/ Motoring

Desperate to flog your car? Don’t sell it online

Computer keyboard with picture of car as a key

Why is it that the more cash-strapped people are, the more likely they are to get a bad deal? Our latest investigation into online car buying sites proves that desperation to sell often means a bad price for your motor.

Imagine that you’ve just lost your job and can’t think of any way to buy food or pay your mortgage than to sell your car.

Doesn’t the sound of a buyer who won’t wince over the odd paintwork scratch, or suck air through his teeth looking at the state of the interior, and try to knock down your price sound like a dream come true?

Well, the likes of Webuyanycar.com and Trademymotor.co.uk say they’ll give you a fair price for your car and complete the deal quickly, safely and easily. But I say don’t be fooled into thinking they’ll give you a decent price for your motor.

How low will you go?

In our research all the prices offered by Webuyanycar were well below the trade value of our cars – that’s the price you could expect to get selling it at auction. This is generally well below the amount you could expect from a high street dealer or in a private sale.

Worse still, Trademymotor.co.uk not only offered low prices, but some were reduced – in one case by more than £1,000 because the inspector said it needed a re-spray – when the seller took the car to the depot. Afterwards, the seller was distraught and seriously concerned that her car had a major paintwork problem – it didn’t.

Yet, because our mystery shoppers didn’t really want to sell their cars, they refused these derisory offers. And surprise, surprise, the prices offered by Trademymotor.co.uk started to creep back up. It seems to me that it’s blatantly clear that the Trademymotor.co.uk buyers were simply trying their luck – and that could mean that the more desperate you are to sell, the less you’re likely to walk away with a decent return.

Trading Standards needs to step in

We think this is such bad practice that we’ve reported our findings on Trademymotor.co.uk to Trading Standards, and are hoping they take a closer look at the way the company operates.

Personally I think that any company that aims to make a living by paying well below the market value for goods – and in doing so leaves people even more short of money when times are already tight – should be closely monitored and penalised if they flout consumer protection regulations.

Have you obtained a valuation from an online car buying firm, or sold your car to one? If so, how did you fare?

Comments
Guest
Ashley Moon says:
19 January 2012

Interesting report but not the first of this type reporting the low prices paid by on line car companies. I do believe this type of article should come with background information that does put into perspective the valuations/offers that people receive.
Cash for car companies perform a valuable service especially for those people that need to sell their car quickly for various reasons, those people that don’t want the hassle of selling a car privately and whilst sending your car to auction is a viable option, would the general public send their car somewhere and not have the use of it whilst it is sold..if it sells.
Reports like this often quote the “below trade” valuations people receive for their cars, but doesn’t take into consideration the costs these companies incur. staffing, advertising, collection, selling fees to name just a few.
Cash for car companies provide a valuable source of cars to traders who do not wish to deal directly with the public for fear of buying a “wrong un” – This does happen and more often than you would like to believe. Cash for car companies have to take this on the chin sometimes losing hundreds if not thousands of pounds on cars they buy that are not as described or have serious mechanical faults that have been covered up. They can’t go back to the seller once they have paid for it.
My tip for avoiding those cash for car companies that do reduce their offers on final inspection is to be as honest as possible in your appraisal and use a company that comes to you to collect and pays before they leave with their vehicle. If you are on home ground your negotiating position is much stronger as the company collecting will already have incurred costs coming to you. Alloys wheel scuffs, minor trolley dents and small scratches do not effect the value by as much as some companies would have you believe. If you are upfront about any damage then you should be safe knowing that the offer you received online or over the phone is the amount you will receive in your bank when the company come to collect your car. At the end of the day do not accept an offer you are not happy with.

Guest
John Swannell says:
20 January 2012

I attempted to sell a bmw on webuyanycar.com in September. They offered me £12,000. I eventually got £17,500 as a trade in from a main mercedes dealer. They would have still made a profit, so basically it felt like an attempted rip off. Obviously it was my choice and I declined, but how stupid do they think people are?

Guest

I feel the same how stupid can people be to sell to these companies who offer about 2/3 of the trade in value if that I think the only people who take there offer up are the people who have cars that do have something really wrong with them and can’t be sold legit.
If they offered the proper prices they would receive a much better quality enquiry from punters and stopped trying to rip people off, We Buy Any Car cut down a bit on the advertising and offer more to the customers.
Did a test Merc SL 400 new January 2015 paid £75,000 there price with 10,000 miles as new £36,500

Guest
nicknick says:
20 January 2012

Easy enough to do a check – just done mine an 07 plate Saab. Webuyanycar = £3,100. Parkers = £4700 part exchange (the worst price) and between £6,000 and £6,300 at a dealer.

You still have to book an appointment and go to their franchised dealer, and it would be just as easy to go to the main dealer for your car (probably a similar distance)

They are a real rip-off and I see them similarly to those ‘send us your gold for cash’ companies (and also the payday loan companies). As things get worse there are always those with no morals who are prepared to try and rip-off the vulnerable/desperate.

They are not really any different in my mind to a the type of person who calls on an old lady and ‘steals’ her life savings by pretending to mend a fictitious problem with her roof.

There is something wrong with our society when we let these people exist legally, when they are basically fraudsters and therefore crooks as far as I am concerned

Guest
Oafski says:
20 January 2012

Following a horrendous renewal quote for the insurance I contacted We buy any car for a quote on a T reg BMW 523i Estate. They came back with £620 less the £50 fee so in reality £570. A work colleague bought it from me for £1400 and considered they had a bargain. These people really are scumbags preying on the desparate or ignorant.

Guest
Geoff Edwards says:
20 January 2012

SELLING ON LINE PRIVATELY
Although slightly off the point could you make people aware of the paypal scam where the buyer is overseas but makes an offer to pay in full in advance saying his agent will pick it up. The money duely arrives in your account and you release the car and documents in good faith. (why wouldnt you since you have been paid?)
Two days later the buyer complains to paypal that the item is not as described.
Paypal then makes a no quibble refund to the buyer and debits your account with the full amount!
The thief now has his money back and your car complete with documents!
You have no car AND a debit for the full asking price.
They didnt catch me but very nearly did.
Also there is a scam offering to pay in full with a bankers draft.
Paying in full for a car you have not seen is too good to be true
and that is always exactly what it is,TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE!
Hope this can help someone avoid being ripped off
Regards
Geoff
ps You may already be aware of this but I certainly wasn’t!
My 30 year old Son would have been taken in!

Guest
David Khan says:
20 January 2012

It seems to me that people don’t understand what these companies do… They buy cars at a trade price to make a trade profit…Even the reporters who research them don’t understand the concept…They have massive overheads and running cost and they are not a free service… looking at the comments above its like you people want them to work for free ! I run a car dealership and its tough times, we look at these sites for valuations ourself from time to time as the market is so volatile and a lot of the guides like CAP and Glasses are so far away from reality its a joke these site are usually spot on as there pricing is based on live trading date from what they have previously sold much like CAP do but there figures are a month behind always. People need to get in their head that if you are going to buy and new car then obviously the dealer is going to offer more for your part exchange as he will be taking profit out of the one he is selling you…for example if I have 2000.00 profit in a car and you want £1500.00 for your part exchange which is actually worth £1000.00 I’m just going to juggle the figures and discount my car by £500,00 to make the figures stack up. At the end of the day the car is still worth £1000.00 I’ve just played with the figures to fit the deal.If that customer came to me and asked me to buy it without the sale of a new car I would offer behind book for it probably £800.00 ish as Im taking as risk buying of a member of public. I think companies such as We buy any car and Trademymotor take great risks in operating such outfits.

Guest
andy says:
26 August 2015

i think you miss the point theses people are selling there cars and everyone fells the pinch as a car dealer if it’s tough times you may think about an alternate form of making money . no one is part exchanging there motors they are buying sites. you also miss the fact that everyone does want something for free even these car buyers. i myself tried 2 of theses companies the book price for my car on auto trader was £2800 and yes i was expecting to make a loss as both companies offered me around £1800 as i did not need the car and had bought another car it seemed a good idea to sell it to them for a quick sale. having spent around an hour at there site they went through the car with a fine toothed comb also test drove the chap at the centre handed me his phone to someone in manchester who explained the car was not at its best because the glowplugs needed replacing and if the light was on when he had it mot’d it would fail and offered me £500 as is or £1000 if i did the glowplugs as you can see thats a massive price difference for a 10 minute job. these companies are trying to buy dirt cheap and sell high VERY HIGH and as for massive overheads the site was incorporated within a garage and van centre. so it seems to me its a quick way to make buck.

Guest
Ken Protheroe says:
20 January 2012

About 4 years ago the car I wanted to sell was a Caterham CSR 260, mileage just over

(from memory) 11,000. “We buy any car.com” offered me £14,000.0. I sold it to

the Dursley garage that deals with Caterham for £30,000.0. I believe it was sold

on by them for $34,000.0. So I regard “We buy any car.com” as daylight robbers.

Guest
Ken Protheroe says:
20 January 2012

That should read £34,000.0.

Guest

I sold my daughter’s car for her a couple of years ago when poor health forced her to give up buying.

I can’t remember the exact figures, but webuyany offered around £1,400 – similar to the trade price in the guides.

I advertised the car for £1,750 and accepted £1,650 in a private sale. I think both buyer and seller felt they’d got a fair deal.

Overall, Webuyany was very useful. Normally you set your price according to the advertised prices of similar cars. But my daughter’s car was a small automatic – they’re few and far between. Webuyany had effectively set a backstop price that I wouldn’t go below, which in turn helped set an advertising and sale price. Yes, there are price guides, but their prices are often some way off the mark.

Guest
Alan says:
20 January 2012

I had a good experience with webuyanycar. I wanted to sell our second car, so wasn’t looking for trade-in and I wanted a quick hassle-free deal. I did the online form-fill thoroughly, though I couldn’t find where to put my ABS problem. I was happy with the quote. At their office in Basingstoke I told them about the ABS and they knocked off £300 (a nice surprise as my garage had quoted over £400 to fix it), and as the inside was cleaner than expected they added £50. The young guy I dealt with was very polite and personable, making the whole experience very pleasant, and 4 days later the cash was in my account. However, my car was only worth around £1000 – maybe I would have shopped around for a better deal if it was worth much more. But for a low-value car that you don’t want to waste a lot of time on I’d certainly recommend them.

Guest
nicknick says:
20 January 2012

Sorry David, but I quoted the ‘exchange price’ as it was the lowest price quoted, the dealer prices were around the 6k mark nearly double the weconyoueverytime price. As I bought mine from a main dealer @£8.5k a year ago (including a £500 trade in for the poor car I did have), and this was a typical dealer price at the time I would expect £3k to be a joke.

I did do a search on Autotrader and you are right regarding the Parkers price being off, but the typical selling price is still around £6k, which tends to suggest £4.5k might be a typical price an independent dealer would pay (unless secondhand car dealers are as bad as bankers and are looking for a 100% profit) – having said that the main dealer I bought mine from is still selling cars similar to mine at around the price I paid.

I’m surprised you are defending them as it would seem they are eating your lunch (unless you are one of their franchises)

Guest
nicknick says:
20 January 2012

Did another quick check. Pick a random car from a dealer, put the details into weconyoueverytime and see what the answer is. Main dealer price £9,500 (£500 discount as they have a sale on), weconyoueverytime price £3,500. Either the main dealers are much worse than bankers or weconyoueverytime are ripping people off (or a bit of both).

Also picked a random car (completely different make) from Autotrader (independent dealer) price there is £7,999 weconyoueverytime price is 5k. £3k still seems like a big difference to me.

Guest
David Khan says:
20 January 2012

Its not that I am defending anyone…. Its just you obviously don’t operate a business where every month your asset (stock) depreciates sat on your forecourt. They are not eating my lunch as I buy from auction and have in the past bought stock auctioned from the above.. and if these companies didn’t exist the cars would still be there to be purchased but many customers would have been forced to part ex maybe for lower value cars to make ends meet.they are giving people an option and I say OPTION in captial letters because they are not forcing anyone to sell to them….. The way I operate is I want minimumn of 2 k across every vehicle I buy. why you may ask… Firstly every car will be serviced and 12 month MOT’d average £250.00 cost, Prep cost any dents paint work my average prep per car is £240.00, Advertising costs an average dealer will pay Autotrader £600.00 per month to advertise 8 cars. then warranty 3 months std cost around £85.00… So already I have 650.00 of my profit of 2k leaving me £1350.00 profit No i must pay my VAT on the margin Scheme now if my prep cost are not VATable I have nothing to claim so I pay VAT on the 2k this is £333.33 which leaves me with 1016.67 now must pay staff rent rates bills etc….. All the stuff you consumers forget about when you think your being ripped off… Just Saying

Guest
nicknick says:
20 January 2012

Perfectly valid. But you are talking about £2k as your margin, and they are using £3k or more in the examples above, and I expect they have big deals on service/warranty etc which mean their cost per car is a lot less than yours. So I would still expect to get a better deal coming to you than them, so I still think they are a rip-off.

However, if you are saying they are giving me as good a deal as coming to you or another independent dealer, is the future of the independent dealer over?

Guest

I tried to get a quote from that company with the REALLY annoying adverts on the TV. According to Glass Guide I should have been offered the trade in of £1050 – the top book retail price being £2010. Even with a mint condition car I was offered……….£50, and that is not a typing error, Oh yes and there were £49 of fees hidden in the small print. Rip off does not cover it – I could have got £150 from the scrapyard without any issue of haggling!

Guest
David Khan says:
20 January 2012

Yes I understand but they don’t retail there own cars they all go to auction even the ones that end up in Carcraft are bought back from auction.. So they are aiming to make a profit in the trade a rumour has it after all advertising cost and overheads they net on average £50,00 per car how true this is I don’t know. Independent dealers are here to retail stock not buy from public so we will always have our place in the market as main dealers as a rule don’t sell used cars any older that 5 years or 60,000 miles so someone has to sell the older and higher mileage cars 🙂

Guest
Robin hood says:
21 January 2012

Tried to sell a Astra 1.6 3 years ago online on Autotrader ,they had a deal advertise for 1 week and get a week free so it went in for 6 weeks approx. Pitched the price mid to low range as It was sat on my drive & the tax & insurance was imminent but I wasn’t desperate for the cash.
The people who contacted me :
Made appointments to view & didn’t turn up
Tried to haggle the price down without even viewing
One asked me to pay his petrol if he came to view
6 weeks of this nonsense & I was really happy to sell to we buy any car, got a valuation below what I expected with the usual nonsense on the day with the inspection & recovering the road tax . If you’re buying a new car always trade it in, the dealer will give you a great price but really he’s discounting from his profit on the gleaming new stallion you’ve just bought. I had traded a 12year old Peugeot 306 on the new car I had bought and got the £2.5k scrapage trade in on it which sadly is no longer available from the new government

Guest

Robin,
Selling any car even at a fair market price is never easy. All would be buyers are looking to secure a low cost bargain and your experience with your autotrader add is not uncommon.
However by using “webuyanycar” you have avoided the hassel but paid the price for this with the low sales price.
However It’s your car and your money so your choice.
What I find a little puzzeling is that many sellers don’t realise “webuyanycar” are going to offer a very low price, often well below “trade in” and far lower than could be achieved by going the extra yard and selling privately.

As for your advice “buying a new car always trade it in” I don’t agree. What seems like a good trade in value is really (as you said) a discount on the new car. But that discount was always there if you asked for it to secure the sale.
Sell your old car privately and ask for the dealer discount on the new car. That way you’ll do better on both the old car and the new.

Guest

Come on, you only need half a brain to realise an outfit like “webuyanycar” is going to offer you peanuts. Their business plan relies on mugs who will sell dirt cheap so “webuyanycar” can finance all the advertising and still make a good profit.
Unless you want to set yourself up as a dealer with a forecourt etc. the best price for your car will come from a private sale, ebay is not too bad but you need to know a bit about selling on ebay to get a reasonable price. Most ebay buyers are understandably looking for a good deal so sellers need to know what auction price to start from, should consider a reasonable reserve level and must be honest if you want a smooth fair transaction.
Don’t go anywhere near “webuyanycar” unless you want to practically give the thing away.

Guest
Denis Underwood says:
21 January 2012

I recently sold my jeep to webuyanycar.com having refused the part exchange offered by a main dealer
when purchasing of a nearly new Kia. Two other dealers offered me even less. We buy any car purchased the car leaving me with a £880 gain on the price offered by the main dealer. They did not rubbish the condition of the car which is what I anticipated and commented positively about the clean condition of the car. I paid £25 for a next day bank transfer which arrived as promised. A friend of mine in Scotland had a similar positive experience.

Guest
Roger says:
22 January 2012

When my dad-in-law died a year ago, I disposed of his beloved old car, an Omega automatic, by temporarily switching my insurance and using the car whilst displaying a “for sale” sign. I got £400 for it quite quickly. The book value was about £600 and webuyanycar.com had offered £75 so I was pleased with the outcome.

My point is that old-fashioned methods of buying and selling need not and should not be allowed to be superceded by the cyber-world, which can be a very murky place. On the other hand, if a vendor and/or his car have something to hide, webuyanycar might then be a natural choice.

Guest
Jenny, Glasgow says:
23 January 2012

I sold my car 30 months agao to wewillbuyyourcar – a company not included in the latest research due to its requirement that you actually sell the car to them if they turn up and value your car at the same as the online quote. Having already agreed to the purchase of a replacement car, I found that wewillbuyyourcar offered a much higher price for my 06 plate 1.1 litre Kia Piccanto that the dealer was prepared to offer as a trade-in. The legal committment to sell wasn’t a problem for me as I knew I could back out if the offer price was dropped on inspection, and the inspector came to my house to look at the car, meaning I was on home turf and wouldn’t feel pressured into accepting a lower offer. Transaction agreed, I was able to check the money was in my account before signing the V5. Given that the company incur costs to do this, I think it’s fair for them to ask you to commit to selling if the price offered meets the initial online quote. All-in-all, I may have got slightly more for a private sale, but this was a fast, convenient and trouble free way for me to get a reasonable price for my car when the my new car dealer wasn’t interested in it as a trade-in. Additionally, all the staff I dealt with were courteous and polite. Interestingly, webuyanycar had offered slightly more, but I guessed from online research that the price would be likely to drop on inspection and it meant a trip halfway across Glasgow. I was very happy with my dealings with wewillbuyyourcar.

Guest
Dave King says:
31 January 2012

My car is due to be changed in couple of months so I thought I would check out these sites, Car is Honda CRV EX with Advanced safety pack, Mileage 81000 Went to webuyanycar.com and got quoted £11,375, thought this was not bad, This quote expired after 7 days and got email saying they have increased proces so should check out again, checked again and quoted £10,550, though what had changed in a day I do not know, New car I was interested was Volvo S60 R design, Cost new was £37,000, I looked at a low mileage one with 2,300 miles on clock and thought was ask webuyanycar to quote to see what they came back with. I got quote £15,300, I emailed to check this but got email back without any real answer as to why so low.
I also checked trademymotor on my car and they quoted £10001. Also checked wewillbuyyourcar but they refused to quote as mileage was over 80,000

Guest
S Hardie says:
1 February 2012

I was offered £900 trade in value for my 2002 plate corsa last November and went onto webuyanycar website to compare. They offered £675 less £49.99 selling fee so was going to get £625!! what a rip off!!! Needless to say I will not be selling any car to an online retailer, instead sell privately then trade in.

Guest
Dave Healey says:
3 February 2012

The problem I had was with the incorrectly named “We Buy Any Car”. I inputted my Car details, on several occasions. They don’t appear to buy any Car, I was just ignored. I didn’t get acknowledgement of reply of any sort.

I then contacted Trading Standards who were as much use as an Astray on a Motorbike. What a useless organisation! They told me, as “We Buy Any Car” had not made an offer they were not in a position to take any action.

What I was complaining to Trading Standards about was their claim – We Buy Any Car!!!!!
The problem I had was with the incorrectly named “We Buy Any Car”. I inputted my Car details, on several occasions. They don’t appear to buy any Car, I was just ignored. I didn’t get acknowledgement of reply of any sort.

I then contacted Trading Standards who were as much use as an Astray on a Motorbike. What a useless organisation! They told me, as “We Buy Any Car” had not made an offer they were not in a position to take any action.

What I was complaining to Trading Standards about was their claim – We Buy Any Car!!!!!

Guest
Dave Healey says:
3 February 2012

Dammed Computers. Just put a comment on the website. It’s repeated the text, don’t know why!!!!!!

Guest
Keith Denney says:
8 February 2012

I think this article is hilarious Claire Evans the editor has clearly stated that Webuyanycar have cleared their act up but it seems nearly everyone above still isn’t happy and they offered less for 4 out of the 6 cars than the other outfit so can she explain to me how they have cleaned their act up ??. Looks to me like she’s on a backhander from Webuyanycar.com to take the pressure of all the negative press and put it on to the next biggest players in line… its obvious to me after visiting them that these companies are going to take your car as cheap as possible as its a reverse selling process just like when you buy a car the dealer wants to sell it for as much as he can. These firms are for desperate sellers end of conversation…but I’m sure there was no desperate need for sale in Claire Evans house at Christmas after Webuyanycars remuneration LOL Has anyone ever thought to investigate the practices of Which because her report contradicts itself ?

Guest
Andrew says:
14 February 2012

Along similar lines, our eldest son disappeared to university last year but left his old motor rusting on the driveway. Months had passed, so we finally said enough was enough and decided to get rid of it. The local scrapyard offered £100 which we thought didn’t sound right, so we went online and got an offer from we buy any car.com, who we couldn’t believe offered half of that- £50! In the end we saw an advert on TV for a website offering to recycle scrap cars, CarTakeback.com, so we went on their website and were offered £230! Needless to say we snapped their hand off and the driveway is now clear.

Guest

I was offered £750 when I filled in the online form from We Buy Any Car.

When took the car to be viewed the following day, they lowered the offer to £200. We refused to sell and put in on eBay the same day. We had several bids and it went for £600 for a few days later.

Selling online was very good for me!

Guest
Rob says:
11 April 2013

We buy any car valued my 6 year old Focus 1.8 TDCI (88k miles) at £1,700 via their online valuation tool. I took careful account of the damage on the vehicle to ensure the online quote was as accurate as possible.

I took it to their Richmond inspection office 2 days before I had to leave the country (so I was very keen to conclude a sale of the vehicle- however, I did not tell the inspector this). He then examined my car, entered the results in his computer and re-valued the offer at £468. He tried to persuade me that the car was worth its market value, less the retail price of the work to bring the vehicle up to ‘brand new’ standard. Despite my desperation to sell, I refused his offer and the value told me I wouldn’t get any more for it elsewhere. He also subsequently called me to suggest a garage to get a cracked bumper fixed.

I drove the vehicle directly to the BCA auction site at Blackbushe. They were very helpful, entered my car for auction and I am pleased to say it sold for £2,000.

The £2,000 is not the highest possible price for the car and BCA’s fees are higher than the others. However, I got a fair market price for my car and I am happy to pay the higher fees to BCA because the actually provided a real service.

We Buy Any Car operate by

1/ offering what seems to be a reasonably good price on line and arranging an appointment; then

2/ Making you take the vehicle to a site which is hard to find and very unpleasant (i.e. you want to get out of their as fast as possible-* see my description of the Richmond experience below)

3/ Then making a very poor offer on the vehicle (ostensibly based on their valuation) which they know you are more likely to accept because 1/ you don’t know much about the value of the car (because you are using their website) 2/ you are desperate (its basically a fast payment service) and 3/ they’ve made their valuation site/ office unpleasant, almost mildly threatening so you are likely to sell at a poor price just to get out of there.

4/ If you sell, they will generally do nothing to the car, they simply take it to auction (which is something you can do yourself, very very easily) They therefore make their margin on both the fee they charge you for selling and on whatever margin they make on the car.

My experience of the Richmond we buy any car site was that it was a fenced in bit of waste ground with a couple of dodgy looking fellas hanging around. It is a locked gated area, not a good place to be for the more nervous of disposition, any one elderly, infirm or visiting in the dark! The valuer later told me the whole site was covered by security cameras ‘which had clocked me and the car on the way in’, ostensibly not to reassure but to justify why he couldn’t negotiate on price after his inspection, which seemed very odd to me. The office they used was one of those temporary ‘rent an office space’ type arrangements- i.e. cheap, nasty and unpleasant

When I refused to sell the car for £468 and the valuer refused to negotiate, he became mono-syllabic, did not show me out and I spent 5 minutes trying to find my way out of the office.

All in all, it is fair to say that the ONLY thing we buy any car offered was a rapid sale. The price was very very poor, the experience unpleasant and they were directly dishonest in their implication that my car was not worth any more than what they had valued it at. They did not say ‘this is what it is worth to us’, they said ‘this is what it is worth’ implying the general market value.

My last comment is that anyone who out of hand dismisses what parkers/ glasses guides say about new and used car values is being disingenuous. Those guides are in fact the only real guideline on value in the market which are compiled from actual data.

Guest
Danny says:
31 May 2014

We’ll I had a fantastic experience with we buy any car. I was on the look for a new car and most places gave me roughly the same figure in p/x £8500. We buy any car website offered £9800 but I didn’t put down any damage on the form because I was busy and thought they wouldn’t offer a good price anyway. When I took it in they offered £9500 once all the dents and damaged wheel were taken into consideration. Yes I could have got an extra £1000 selling private but I really couldn’t be bothered with that. I know that years ago they offered me £3500 for a car I sold for £7500 but on this occasion they offered me the best deal.

Guest
sgrif21 says:
22 August 2014

I have just sold my 09 plate Ford ka to wee buy anycar depot at prestwick and can honestly say I had a good experience. Before selling my car to them I popped into Evans hallshaw in Motherwell where there customer service was poor when the car buyer finally met me some 40 min after my scheduled appointment time he offered me 1600 a car I was hoping to get around 3000 for needless to I walked away when I went to wee buy anycar I got just over 2600 after deductions including next day payment. Providing my payment arrives in my accounts later today I will be a happy customer.

Guest

Auto Trader price, for selling to a dealer, is £3100 for an 09 Ka (private would be £3600).

So you got 20% less, which is typical of we buy any car, and the reason for the article………..

Guest
John Eastwood says:
31 December 2015

There is mention that trading standards should look at these rip offs. the truth is that trading standards are a joke. If you can actually manage to talk to someone, they will open a case, take evidence and statements etc., invite the perpetrator to an interview under caution. Then send an email saying they are not proceeding with the case and will not reply to any further emails, phone calls, or letters by post. THE TRUTH IS THAT IF YOU DON’T GET RIPPED OFF IN THIS COUNTRY YOU ARE VERY LUCKY. TO THE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE WHO ARE RIPPED OFF EVERY DAY IN THIS GLORIOUS COUNTRY JUST THINK ITS PAYBACK BECAUSE WE RIPPED OFF THE PEOPLE IN THE EMPIRE FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS

Guest
Peter Lewis says:
26 April 2016

Thank Goodness i have no financial worries, or have no crippling depts.
My 11month old Audi A1 TDI Sport, bought new, and having covered a very low 4015 miles, with a recent full service at the main dealer, has been valued at a pityful £11150.

The main dealer themselves, were prepared to offer me £13600 to buy the car back, and apologised for a poor offer, but suggested i sell the car privately for around £15600.

It should be against the law for internet valuers to presume their giving often desperate customers, a fair value for their car.

Some people have no option but accept such low valuations, and many people are under the apprehension that their getting a fair deal.

No car,let alone a desirable Audi loses over £10k of its value in under a year.

Guest
hazel watson says:
24 June 2016

car ching made me an online offer of just over 1500 for my 2005 xtrail which was in reasonable condition, the price offered online for poor condition with mechanical or cosmetic faults was just over 1300. When I got there I was offered £800 for a car that is worth around £2500 – £3000 what a rip off. At the very least I would have expected the 1300 to be offered. Needless to say I told them where to stick it. What a rip off these online quotes are

Guest
Eddie Ellis says:
24 August 2016

Webuyanycar offered me £1,075 for my 58 plate mondeo tdci estate, which I will add was only bought a couple of months ago for £2,500 but due to a change in business direction I no longer need it.

I ignored the quote & today they e mail to me say “Great News” Mondeo’s are in higher demand & my car is now worth £1,270 really? second hand cars increasing in value, I think not! This is an obvious attempt to buy low & needs investigating by TS