), it’s significantly cheaper to phone relatives abroad. Secondly, on an unmetered tariff, it reduces arguments when the teenagers want to talk to their friends…

Member
Stephen says:
15 July 2016

For many people the copper telephone line is either the only way they can get wired internet access or it is the last part of the connection to the home (fibre optic then the copper telephone line).

This has to be paid for; without it no wired internet (unless you have fibre to the home). Presumably ISP’s make more money by bundling a telephone service with the copper wire than simply charging the rent for it. At least one ISP will offer you the option of renting just the copper line without a phone service.

The issue here is that ISP’s try to confuse pricing by offering broadband deals with the copper line/phone rental a separate a item. It is about time OFCOM sorted something out here. I doubt it would mean lower prices overall but it would be more transparent.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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Stephen, I agree with the first part.

However, when you take a broadband deal it may be priced for different options – phone packages such as weekends, all day, international, mobiles – and broadband downloads, limited or unlimited, all at different prices. The line rental will be a single price, whichever plan you want. Therefore it does seem sensible to price that separately.

As long as the line rental and the bb package prices are clearly shown I see that as preferable, Bundling them together reduces transparency in my view.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

I agree malcolm .

Member
Jacqui Knibbs says:
16 July 2016

Some of us still have no mobile phone coverage at home! So it is still very much an essential as I dislike having to travel 2 miles to find reliable reception for a mobile.

Member
clive lewis says:
16 July 2016

My landline is essential for two reasons. First is I cannot get a signal for my mobile, second is that another family member cannot, for health reasons, use a mobile or cordless phone.

Member
Bill says:
18 July 2016

I really resent being forced to pay BT’s rip-off landline charge simply to use the Internet with another company.

Profile photo of wavechange
Member

It is not fair to expect anyone who does not use a landline to contribute to the cost of the telephone exchange. On the other hand, the copper or fibre cable has to be maintained, as do the servers needed to provide internet access.

I suggest that users of broadband and landline phone pay a smaller charge to cover these fixed costs and a discount is given to users of both services.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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Those who use a landline phone service plus broadband would then pay more, those who use phone only or broadband only would then pay less. Total revenue would be maintained.

If you have to have a phone number – and therefore access to the landline phone system for at least incoming call – simply to receive a broadband service you would need to pay the full rental because, as all are not honest, the system would be abused. 🙁

Profile photo of wavechange
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I have suggested that those who use both services should receive a discount.

Elsewhere we have been told that it is possible to block phone lines, which would stop broadband-only customers from making or receiving phone calls. If you have evidence that broadband-only users are able to use the phone service, I would like to see evidence.

Those who don’t use a landline phone are having to pay for the telephone exchange etc. That is wrong.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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Previously Duncan has said you need a phone number for a broadband service (4 July). Until that changes the system would be open to abuse.

You say those who use both services should receive a discount? Surely, if broadband can be totally separated from a phone system, those who use both services would pay the most, not receive a discount. If you reduce the cost to users of a single system then those who use both would end up paying more to maintain revenue.

Profile photo of wavechange
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It would be a discount compared with the total for buying broadband and landline phone separately.

If you lived in an area that did not have mains gas, I’m sure you would not want to contribute to the fixed costs of providing gas supplies for everyone that has mains gas.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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If there is a gas service (like a phone line) to my house I will pay a charge for it even if I don’t use it. You have the gas disconnected to avoid the charge.

I think we have covered this topic. When BT change their system so you do not need a phone number for broadband then the pricing structure can be altered in ways that are fair to all (I hope). 🙂

Profile photo of wavechange
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There are many people who are happy to use a mobile phone for all calls and they want fair charges for their broadband service. Obviously you can have gas disconnected if you don’t use it, but there is an urgent need for lower charges for those who just use broadband.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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According to the poll above:
2069 responded.
98.5% have a landline
93% use it to make and receive calls.
Damned statistics.

Profile photo of wavechange
Member

Perhaps we are over-represented with old blokes, Malcolm. Students represent a fair proportion of the adult population and most of them don’t use landline phones, exceptions being mature students living in their own home and those living with their parents.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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Dont think so wavechange – UK population now around 65 million , number of students in the UK , including foreign ,non resident approx 2.2 million , so that equals approx 4 % of population . Data from 2014/5 figures of the UK Council for International Student Affairs .

Profile photo of malcolm r
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“Ofcom say “The majority of UK households (80%) used both fixed and mobile telephony services “. Many students are literally mobile, without a permanent residence where they would rent a landline. So unsurprising.

The number of residential landlines increase slightly from 23 million in 2013 to 23.5 million in 2014. And of course it is a household, representing a number of people, that usually rents a landline. So this represents lot more potential users.

Profile photo of wavechange
Member

It’s equally unsurprising that many people use a landline phone as well as a mobile phone, since they have to pay for the service. I expect that many would be happy to give up their landline phone in return for a lower tariff for broadband.

I’m happy to have both a landline and a mobile phone. What pushed me to get a mobile phone contract was the increasing number of contacts who don’t have landline phones – not just personal users but people who move between two or more offices in their work.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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Fixed voice call minutes were 80 billion compared with mobile 137 billion. Many mobile minutes will be used when you are not at home. 40% (last figure I found) of mobile phone users were on payg, so unlikely to make long phone calls; probably like you or I, use them when out and about but choose to use the landline otherwise.

None of this indicates that the landline is on its way out any time soon. Two good systems each with their own uses.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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Thats a big decision wavechange .When you give up your land line you lose your “D” side to the cabinet , your “E” side to the exchange and exchange equipment , all that you would have left is a piece of wire from the pole or wall box to your house . Have you looked at the price of a full re-installation? In the meantime somebody has taken both E+D sides for their own use leaving you with the potential of NO underground connection if the local DP is full or there are faulty pairs on it. as well as a reduction in ability to provide an exchange side pair . Also in the event you sell the house , you lose money when you say–no landline only cell-net , that limits the buyers excluding older people who need a landline for medical/ social alarms etc and who have the most money to buy a house ?? -older people , you could lose £1000,s .

Profile photo of wavechange
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Duncan – I just gave students as an example of a significant group that has little need for landline phones, with the exceptions that I mentioned. I wonder what percentage of posts on W?C are made by people below normal retirement age (whatever it is this week).

Edited to add: I have recently taken out a new contract for landline phone and broadband but it would be worth others exploring the future consequences of forgoing a landline phone service.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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Wavechange -Well you are right in respect of the age of posters on Which website although I think those that control Which here are a lot younger . Younger people have other things to do in life which takes up their time and mostly arent interested in spending time here as opposed to Facebook and a multitude of others . But once they marry and settle down reality hits them and upsets them in many directions and they would be more inclined to try the social media to complain and after that if they get a lot of “low grade ” replies they might try posting here . I think the website layout has been “brightened up ” to attract them and thats why the wording in the main Convo,s doesnt always please older and “maybe ” wiser posters like the regulars who can use life experience to help those with less.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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Students are a special group in that they generally are in no position to have a landline.

Around 1 in 5 people are of state pension age – 12 million. there are 23.5 million landlines, many with shared family access. Without commenting on the fairness or otherwise, older pensioners will, I imagine, use a landline more regularly, or even solely, than younger people (below s.p.a.) and will also have broadband access. So many will, under the suggested scheme, pay more than they do now. Including the vulnerable. Perhaps that is right – I do believe in paying what it costs but then having support in place for appropriate people. But it is a consequence.

Profile photo of wavechange
Member

I’m always pleased to see people helping others, Duncan. That could include pointing them towards advice that exists on the Which? website, explaining where to go to for help over a consumer issue, or even looking up whether spares are available for their cooker. 🙂

I support Which? using social media to engage with people. I set up my first website in 1995 but I’m a member of a charity that makes increasing use of Facebook for current news and photos, publicising events and encouraging others to join us. I am pleased to report that I have no ‘Facebook Friends’, only real ones.

Member
Big Ged says:
20 July 2016

I agree, Bill. I detest BT and its rip-off charges (and we all know it’s aming for a £20 landline charge). It must be the most inefficient and greedy company in the world, but it’s a monopoly so it can do what it likes. The Telecomms Regulator is useless, or it would have broken up BT long ago.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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And would you like it the same as the US BG ? ,if so you havent really looked into the prices / coverage /maintenance and most of all availability in areas of NON-profit .Even the US government saw sense and didnt completely brake up its biggest company . Check out US websites relating to complaints about service by MANY companies there .

Profile photo of John Ward
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Why are we always looking to compare our situation with that in America? The USA is completely unlike the UK is almost every way. It is not necessarily the best alternative. There are plenty of better examples on the continent, mainly in the northern latitudes, where services are provided properly by private and state operators. UK systems are often as good as or better than others but we should be learning from the best and upgrading wherever practicable. I think Which? should look east instead of west more often.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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I quite agree John , the problem is most people look west not east and it would take our new government a step to the left politically to implement the positive aspects of the countries I think you are thinking about . What I am saying is more investment in industry of various types and more state money invested to improve our communications ,for the public that is . Many would oppose that , add to that TTIP , which will eventually be introduced (maybe a few years down the line ) and we would then literally be run by the USA whose controls include reduction in grants/assistance to UK businesses if they compete with BB. and ,if the people oppose that BB takes them to court and—wins as has happened in other countries leaving citizens out of pocket .

Profile photo of John Ward
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Thankfully, we won’t be bound to enter the TTIP once we are out of the EU.

Profile photo of malcolm r
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We might be pressured into doing so to have proper trade links with the USA. However it is likely to take much longer to resolve when we have exited, won’t it?

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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malcolm -pressurised-correct . Although behind the scenes the government is for it as is the City , just not told the public yet its down to presentation to the public. I cant see our new “iron ” PM holding a referendum on it. All the political talk in the US is that it will be implemented–eventually or the US wont be “best pleased ” .

Profile photo of John Ward
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Since our trade balance with the USA is currently negative it is hardly an imperative for the government. Back of the queue will do for now. We can put that issue off until we see who will be in the White House in January.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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To achieve what Bill wants technically would first require FTTP as FTTC and copper would not do . Once that is achieved a fundamental change to the routing and digital programming in the exchange would need to take place as is happens with Virgin Media . As Virgin can stop telephonic transmission through its network so could BT once the changes were implemented but until that happens malcolm has a point ,who pays for the routing as it stands at the present time ? When all is fibre then this argument might have a moral justification .

Member
Roger says:
19 July 2016

If I could get a reliable mobile phone signal, I might consider mobile only but where I am we have a poor mobile signal no matter what network. In a bit of a valley so BT land line is necessary.

Member
Vanessa says:
19 July 2016

If you don’t have a mobile signal in your house there really isn’t much option is there?

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Have you tried an external aerial for your cell net phone Vanessa ? , I am not guaranteeing it will work but its worth trying .

Member
Mr Preston says:
23 July 2016

Until the mobile signal at my home is reliable, I have no choice but to make and receive landline calls.

Member
Don Langford says:
30 July 2016

We use our landline more than once a day. It is easy to use and always works. I hate mobile phones but realise that I should have one for safety reasons if nothing else. Strangely, I want a phone to make and receive calls,nothing more. I don’t want a camera as I have several. I don’t want a torch,music,videos etc etc! I have tried a smartphone and will never have one. I can turn it on and off and sometimes make a phone call. Although I am over 80 I am computer literate and use mine every day. It is the awkwardness not the technology that irritates me about mobiles.

Profile photo of wavechange
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I don’t suppose we can interest you in a Swiss army penknife either.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Member

Many complain of the built in charges for a landline so to show I am really even handed and not all BT it has come to my notice that Vodafone have just scrapped the landline charges a few days ago its now being advertised . The drawback ? it depends what area you live in and take it for granted that wee cottage or farm in a rural countryside location wont be on their list of available areas. Now is this another victory for WHICH ?????

Profile photo of malcolm r
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The “victory” simply conceals the way charges are made. I am all for making the full charge payable for broadband clearly shown, but line rental is not being “abolished” it seems.

“Vodafone has not abolished line rental charges, just combined the prices. In fact, as recently as June 5 they were charging £26.99 for unlimited 38Mbps broadband and line rental, so a drop to £25 a month is not particularly generous, especially since their upfront charge has increased by £19 a year.'”

Smoke and mirrors? I hope whatever the headline rate is we will also see the separate items – line charge and broadband charge. We should see the same on our energy bills – how the charge is made up. It may surprise many people.

Read more: thisismoney.co.uk/money/bills/article-3731197/Vodafone-abolishes-18-line-rental-charge-home-broadband-customers.html#ixzz4HFLxskbu

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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I had a look Malcolm at -thisismoney it isnt too explicit Vodafone,s own website say unlimited broadband fibre 38 is £22 to existing customers and BT also increased their rental like other telephone companies but I get where you are coming from . If you take the adverts at face value they make out line rental=£0 I will check out BT,s breakdown. Their advertising is way over the top but it looks like it would work .

Member
A Bridle says:
8 November 2016

I am considering dumping BT. I pay for a landline each quarter, but they won’t correct the fault on my line and so I am unable to make any phone calls. If we’re going to continue with landlines then we need to break BTs monopoly. Their treatment of their customers is appalling.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
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Before you do A how about telling me the fault that BT “wont sort ” . –break BT,s monopoly, dont you mean whats left to BT after a large number of other private companies have taken a lot of the profitable business away from BT and left the unprofitable stuff to BT , if that is the case then BT would be quite happy if Virgin Media-et-al took over your nonprofitable line -but you know what A ? somehow I dont think they will , its called shareholders profit . Do you see a big rush from all those companies to take over remote farms/country cottages miles down a country lane with umpteen telephone poles —I dont . Having said all that I do like to help any telephone user with any company I am not biased so tell me the fault and if I can advise you I will ,even if it is to criticise (justly ) BT.