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It’s bad not to talk on BT’s line rental deal

Landline phone

BT’s been in the news again. Turns out some BT customers aren’t happy with their call charges. Nothing out of the ordinary there, you might think – until you find out that the charges are for calls that aren’t even made.

And we’re not talking billing mistakes – BT charge customers on a certain tariff £1.50 a month because they haven’t made any calls.

BT’s ‘Line Rental Saver’ costs £120 for a year’s line rental if paid up front, as opposed to more than £166 if you pay by monthly or quarterly direct debit – a sizeable saving. The catch is that you must make two BT calls per month, or pay a fixed £1.50 fee.

Putting aside whether this charge is fair, what about transparency? BT told us that the £1.50 charge is ‘prominent on its website and in the customer FAQs’. But when I checked, the clause was clearer on some pages than others.

Are the line rental terms clear?

Navigate to BT’s home phone deals from its home page, click on any of the links that state ‘Line rental from £10’ and the terms are clearly displayed. However, a Google search on ‘BT line rental’ took me to a different page, where this call requirement is only in ‘The legal stuff’ at the bottom of the page.

Clearly, this can’t be that ‘prominent’ as BT had failed to notice that the charge was wrongly listed here as £1.80 (BT’s promised to get this changed urgently after I pointed this out).

You can start your order directly from either page, so I reckon these terms should be made clear on both. There is the possibility that you’re confronted with these terms again during the sign up process, but I was unable to test this as I didn’t want to risk inadvertently switching!

Unfair? Probably not. Bonkers? Yes

You could argue that, as long as it’s clear and up front, the charge isn’t actually ‘unfair’. However, it is a barrier to getting cut-price BT line rental. It also seems a bit bonkers to charge for not providing a service, especially when those two calls could potentially be made on weekends for free under BT’s Unlimited Weekend Calls package (which has no monthly charge). BT’s terms don’t seem to require the two calls to be chargeable ones.

I also wonder if BT is missing a trick by failing to cater to those who just need a fixed phone line for broadband, preferring to use their mobile to make calls. It’s particularly strange when, according to the BT website, ‘Line Rental Saver isn’t available if you’ve ordered a new line without broadband’.

As yet, it’s not possible to get fixed-line broadband without paying for line rental in the UK, unless you have Virgin Media cable. But there are cheaper alternatives around. O2’s PAYG line rental, for example (only available with O2 broadband) offers a straight line rental deal for £7.50 a month.

Even if you’re a regular caller, you could save money by ensuring you’re on the right deal. BT’s Line Rental Saver is one way to cut costs and will suit some down to the ground. But as our guides to home phone services and phone bundles show, there are plenty of other options out there too.

Comments
Guest
Seat Pitch says:
22 June 2011

We only need a landline for broadband as we make 90% of our calls on mobiles. However, in a new house, outside of Virgin Media cable territory, we signed up for BT’s special offer of a £29.99 connection on an 18-month contract at £11.54 a month — which has now increased to £13.90.

Our broadband is with O2 but we couldn’t take their landline offer with an existing line.

For the first eight months or so we made 10 calls or more a month but have recently fallen foul of the small print that states:

‘Minimum call commitment applies – you must make at least 10 chargeable or inclusive calls per month (30 calls per quarter). You’ll need to pay a charge of £5.15 for every month (if you are billed monthly) or £15.45 for every quarter (if you’re billed quarterly) in which you don’t make these calls, as compensation for not making the minimum number of calls required.’
http://www.productsandservices.bt.com/consumerProducts/dynamicmodules/pagecontentfooter/pageContentFooterPopup.jsp?pagecontentfooter_popupid=24641&s_cid=con_FURL_calls_offerterms

So we’re now £10.30 lighter of pocket for two months where we made around three-four calls short of the ‘minimum call commitment’. The alternative is making 10 consecutive calls to any freephone number once a month — pretty ridiculous really.

Yes, we signed the contract. Yes, we read the small print. But it’s hardly encouraging loyalty is it?

Having had issues with BT in the past we were planning on changing line rental provider as soon as the contract was up but this has ensured we’ll be moving on…

Guest

The BT site is a mess, trying to find simple lists of what is available and how to order or switch to various plans is not easy.
The 12 months Line Rental saver isnt even mentioned on some pages.

Finding a number to ring or an email is even more difficult , contact us gives you options for differnet issues with no contact details if your issue isnt in the list.

Guest

When I signed up for the £120 deal over the phone, I was advised very clearly that I must make at least two calls per month. They don’t have to be chargeable calls so, since you get free weekend calls to 01/02/03/0845/0870 numbers, it isn’t difficult to stick to the rules and doesn’t cost anything. You’ll probably find you get much better call quality on your landline too, which people you phone will appreciate, even if you don’t notice or care.

Guest

PS And, if your answer is that you can’t make calls because you don’t have a phone attached to your landline, you should get one, even if only in case of mobile network problems when the day comes that you need to call the emergency services. Phones, even decent quality DECT ones, can be picked up very cheaply.

Guest
Sybilmari says:
28 June 2011

It is high time BT was made to account for all its tricks to take money off customers. I called them for a line repair which had happened on 3 previous occasions – exactly the same fault in their connections outside of my property causing crossed lines, fuzziness and conversations cutting out. The engineer said there was no fault according to his equipment. He then disconnected the wires in the pole in the street, faffed around, reconnected the wires. Hey presto – problem solved (at least for now!). BT insisted there was no fault and charged me nearly £130 for the callout. When fighting this I was told by a person working at BT “you would not believe the number of complaints we are getting about this issue!” My bank reimbursed the money to me and got it back from BT. BT still insist I owe it. Currently the matter is with OTELO. As Openreach is owned by BT I suspect this is a racket, especially as the engineer would not look at me when telling me there was nothing wrong with the line. It’s all about profit and greed.

Guest

just switched to sky after 25+ years with bt.
we have had sky free talk for two years and paid bt for line rental only to be charged quarterly £7.50 for caller id – which fails to work most of the time since we dont make enough calls which is impossible to do as our calls are with sky.
goodbye letter from bt very emotive and suggest maybe we have been ‘conned’ to move – well for bt to know, sky line rental is cheaper and calls not an issue due to low lever of use (mainly use mobile)
goodbye bt, i cant say u will be missed apart from the dividend on the shares…

Guest
Shirley Hiscox says:
28 June 2011

I have had a BT landline for many years but have calls & broadband via Tiscali/TalkTalk. However, I am charged by BT for an Unlimited Weekend plan which includesline rental and a calling plan which is of no use to me as my calls are routed to TalkTalk and do not go via BT. Therefore the package is useless. All BT can say is that it is included. Well, I didn’t want anything included – just a simple landline rental.

Guest
Damn Young says:
17 July 2011

About 4 years ago BT sent me a letter, saying that if I remained a customer after a certain date, I will be deemed to have entered a contract to pay their billing susidiary an extra £4.50 each time I pay my bill. This is because I have always paid by cash in full at a paypoint. This was theft, so I told them to take the phone away, after being a customer for about 28 years.
They had made easy money out of me, as I hardly used the phone, but because of their greed, they now make no money at all out of me.
Although expensive to use, my orange pay as you go mobile is cheap to not use.
Being without a landline is bliss. No more salesmen spoiling my weekends. When the mobile phone annoys me I’ll chuck that as well.