/ Home & Energy, Money, Shopping, Technology

Black Friday: what’s the hype?

Black Friday – is it hot or not? We’ve invited three community members, Beryl, Ian and Duncan, to share their thoughts on this shopping event.

From humble beginnings

Beryl

Pondering the origins of Black Friday, Beryl thinks it’s only a quick fix to lift spirits during the festive season:

‘Black Friday conjures up an abundance of dark negative thoughts, associated with past Black events, such as Black Monday in 1987 when stock markets crashed around the world and Black Wednesday in 1992 when the British Conservative Government was forced to withdraw from European Exchange Rate Mechanism.

‘Curiosity got the better of me when Black Friday appeared on the scene with media portrayals of people scrambling and fighting for sale bargains in our large departmental stores.

‘Black Friday takes place on the fourth Friday in November each year following Thanksgiving Day in the USA. Families gather to celebrate and feast on turkey meals which contributes to in a happy and convivial atmosphere in readiness for the real highlight of the holiday weekend, Black Friday. In lifted moods from the previous day’s merry making they set out for a limited one day extravaganza.

‘With adrenaline buzzing following a week of heavy media advertising, people queue all night for a deal that can’t be missed. A true field day for shopaholics seeking social and sensational therapy to help build their low spirits.’

Crafty commercialisation

IanFor Ian, Black Friday is a time for retailers to reap the rewards:

‘Even the name leaves many feeling uneasy and, yes; it’s another American import.

‘Almost unknown over here until five years ago, when the US online retail giant – Amazon – thought it would try its luck over here, it’s rapidly grown into the busiest shopping day of the year, taking more than £800m last year and expected to top the £1bn mark in 2015.

‘Many argue it’s simply an opportunity for companies to unload goods they can’t sell at their normal prices (and there may well be good reasons why they can’t). While others voice their concerns that this is simply another gimmick for separating the hard-up from their hard-earned. Amazon’s infamous ‘1-click’ makes it possible to buy things with a single touch of a finger, for instance, while many on low incomes, struggling to make ends meet may well feel pressured into buying things they don’t really need.’

Pressurised to buy

DuncanDuncan agrees and feels it’s a pressurised push for us to spend, spend, spend:

‘It is purely a commercial sales exercise designed to spend money on gifts for Christmas.

‘You are encouraged to get into debt, while those too poor to buy those things look in shop windows exactly like the poor Victorians did gazing at things they could never own. While a “Christmas Carol” play comes to mind there is zero chance of a happy end for the crippled child as modern day scrooges, unlike the play, keep taking from the poor but won’t give.

‘Sales? Only for those that can afford it.’

Black Friday: hot or not?

So Black Friday seems to have become a “thing” in the UK.

Whether or not you’re a fan of Black Friday sales there are some bargains to be had out there. Equally, there are plenty of dud deals, for example we found some coffee machines that are on sale all year round.

So what do you think? Are retailers making it a little bit too easy to impulse buying, or are they simply making it more convenient for shoppers? Do the goods on sale represent quality merchandise, or is it yet another opportunity for firms to dispose of hard-to-sell stuff?

Comments

To start the thumbs down, most of us are responsible for our own actions – or put it another way, we would not want other people telling us how to run our lives, financially or otherwise. So if we choose to fritter money away (that we may not have) in any way that is surely our choice. Many may get good bargains, things they need, stuff for Christmas. Some simply enjoy shopping and getting what they hope is a bargain (just like some like spending money on a gig, a football match, a foreign holiday if you can stretch to those)

Me – I’m a bit of a conservative scrooge and generally think hard before making purchases; not what you would call an impulse buyer. As for staring in shop windows at things I can’t afford, well I suffer from envy, however much I may or may not have. A better car, bigger house, nice holiday – but I can get by.

My main proviso would be if Black Friday “bargains” were misleading. Rubbish brands or rebrands, regular products “cut down” to meet a price, reductions that are not genuine. I’d clamp down heavily on those and penalise the retailers – well, I’d ask Trading Standards to if we had an effective organisation.

I agree It is over hyped even by Which

PS – just had an email from Skates: “Don’t Miss Out! – Black Friday Week Ends Monday”. So its really “Black Week” then? Soon be “Black Month”………. 🙁

We already have a name for that. Its called a “DFS sale” !

I agree with this, what a hype and a waste of time. all they are interested in is money at the end of the day. so next thing they will be saying is black whole year. wouldn’t that be wonderful, I don’t think so.

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xmas (no longer a “Christian ” celebration )
————–
Like Easter, it was borrowed from the previous lot, who inherited it from …………….

The Golden Bough………….. A Study in Magic and Religion…………….Sir James George Frazer

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Personally I think the idea that we should only seek to do good because there might be a higher being “keeping score” is self-evident nonsense.

Anyone with feelings for their fellow humans (and other animals) should easily be able to distinguish between good and evil without any recourse to, potentially mythical, deities.

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DL – that might indeed be the case. I have no way of knowing the truth of the matter.

But if I do good stuff now, everyone benefits and if I do really good stuff, the benefits will persist long after I am dead and gone.

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Not sure Frazer’s work is the best example. Overall, The Golden Boughs volumes are less than scrupulous in their planning and layout, and his essential premise (Magic to Science via religion) is questionable, partly since we have so many scientists who seem to be avowed theists.

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Not sure about your main point, there. Scientific theories are simply that: ideas that are open to dispute or confirmation. I suspect your other point is in regard to Quantum Physics and they do behave rationally, just not in the anticipated frame of reference.

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Progress in science requires the breaking of old theories and their replacement with better ones.

Also, if we did ever succeed in the provision of a physical proof for the existence of god, then wouldn’t that remove the need for any religious beliefs?

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Surely Duncan, what Derek was postulating was that if there were physical evidence of a higher being then religion would be redundant since the existential fact would prevail?

I cannot believe there is anybody on this earth who at some time in their life has not done something to help somebody else. However, on this site we are here to help consumers make the best of their lives in the commercial maelstrom that envelops UK society and that is about as much as I can handle at the moment.

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Sorry Duncan – I hope you didn’t think I was trying to constrain you. I was just trying to clarify. You seemed to be agreeing with Derek’s point that if a higher being did materialise there would be no need for religion, but you replied that “if ‘He’ appeared in a physical form religious beliefs would be 100 % justified” – the direct opposite of what Derek was saying, so I was wondering if that was what you meant.

You also seemed to challenge my sentence “I cannot believe there is anybody on this earth who at some time in their life has not done something to help somebody else” because you said the facts prove me wrong. Yet you went on to say that “even the most evil man/woman will do good to their own children”; my point exactly. There is goodness in all of us; unfortunately in too many cases it is overwhelmed by badness.

At the top of this sub-thread [The “January” sales . . . ] Duncan said that Christmas was no longer a Christian celebration. In the part of the country where I live it is very much a Christian celebration, it is an important part of the local schools’ activities, there are many community activities based around Christmas, commercialism is held at bay, and although materialism cannot be denied it is not as rampant as elsewhere. Most people appear to respect the Christian traditions even if they are not practising or were born to other faiths or none at all. The essential messages deriving from the Christian theology seem to resonate and many non-Christians like me do indeed take comfort and satisfaction from that.

1)….. Where’s that, plz?
2)….. ”The essential messages deriving from the Christian theology .. ”
Which are ? ?
** Is blowing up a legal pregnancy termination clinic, and shooting dead bystanders, one of those messages?
** Is classing women as being a lesser type of human than men, one of those messages? A sort of Gender Apartheid ?
** Is being given £millions of Taxpayers dosh to run a school that will only employ teachers of one particular sub-section of a death-obsessed-cult**, one of those messages?
———
[ ** = Xtianity ]

I suggest you read :
1)….. ”Academics suggest Hitch called it right on Mother Teresa.”
And then:
2)…..
The pope beatifies Mother Teresa, a fanatic, a fundamentalist, and a fraud.
By Christopher Hitchens
”She spent her life opposing the only known cure for poverty, which is the empowerment of women and the emancipation of them from a livestock version of compulsory reproduction. And she was a friend to the worst of the rich, taking misappropriated money from the atrocious Duvalier family in Haiti (whose rule she praised in return) and from Charles Keating of the Lincoln Savings and Loan. Where did that money, and all the other donations, go? The primitive hospice in Calcutta was as run down when she died as it always had been—she preferred California clinics when she got sick herself—and her order always refused to publish any audit. ”
C Hitchens.

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duncan, “The “January” sales officially start on December 23rd”. I get my “December” Which? magazines half way through November. We seem gradually to be eating into the future to bring it closer. When the National Lottery results for a Saturday are made available to me (please not them!) on a Friday I’ll be less critical. :mrgreen:

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What we really ought to import from the USA are the normal prices they pay for their goods.

Instead, here in the UK (aka “treasure island”) we often find that we have to pay on the basis that 1 pound here buys the same as 1 dollar over there.

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I do not agree that “corporate greed” is the only credible reason why UK prices can be higher than US ones. I’m sure US corporations can be pretty greedy too – look at Apple and Microsoft for example…

There may be some validity in the arguments about economies of scale. Also I think American consumers can be more “hard nosed” when it comes to negotiating prices.

Should be a comma between “here” and “it’s” in the second line of my little bit. Lauren edited the sentence to remain within her word count, but inadvertently (I’m sure) removed an allusion to Amazon, which then changed the syntax and might leave people thinking I’m mildly illiterate. So, in the interests of full disclosure, here’ the full and original text:

“Black Friday. Even the name leaves many feeling uneasy and, yes; it’s another American import. No one’s sure how the name came about, although many believe it’s related to the bonanza enjoyed by the big stores going into the ‘black’. It’s held on the Friday following Thanksgiving Thursday and was almost unknown over here until five years ago, when the US online retail giant – Amazon – thought it would try its luck and introduce it over here. It’s rapidly grown into the busiest shopping day of the year, taking more than £800m last year and expected to top the £1bn mark in 2015.

Many view the day as an opportunity to buy items far more cheaply than even in the traditional Boxing day sales, and the major retail chains seem set to make this year the biggest yet.

For those pondering the coming season of gift exchanging, this might seem a golden opportunity, but it’s not all straightforward by any means. Many argue it’s simply an opportunity for companies to unload goods they can’t sell at their normal prices (and there may well be good reasons why they can’t) while others voice their concerns that this is simply another gimmick for separating the hard-up from their hard-earned. Amazon’s infamous ‘1-click’ makes it possible to buy things with a single touch of a finger, for instance, while many on low incomes, struggling to make ends meet may well feel pressured into buying things they don’t really need.

The concerns have even been debated in Parliament, and last year Lib Dem MP Greg Mulholland tabled a motion in the House of Commons criticising “large retailers who chose to adopt the American retail custom of Black Friday” for enabling public disorder and wasting police time. The motion, which was signed by Jeremy Corbyn, called on UK retailers not to engage in Black Friday again.

So what do you think? Are retailers making it a little bit too easy to succumb to impulse buying or are they simply making it more convenient for shoppers? Do the goods on sale represent quality merchandise, or is it yet another opportunity for firms to dispose of hard-to-sell stuff? In short, what is Black Friday: yet another profit-motive US import or a golden opportunity to save prior to Christmas? “

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I shall do that forthwith.

1)……. As a new entrant to this Forum, I do find it difficult to sort out who is an official Mod, and who just appears to be. I have posted and asked that Official Mods signify their status in some way. So far this seems not to have been done.
Your explanation of why this has not been undertaken would be most welcome.
————-
2)………… What other ” ‘Editing’ without consultation”, rights do Mods have please – I don’t mean Deletions.

Thanks

I posted the first time you asked: Administrators (or Moderators) have a red line down the RH side of each of their posts and a red circle around their names.

Since I don’t spend all of my time on this site
AND
The post didn’t reach my ”hearing”
AND
How am I supposed to know that’s what those indicators mean?
AND
A simple word like AdMod [Administrator – Moderator] would be so much easier for those not already ‘In the In Crowd”.
AND
I trust that you’ll get a payment for doing the AdMods jobs for them.
BUT
‘fraid all I can send is a thank you.
SO
Thank you.

Hi Josef – Almost without exception, when the duty moderator amends a comment they put a note at the foot, in italics, to say something like “This comment has been tweaked to align with our community guidelines” [and the same applies to the removal of posts], and they include a link to those guidelines so the writer can see the reason for the moderation. I don’t think any changes or deletions take place without it being stated.

As was explained elsewhere recently, the Which? staff cannot cover the weekends comprehensively so questions raised then might go unanswered for a day or two, but other participants might volunteer an answer.

If you go right to the top of this Conversation you will see that it was written by Lauren Deitz [Conversation Editor] and she has done most of the moderating, but her posts have mainly been part of the Conversation and this happens quite a lot – where the author of the Intro picks up points or answers queries or gives more information, and the red bar and circle are there to highlight their contribution and distinguish it from the other commenters like us.

I would recommend, if you do leave a question, that you pop back from time to time to see if someone has offered a response. I have found that within minutes of saying something another member of the community has come back with an explanation or a further point and it keeps the conversation lively.

Thank you for that, tho’ because of the silo-ed structure , and the pageless format of this forum, returning to a particular post after doing something else in one’s life, is errrr – difficult.
Your repeat of the
”red bar and circle are there to highlight their contribution and distinguish it from the other commenters like us.”
is, now I know what it means, obvious.
But
” … as we know, there are known knowns;
there are things we know we know.
We also know there are known unknowns;
that is to say we know there are some …. ”

And how should I ken, if I didn’t ken in the first place?
.

I’ve got a tip on that as well: If you click on “Our community” in the ribbon across the top of the page, then either scroll down the page until you find your name and avatar [if the post you are looking for is recent], or enter you name in the “Search for someone” box, you will see all of your posts in order of the latest first.

YET another GREAT ‘tip’ – t u.
WHY are all these not rolled into one
*** Intro Package for Newbies?***
Or would that not be Public School enough for the Interns who seem to run most of these Forums nowadays, and wish to follow in the path of such past members of this Parish as Roger Taylor ?
.

Entering the world of Which? Conversation is a journey of exploration and discovery. But a ‘new users’ guide’ is an excellent suggestion . . . why don’t you post it in the Conversation called “Welcome to the new Which? Conversation” [3 September 2015]?

I wrote the User Guide for the very first W? forum (think it’s still there, actually) and in those days you really, really needed a guide. Not quite as necessary, now, since most forums have adopted similar modes of operation, and if you’re used to one you can normally extrapolate to another.

This one does lack two very useful items, though: a decent ‘Quote’ function and chronological post listing. I still find the threaded post system can be very confusing – especially to newcomers. However, the Message Centre system here (click Recent Activity / comments ) is pretty good, to be fair.

WILCO

Having last night watched the TV prog about the last flight of the Vulcan, what else can I reply, WingCo ?
;-))

I have not yet been led into temptation and I intend to keep it that way. The things I want are never sold cheap anyway.

Budgerigars? 🙂

My aunt had one – she hung its cage next to the window so it could see out. I don’t want one even if they are going cheap.

”Auntie Mary had a canary
Up the leg of her drawers
She pulled a string to hear it sing
And down came Santa Claus ”

[Trad.]

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Sharp as Occam’s Razor as ever, DL.

It is the cleaned up version, as you rightly point out. We Newbies do have to step lightly to avoid the :
Rule of Three Thumbs Down
lest we be relegated to the
Do NOT Buy
box.
Whereupon there would be a
Great Whaling, and National Teeth (sic)
from me at least.
[That bible gets in everywhere]
.

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I assume that John is referring to things that money cannot buy, so no point in looking for discounts.

You never own what you buy anyway – ‘cos when you’re gone, you’re gone. We just temporarily borrow things. Keeping away from temptation may be the road to future comfort. 🙂

You believe in the Curator concept of life, then? ISTR that was an Eric Frank Russell concept originally.

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EFR was a Sci-Fi author, DL. I think he originated the Curator concept which was simply that we’re all a part of the life cycle on this planet and we therefore have not only a duty to take care of it, but none of it is ever our own; we’re simply curating it for the future populations.

Another Sci Fi author – Kim Stanley Robinson – expanded on the idea in the Mars trilogy. He had some interesting ideas of which I’m pretty sure you would approve. One was that ownership of land or property was strictly forbidden; everything was rented. The twist was in how governance was accomplished. There were no polls and no voting. Instead, unless they could advance a very good argument against, every adult over the age of 16 had to serve a term of office on a regional council – very like jury duty today. Those seen as the best on the councils were then moved on to the national bodies.

Neither idea, however, presupposed an overall deity or higher being. Both instead chose to focus on individual and collective responsibility towards the planets in question.

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Eric Frank Russell was a contemporary of Asimov and Clarke, DL. I recommend his books.

Ian, not much of a concept in my view. Simply that whatever I might own now I cannot take with me when I go. Unless someone knows differently of course………

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There’s no virtue in my philosophy – if I do want something I tend to get it on impulse without waiting for this week’s warehouse clearance sale, or price-match, or big discount bonanza, or Blue Cross sale, or Black Friday, or Boxing Day, or other event, to come round. The only moderation is my inherent frugality and conspicuous parsimony.

My children seem very adept at getting bargains without waiting for events. If they find something the need or intend to buy – a light fitting, furniture, a projector, oak fire doors as recent examples – they spend time on the internet. Purchases through ebay (new Next and John Lewis stuff for example), Amazon warehouse (returned goods or damaged packaging, Amazon.de – same item, much cheaper than uk – as well as individual traders have yielded exactly what they have wanted at really good prices. Even sourcing delivery for heavy items, like the doors, through a kind of on-line bidding site has proved very reliable.

No impulse buying, time to research and think what you need. Why be pressurised by Black Friday?

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I personally do not purchase items on Black Friday but love watching the bedlam taking place in the High Street.

Even if we buy at bargain prices, the seller is either making a reasonable profit or will not be in business for long.

It is quite common to see a wide variety of prices for the same camera or other product. I presume that the higher prices are there to make the lower ones look like a bargain. Or would no-one stoop this low, even on Black Friday?

Latest BBC news states more people buying Black Friday goods online than last year and fewer people in the stores.

It makes more sense to me to arrange a pre Xmas sales event whatever colour it may be, than a pro Xmas sale.

I hope we have seen an end to pro Xmas queues with people returning unwanted Xmas gifts looking for a refund 🙁

I hope this unsmiley appears.

Having visited Dublin one Easter weekend I thought Black Friday referred to Good Friday, because on that day all the pubs are shut! But now that I realise it’s today and it comes from the US, I’m thinking, goodness knows America is full of marvellous things and dreadful things (there doesn’t seem to be half measures, one of the wonders of that amazing country). Why must we keep on importing the bad as well as the good?

Amongst Amazon’s contribution to culture is the “extortion” of grants from places willing to host its mega warehouses. This includes the Welsh government . And now Which? in an ethical stance uses their services to send you notifications of additional messages to this thread! : )

You have to wonder whether in pursuit of the cheapest deal even charities seem to have an ethical dilemma.

As we know Amazon is blase regarding the safety of products provided through its marketplace and it is probably worse at this time of year. I do believe there are considerable dangers to the economy of local stores in this sales frenzy. The media [and Which?] are generating huge amounts of sales for the big stores who can hold and store vast amounts of stock.

The knock-on effect is to weaken the sales for the smaller stores for the rest of the year until such time as they
collapse. This of course leads to empty High St. sites and unemployed staff – local to you.

I would be hugely happy if this consumer forum would actually man-up and address the economic and social issues inherent in destroying small businesses. And this is the time of year for Which? to do it. please!

Leave it to people to decide what to do but provide the darker side of Black Friday

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I can remember the days of ”Window Shopping” in the West End of London.
People got dressed up to do it – even tho’ the shops were SHUT.
For many across the country it was an essential part of Courting, and partner suitability determination activities.

Now, far too many people can’t even hope for 1/2 decent living accommodation, never mind furnishing it.

BRILLIANT !

We decided to use the occasion to replace our ancient cooker. Which? as usual was of little use on product reviews.
After visiting a very helpful local store where there was not much to see we went to the only store where you can actually see anything.

Wow!! aren’t cookers a load of tat now. From cheap plastic knobs, badly fitting shelves, badly fitting grill handles, oven linings that easily scrape off when you move the shelves, shelves being held up by a flimsy rack that was not supported at the back (3 brands from the same company were like that), grill pans that couldn’t be removed without scraping agains the glass door…..the list goes on.

We had seen full size Rangemasters at the local store and decided to go with one of their smaller models. There were some very good offers on the internet but we do like to support small local shops when we can. We called them this morning for a price and they came back with an excellent offer. So it is always worth giving them a chance first.

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Spot on as often, DL.
The ENGLISH have an attitude to manual toil which harks back to their Norman-French invader heritage :
* if it’s classed as manual, it’s for the serf class;
* if it’s classed as sitting around, pretending you’re ”managing”, it’s for the ruling class

This went as far as, for example, a rule at Henley Royal Regatta banning any prospective competitor:
”Who is or has been by trade or employment for wages a mechanic, artisan or labourer.”.
That type of silliness is celebrated by the ”chinless wonder/ pinta-price” element and is reflected in the UK’s incapacity to even build our own next generation of nuclear power stations whilst spending £billions on drone activities such as opera, ballet, buying and selling objets d’art and propping up swathes of major, minor and minute royals, and other harry-stock-racy.

The Normans remained the ruling class whilst the majority of us Anglo-Saxons were those serfs. The French still refer to the white anglophone world as anglo-saxon, too.
I think the premise of your first point falls down pretty swiftly.

Very few of us would ever even dream of going to Henley, though this example does illustrate the worst of British/English snobbery.

As a republican (not the American kind, just anti-monarchy), I do agree with the sentiment of your final paragraph!

@ Mousseux
I think the premise of your first point falls down pretty swiftly.
————–
”Spot on as often, DL.”

You mean that DL is ALWAYS ”spot on” .

OK, I’m not going to argue over the odd 1 or 2 %

”Spot on as always, DL!

Happy now, Mousseux ?
Are YOU happy, DL ?

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I did look up Hypo versus Hyper, tried to post it………………… but it got lost !

Thnx, DP (?)

Since a large percentage of the UK population is no longer English I think some of these attitudes are on the way out now. I had a good laugh at your comment though; I usually travel serf class so I have little knowledge of the people you describe, Josef.

1)… ”… large % .. ”
Like ??
2)….. Yep, some are:
Scots
Irish
Welsh
British

;-))

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+ 1, DL

Actually, I think we are technically capable of building new nuclear power stations. We certainly do manage to design and build the nuclear reactors that are used to power Royal Navy submarines.

That’s right. The engineering and construction of the new nuclear stations will be undertaken by UK contractors and most of the components will be made in the UK. The design will probably follow the latest examples built in China because they are the most modern but they are not exclusively Chinese designs; they incorporate technology from previous generations of nuclear plant and from other leading nations in nuclear power development. The major Chinese contribution is the financial investment.

Then given the astonishingly low interest rates now available to UK on the International money markets, why don’t WE, via that astute Mr O, borrow the Dosh, and keep it all ”In House”, and free from ANY ‘foreign’ possible security risks?
It would mean that any profits accruing would come straight into Mr O’s UK bank A/c, held in trust for us.

”Ekernomiks 4 Dimwits”, is needed 4 me 4 Krimble.
.

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China will probably supply the reactor and its associated assemblies but probably 75% of each nuclear plant will be conventional construction, equipment and fittings that can be sourced in the UK and from the Continent. If reinforced concrete and steel fabrications and all the hundreds of thousands of minor components that make up a massive complex of buildings were going to be brought in from China I should be amazed but obviously I don’t have the trade union’s inside knowledge and perhaps what Mr Smith says is right.

I’ve got a Chum=Chum [Identical twins] who own and run a huge ferrous and nonferrous, metal reclamation business.
Thousands of tonnes from ‘redundant’ manufacturing plants pass thru’ their pulverizers on their way to ….
China
Where they are made into all manner of ‘stuff’ which is exported to …….
UK.
WHAT ?

Hei, I’ve got tickets for Henley….. as long as you promise not to wear your ….
Safety Helmet
Hi-Viz Vest
Safety Specs
Steel toes boots
….

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That’s a good question and I think the answer is (a) because we are already getting over-extended with new roads, railways, houses, fighter aircraft, submarines, aircraft carriers, destroyers and prisons which will largely be paid for from borrowings, and (b) because the Chinese have the expertise since we haven’t actuually designed and built a nuclear power station for many years.

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I thought Parliament had merely agreed to achieve the NATO obligation [2% of GDP if my memory serves me right – announced during the Summer Budget]. Some NATO countries are having difficulty in reaching that level. I believe the commitments being made now by the UK, projecting over many years into the future, are just our fulfilment of that obligation.

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My comment starting “That’s a good question . . .” is a reply to Josef’s comment that starts “Then given the astonishingly low interest rates . . .”

[Once we get to the second indent it seems impossible to keep these threads in order.]

My comment starting “That’s a good question . . .” is a reply to Josef’s comment that starts “Then given the astonishingly low interest rates . . .”

As a matter of interest Alfa, do you know where your new Rangemaster cooker was made? I believe they still do manufacture in the UK but it might only be assembly.

Aside from the philosophical and political debate above (which I have enjoyed reading), I have been sitting here in France checking out both Amazon France and Amazon UK, and finding nothing in their Black Friday (week) offers to tempt me. In fact, most of it was essentially tat.

Yet I hear on the BBC news today that Amazon is reporting its highest ever daily sales in the UK for yesterday.

Well, I suspect, in that case, that there will be be many a gift provoking some disappointment for its receiver!

I hope you all had more luck finding a bargain than I did!

It is a total con to make more for the sellers not the customers.I have not seen anything that is worth the prices asked,it is a con end of.

Back to my old story about a marketing course I was made attend.
What it taught me was that if its needs promoted I probably dont need it.
If we actually need something not want it there will be 1000s on the shelves mostly at the right price if we are wise enough to check the supposed offers.
It’s the ordinary goods that mostly get us in the door
I like late evenings when the end of day stuff gets marked down. Call me whatever but that is usually a proper bargain.
Xmas eve is good on the auctions if you need something and it ends that eve.
I got 2 nice titanium solar branded watches for 4.99 a couple years back.

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Hi Duncan, It wasnt only in the US. We had 3 children and the nonsense went on here also.
It just goes from the one thing to the next. Trainers, Football boots, Play Station which should have read Pay Station.
We have a room space full of this doll, that train etc, Its so b**** full there no room left and I dont want to see it because I’ll cry if I have to count the costs.
Marketing is just robbery by a different name

DK, one of the difficulties of bringing up children is to teach them the value of products and what they need, and what they don’t. Peer pressure – keeping up with the Jonses – is very hard to resist at that age. In the end it is down to parental discipline, but of course many parents cannot resist the same pressures to maintain their “status”.

As you say, when you look at the cost of accumulated junk you see just how powerful the pressures can be. Resisting marketing is like defeating alcohol, drugs, or sweeties – easy said, hard to do.

I wonder if goths regard Black Friday as a good or bad idea.

Oh Wave I think they can get into the Black Friday thing also but I enjoyed the idea your post painted in my minds eye

This comment was removed at the request of the user

It would largely depend upon the colour of their bank balances I would think Wavechange 😉

I assumed they had at least one every week.

John says: [Once we get to the second indent it seems impossible to keep these threads in order.]

It certainly does, and it makes the entire threaded concept redundant.

I had planned to go into town to do some shopping on Friday but decided to give it a miss in case it was busy.

I eventually succumbed to the Black Friday hype and bought ten ink cartridges online, saving £1.50.

Black ink wavechange?

Two sets of colour plus black cartridges plus two ‘free’ black ones. I think that is a standard pack, which could account for the three spare black cartridges I have in stock.

I was looking for a xmas present for my grandchild and I found it on Amazon with a certain company. Not bad price but then I found the same company advertising the same product with Black Friday 25% off. When I went on the companies webb site the price had jumped higher and there was also postage. Ended up hardly any difference on price. So much for their Black Friday offers.

We are now on “Cyber Monday”. I presume each day of the week will eventually have a forename where when can find even more bargains. So one day, every day will see reduced prices – a bit like Homebase and, as someone remarked earlier, DFS.

It’s a pity there are not such deals on, for example, energy bills, rent and council tax. I am a bit concerned, though, that NatWest bank offers 3% discount on certain “staple” bills like gas, electricity,, council tax, water, broadband, mobile phone. I hope the supply companies do not contribute to this discount otherwise we will all end up giving their customers a subsidy.

Didn’t consider this one. Email from Halfords today “Don’t tell me it’s over? Cyber Week Deals Now On. Must End Monday!”. We’ll soon have weeks, not days, for everything then. Bank holiday week perhaps. Valentine’s week.

It’s called …. EeeBuyGumBay…