/ Motoring

Barry Beavis: why I fought my parking penalty in court

Parking fine

When Barry Beavis was served with a £85 Parking Charge Notice by a private parking company, he wasn’t willing to just accept it and pay up. Here’s Barry himself on why he decided to fight the charge in court.

My name is Barry Beavis and I am involved in a legal battle that could save all motorists millions of pounds.

Parking tickets are a right royal pain the whotsit. We’ve all had a parking ticket and we’ve grudgingly paid what’s due. But are the charges actually fair?

There are two types of charge and two types of parking “ticket”. The first one is a parking ticket issued by your local authority, normally in the guise of a traffic warden or police officer. If you get one of these then you have usually done something wrong, as these are issued pursuant to the Road Traffic Act.

The second type of charge is for parking on private land. Something like a retail centre, a supermarket, an out of town shopping centre and cinema or even a hospital car park.

Fighting my parking penalty

I received one of these Notices from ParkingEye. I visited Riverside Retail Park in Chelmsford in April 2013. It offers motorists two hours free parking, but I had stayed for nearly three hours. I received a PCN (Parking Charge Notice) for £85 which I argued in a test case in Cambridge County Court was an unenforceable penalty, was not a genuine reflection of the parking company’s loss from motorists overstaying, and should not be allowed.

I had to research private parking companies to put together my defence in Cambridge. What I found made me so incredibly angry. I read experiences of people who had felt intimidated by letters asking them to pay the ‘fines’. This egged me on even more to fight my case on behalf of everyone who has been affected.

Yet, I lost. The judge ruled that there was a ‘commercial justification’ for the charges. New law was being written. Bad law, I think.

Taking it to the Supreme Court

I was amazed that the judge ruled against me. Contract law is simple in my opinion: if it’s a penalty then it is unenforceable. In my view, these parking companies had been getting away with it for far too long, yet here was a judge ruling in their favour. I was firstly shocked and then I became incensed; literally hopping mad.

I was given permission to appeal to the Court of Appeal and in February 2015 the case was heard. Last week the judgment was handed down.

Lord Justice Moore-Bick, Lord Justice Patten and Sir Timothy Lloyd agreed that the £85 charge is intended to deter motorists from overstaying in the car park. Yet, they also held – in an unprecedented ruling – that the charge is still enforceable as it is not ‘extravagant or unconscionable’. Simply put – £85 is not too much.

I have been given leave to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court. I think I should. Do you?

This is a guest post by Barry Beavis, who took ParkingEye to court to contest his parking ticket. All opinions expressed here are Barry’s own, not necessarily those of Which?. Which? intervened in the Court of Appeal proceedings to protect the wider consumer interest, to safeguard existing consumer rights and to ensure the law is fair for consumers across all markets.

21 July 2015 update – off to the Supreme Court

This case is now being heard in the Supreme Court. The hearing is due to end later this week, with a ruling not expected until later this year.

4 Nov 2015 update – Supreme Court Ruling

The Supreme Court today gave its judgement on Barry Beavis’ case. Disappointingly, he lost. Parking fines issued by private companies have been ruled as fair and proportionate by the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court agreed with Parking Eye that the £85 charge Barry received for overstaying by 56 minutes was justified as it discouraged people from overstaying at a site close to a railway station and law courts.

We intervened in the case to ensure important consumer rights that protect people from excessive fines in all sectors were not watered down. However, the ruling could now lead to people being more severely fined for things like missing appointments or being late for a nursery pick-up.

Our executive director Richard Lloyd said:

​​’This is a thoroughly disappointing judgment based on a narrow​ ​interpretation of the law. It will cause chaos if cowboy parking firms​ ​choose to take advantage of the ruling by hitting drivers with even​ ​more excessive charges. Our advice to consumers is to be on your guard​ ​and always appeal if you think a parking fine is unfair.’

We’re now planning to take the issue up with government ministers since a reversal of the judgment will require changes to the law.

Comments
Guest
P Mohan says:
30 September 2017

Has anyone thought of raising a petition for better regulations? I have just received one and didn’t realise how much private parking management companies are bullying, harassing and unnecessarily stressing out motorist with ridiculously excessive charges. At least with the council owned parking spots, they can be made to listen to reason and have clear requirements on how much they can charge and the process around it. I would be happy to start one so that the these companies are also forced to abide by the law that they seem to be exploiting but need at least 5 emails to get the petition started.

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Guest

Some of us have asked Which? to campaign for fairer more appropriate penalties. £20 has been suggested (or a suitable premium for a more expensive car park).

Guest

Please get this petition going, I have jus had a unfair parking charge notice, my appeal was rejected and escalated to debt collectors which had pushed fine up to £150. I would like to see all parking fines capped at £20.

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Guest

Hi P Mohan – You could start a petition here or publicise an existing petition: https://petition.parliament.uk

Guest
Castle says:
4 October 2017

If this was on private land then it’s not a fine; simply a claim for damages. Go to Moneysavingexpert or Pepipoo if you want further advice.

Guest
Castle says:
4 October 2017

There is a private member’s bill being scheduled for a second reading in February of next year called Parking (Code of Practice) Bill 2017-19 and is being sponsored by Sir Greg Knight. The Government has again failed to act on its manifesto promise to sort this out.

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Guest

Progress of the bill that Castle has mentioned can be found here: https://services.parliament.uk/bills/2017-19/parkingcodeofpractice.html

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Guest

Why do Which? not campaign on behalf of motorists?

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Guest

Hi Malcolm, we worked very closely with Barry on his case and have been working behind the scenes on this issue. We’re aware of this private members bill and will be keeping a close eye on its progress.

Our concentration with campaigns this week is the launch of our care homes campaign today, which our supporter Fred has written about for us: https://conversation.which.co.uk/health/care-homes-provision-service-cma/

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Guest

A problem for me and no doubt others is that we often have no clue about those issues that Which? is actively pursuing. Thanks to Patrick’s comment, we now know that parking penalties is now a live issue and may have been for the past two years. On the other hand we don’t know, for example, whether or not Which? is pursuing the problem that smart TVs often lose their smart functions within a few years of purchase.

I appreciate that any dormant issue could become live in future, especially with input from consumers, but it would be very helpful to know which issues are live at present. Any chance you could help us @patrick ?

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Guest

@patrick Thanks. Patrick. I know Which? contested the supreme court (?) decision. It would be useful to know just what the content of Sir Greg’s private members bill is, and whether it will address the size of parking penalities – in my opinion the main item to attack.

Guest
liz duggan says:
4 October 2017

Ive just received a parking charge notice from premier parks in falmouth for £60.00 which i feel is well overpriced,then they also have the audacity to charge me an extra £1.80 to cover processing fees,this is just a joke.

Guest
Barry Whitley says:
13 October 2017

I would very much like to sign a petition concerning excessive parking fines from private companies as it is legalized theft we are actually talking about. I would also like to try and promote others to sign.

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Guest

I am trying to start a petition on Change.org but am having to try and sort out problems actually launching the petition at the moment. Hopefully up and running shortly. Private Parking companies need controlling. At the minute they have total control of the law with the result that the public are subject to legalized theft.

Guest
bishbut says:
4 October 2017

Car parking charges complaints ? the cost of parking ? think about using public transport ? just work out how much it costs each day to travel everywhere by car everyday ! then find out the cost of using public transport instead ,add the less hassle of driving on congested roads .Walk a short distance ,it will benefit you .I know it is not the thing everyone is able to do some do need a car for travel Only use your car when absolutely necessary not just because it is the thing to do and is convenient to do so THINK MORE ALL THE TIME

Guest
Vincent Edwards says:
5 October 2017

I agree the world would be a better place if we drove less and walked/cycled/used public transport/stayed home more. But the likes of Parking Eye are not in business for the purpose of improving the environment or benefiting our health. Car park companies want our money and their business model is based upon imposing large penalties for often miniscule breaches of time limits. This is a self-regulated (i.e. unregulated) industry. The car park companies make the rules, enforce the rules and keep the spoils – legislature, judge, jury and executioner – a massive conflict of interest. Whatever you feel about people driving when they could be travelling by other means (and I am a member of my local Pedestrians Association and cycle to work) do you think it just to grant quasi-judicial powers to ex-car clampers – which is effectively what this misguided legislation and the Beavis case have done?

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Guest

My daughter is currently embroiled in a parking dispute with Parking Eye. She visited the Butterfly Maze in Symonds Yat, which is part of the Wye Valley Visitor Centre, Ross-on-Wye, on 10th April 2017. She had been there so many times before that my grandson was greeted by his first name by the staff at the Centre and there had never been any issue regarding car parking. However, since her previous visit, control of the car park had been handed over to Parking Eye and the “rules” had apparently changed. When she went to pay, at the end of the visit, a check on her watch showed that she was inside the cut-off time for the next charge level. She duly paid what was indicated as the charge for up to 4 hours. The site owners state that a refund of £2 was available for those who had used the facilities at the Centre, so she went into the shop with her paid-up ticket and was given the £2 refund. Neither the ticket machine, nor the person who gave the refund gave any indication of underpayment or overstaying. Several weeks later, my daughter received a letter from Parking Eye, stating that she had overstayed the paid-for time and she owed a Parking Charge of £100. The claim states that her car left the site 4 hours and 13 minutes after it entered the site.

My daughter wrote to Parking Eye, to dispute the claimed overstay, convinced that she had been within the specified time limit. Her “appeal” against the charge was forwarded to POPLA, the (allegedly) independent assessors of parking fine disputes. They found in favour of Parking Eye and included in their reasons that the signage at the Wye Valley Centre clearly stated what the rules were (this was based on what were claimed to be photographs of the signs provided to POPLA by Parking Eye, copies of which my daughter has not been sent) , despite the fact that, as our subsequent investigations revealed, many appeals in the same year had been allowed, on the basis of inadequacy of signage. Our investigations also revealed that the Parking Period at this site commences at the instant that your car passes the vehicle registration number recognition camera, at the site entrance, not when you purchase a ticket and the Parking Period ends as your vehicle passes a similar camera as your wheels leave the entire site, not when you pay into the parking machine. In order to obtain the refund, my daughter had to pay the correct parking charge and then go into the Wye Valley Centre shop, where she had to queue for some time before the refund was authorised and paid to her. As stated, previously, neither the machine, nor the shop assistant indicated that she had underpaid, or overstayed. Without having to queue for the refund, she would almost certainly have left the site within the specified time limit, which we now understand is 10 minutes after the “cut-off” time.

We looked at the Facebook page for the Wye Valley Centre and found a very large number of complaints from customers who had been “ripped off” by this parking system, which many stated was deliberately designed to entrap customers. When we revisited this Facebook page, two weeks ago, we found that it no longer available and it no longer contained the large number of negative comments about the parking systems. We also looked at TripAdvisor, on which there were huge numbers of complaints about the “rip-off” parking system, at this site. These comments are still available to view.

My daughter has now received a very threatening “Letter Before County Court Claim”, from Parking Eye. In this letter, they refer to the Supreme Court decision in their favour, against Mr Beavis and they also refer to the POPLA decision rejecting my daughter’s appeal grounds. I downloaded the Supreme Court Ruling and that decision was clearly made on whether the charges were “fair” and whether they represented a “penalty”, rather than a breach of contract. No mention is made of the fairness of the timing systems, or the clarity of the instructions to customers. Interestingly, the Supreme Court Ruling notes that Parking Eye would not make a profit without these excess charges for breach of parking rules. I contacted POPLA, who, after protracted discussion, stated that they are a one-off appeal operation and they do not engage in appeals against their rulings. I asked to see copies of the signage photographs on which their decision had relied and they said that they could not supply copies to us and these should have been sent to my daughter with the appeal form, by Parking Eye. They were not.

It seems to me that, bearing in mind the very large number of complaints about this (and possibly other) Parking Eye controlled car parks a “Class Action” on behalf of all the victims of this shoddy practice represents the best way to put an end to it. I should be interested to hear from others who have been similarly affected.

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Guest

I would be pleasantly surprised if this problem could be solved by legal action. It is rooted in an awful piece of legislation – Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, Schedule 4. I was astonished when I read it. I did not think we had legislation like it in this country. I can only imagine it was drafted by the British Parking Association (BPA) and adopted in its entirety by the Cameron government on a Friday afternoon after all the government lawyers had gone home. The Act allows parking firms to do pretty well anything they like, so they are not likely to fall foul of the law. The only restriction is that to have access to DVLA records they must be a member of the BPA. The BPA has a code of practice which itself is far from exacting from its members’ point of view though it does suggest (not insist) they limit the charge/fine to a mere £100.

In the Beavis case six of the seven Supreme Court judges showed a remarkable ignorance of the way the system was working in practice and displayed am amazing lack of common sense. One judge did get it right, but he was out-voted.

So at the moment the law is very much on the side of Parking Eye et al. They are acting legally. It needs to be changed by politicians following sensible consideration of how the reasonable aim of restricting time spent in a private car park can best be achieved. My feeling is that in the majority of cases a penalty-based system in unnecessary to achieve this aim, though of course it is the most profitable and cheapest to run (see my posting from earlier this year). If a fundamental change in the law leads to the bankruptcy of a number of parking firms few tears will be shed.

While considering this issue, perhaps attention can be paid to local authority car parks – do so many of them need to be pay and display when they could be pay on exit? Again, pay and display is cheap to run and highly profitable. But it is irritating to use and can damage trade in a town centre – people rush back to the car for fear of getting an overstay ticket when they might spend more time shopping, to the benefit of local traders. At a time when town centres are dying, that extra purchase could make all the difference. Just a thought.

Guest
bishbut says:
9 October 2017

What do Judges know about practical things they just have to follow what it say in law They NEED some common sense it all judgements but do not appear to have any

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Guest

The parking companies have the law on their side, it’s appalling. I am trying to get a petition going concerning parking fees. Please sign the petition if you agree.
https://www.change.org/p/the-general-public-control-of-the-so-called-parking-cowboys/fbog/159620849?recruiter=159620849&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=share_for_starters_page&utm_term=triggered

Guest

I agree with this. I resent having to pay to shop or eat. I got a ticket for being 2 minutes over. It was 18.28 and parking charges ended at 18.30.
I also got a pcn for parking with my wheel 1″ on the slanted paving of the entrance to a driveway.
The silliest rule on Euro carparks notice board in sainsbury is that you can’t return within 2 hours so if you forget to buy something you can’t go back to get it.
Laws have got to change. It has cost me almost £150
In one month. Let’s all bombard our MPS to deal with this problem on our behalves.

Guest
Mark Summerton says:
8 October 2017

I have just received a £100 parking charge notice from The Range car park in St. Helen’s (£60 if paid within 14 days), for parking 32 minutes over the 2 hour limit. It’s absolutely disgusting they can get away with this daylight robbery.

Guest
bishbut says:
9 October 2017

councils etc. are only interested in charging those who overstay in car parks and could not care less about dangerous and illegal parking on the streets and roads in towns villages and cities Drivers can park anywhere the want to without any punishment at all Ask drivers of large vehicles the problems they have with these just abandoned cars and vans

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Guest

It varies from place to place, but in general I agree with bishbut. In the English town where I used to live a motorist overstaying by the smallest number of minutes in a City Council-run Pay &Display car park was guaranteed a ticket from their super-vigilant wardens. The best place to park, from the financial point of view, was straddling the yellow lines and pavement outside the car park, where the wardens responsible for on-street parking (employed by a private company on behalf of the County Council) never trod. Public safety was the last consideration.

Much the same applies to this discussion. Park in a dangerous position on the street and the chances are nothing will happen. Overstay by a minute in a privately-run car park or a council P&D car park, endangering nobody, and an overstay ticket is inevitable – especially where ANPR cameras are used.

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Guest

Apparently ANPR cameras can no longer be used in council car parks.

Guest
geraldine bishop says:
10 October 2017

I’m very interested in all your comments.I hsve a dilemma at the moment.In january 2015 I recieved a parking fine as a result of overstaying parking time.Not aware of this at the time.Wrote back to the parking company explaining my position and hoped common sense would prevail.I have a son who has Downs Syndrome.He had a dental appointment at the community dentist.There were no parking spaces available at the dentist so parked in the car patk for main shopping area.My son was going there for sedation to have a filling.He had previously had a fearfull experience at the local hospital day surgery when he had to have some teeth out.We were both stressed I suppose and I have to say that when his appoinment was finished went to the shops as his passion is collecting dvds and hot wheels cars.Think parking was the last thing I was thinking about really.I wrote to the company snd ecplained what had happened.They did’nt want to know.Oh by the way, firstly I asked for photographic proof as I could’nt really believe what was happening.I wrote back saying I believe their charges were unreasonable as in theory the car park was not full and I pressume most cars in there have the 2 hours free parking and leave so they had’nt really lost money as they were claiming.The next thing was a solicitors latter.I wrote back explaining to them and said I had sent a copy of my son’s dental appointment to the parking company.No reply from solicitors so I assumed they had accepted my explanation and were no longer going to persue this.Fast forward 2 years snd this saturday I recieved a County Court Notice for Northampton Court.So do I pay the fine which is now 284.00 or go to court to try and defend this and risk possible being stung for court costs on top of fine plus being given a CCJ.Realise now I should have appealed to the parking fines arbitrators, think on is called Pop but as I had a genuine reason for overstaying I though common sense and compassion would prevail but obviously not.The parking area was Jansel Square, Aylesbury.Would appreciate any comments.Thank you.

Guest
Castle says:
10 October 2017

Geraldine; if you register with MoneySavingExpert.com, (MSE), you should find some help on the “Parking Tickets, Fines and Parking forum. (PS-you should avoid using your own name as the Parking company may take copies of your postings).

Guest
bishbut says:
13 October 2017

Parking companies do not have common sense or any compassion the just want your money and It will do everything they can (legally or illegally to get it It’s just easy get money for them

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Guest

Thank you so much for advice.

Guest
joe morris says:
12 October 2017

hi anyone , can someone advise me on a parking fine situation i was at a family gathering then i was in formed that parking attendents was on the prow, so we moved all the cars away and they were happy were we moved them too, now today i recived a fixed penelty for parking on double yellow lines (i was not on the road or lines ) but they informed ourselfs on the night in question noboby will get a fine ? so i looked at the evedence ie one photo with my car number plate blanked out and no ticket on window ? areint they supposed to put tickets in window and take photos ? please can anyone give me some advice many thanks

Profile photo of Alex Whittle
Guest

Hi Joe, please have a look at our advice about parking tickets.

http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/l/parking-tickets

This should give you some answers to your question and there’s also a really helpful tool to help you appeal the decision.

I hope this helps 🙂

Guest
Bridget says:
16 October 2017

I have recently received two PCN’s from a private car park. Both incidents were for June 2017 (4 Months ago) Can anybody advise what the timescales are for these notices to be sent out?

Guest
Castle says:
16 October 2017

6 years if they want to hold the driver liable, but a maximum of 56 days if they want to hold the registered keeper liable.

Guest
Bridget says:
18 October 2017

These PCN are from parkingeye, (camera) do you know if this still the case. Trying to get as much info together before appealling.

Guest
Charlie says:
16 October 2017

My mum lives in a estate where we have phone up the people to give us tickets to fill out when we visit. It has 4 parking bays so one visit we parked elsewhere whilst displaying the tickets that we normally do. One because the bays were full and two because we have a little one so bringing out his pram and all our clothes for the weekend make it a bit easier taking it from the car to the block. So we ended up getting a ticket for not parking in the marked bays. We ignored it and now have to pay double which is 100 pound. Is there anyway to contest this or do I not stand a chance.

Guest
bishbut says:
17 October 2017

No one has a Legal right to park on a public highway Roads were built for driving on not for parking It seems things have changed Roads are for parking on it’s hard luck at times if you want to use a road for driving Parking rules are never enforced unless you over stay you allotted parking time then you get fined heavily

Guest
mdlcth says:
18 October 2017

Does anyone have advice about being issued with a PCN (Eurocarparks) because their meter charging process was unclear? I have today received a PCN having (I thought) paid for a ticket on a new parking meter in our local shopping centre. I followed the on-screen instructions regarding inputting my license number and length of stay, submitted my card for payment and thought all was done. Apparently I must not have followed the process accurately as payment was not taken and therefore I have now been charged. No ticket was issued but I thought that this was (stupidly perhaps) because having inputted my licence number they were using CCTV licence recognition technology as the record as this is now in more common usage. I would like to appeal the charge as I don’t believe the on-screen instructions/process were sufficiently clear but am not sure how this can be argued.

Guest
John walsh says:
19 October 2017

My granddaughter has just received a Pcn 17/10/17 for a offence which happened in Aug 2015. The first letter was addressed to her husband who is the owner of the car but she was driving at the time. He rang the firm to tell them he wasn’t driving at the time and would they provide proof. They never replied until now which was an order to pay the court. Is this legal?

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Guest

Good morning, John. I would suggest you have a look at our advice on parking tickets for some more information. You’re allowed to request proof, as you have done, and if that wasn’t provided then it may be worth challenging. Here’s our advice: http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/advice/ive-been-issued-a-parking-ticket-for-parking-on-the-street

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Guest

There’s a lot if people asking if it is worth fighting a parking ticket, and if you think it was issued unfairly then the answer is simple… yes! Have a look at our brand new advice here if you’re unsure of what your next steps should be : https://www.which.co.uk/news/2017/10/why-its-worth-fighting-that-unfair-parking-ticket/

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Guest

@awhittle, see two particular aspects to parking tickets. One is whether it is worth contesting one. The second is the size of the penalty payment, and the charge for delayed payment, which can go to three figures.

It is usually fair to make a charge for parking and to enforce it, otherwise parking will be abused by some. But for contravention, or not displaying a “free period” ticket, a £60+ penalty is out of proportion to the offence. In my view this creates much of the ill-will among people who have transgressed and would probably pay a more sensible charge without quibbling. I would like Which? to campaign for fairer penalties, and would suggest £20 except in more expensive car parks where it should be related to the day’s charge perhaps.

Guest
Dave Plowman says:
21 October 2017

My wife has just received a parking ticket issued by ParkingEye at a local leisure centre she uses every Friday. The ticket states that she didn’t buy a ticket, the offence was the 28th July 2017 but wasn’t issued until 17th October 2017 meaning it was 81 days before the penalty notice was sent. This car park is notorious for what can only be described as “erroneous penalties” and so she generally keeps her parking ticket as proof for at least a month but of course she hasn’t kept them all the way back to July. Does anyone know if there is a legal time frame for penalty notices to be issued after which they are not valid? I would appreciate any information as this seems to be crazy that a parking company can issue tickets so long after the so called offence, meaning your right to appeal is diluted as you don’t have the proof or indeed the recollection of what happened.

Guest
Sarah Duffey says:
22 October 2017

Id like to know too! Same company has issued me 2 PCNs today but the date for the penulties were months ago. one was in August and one was in July

Guest
Castle says:
22 October 2017

It’s 14 days if they are using ANPR cameras and 56 days if they leave a ticket on your car.

Guest
john purnell says:
21 October 2017

we were on holiday in Devon and have been issued a parking charge from PCN Parking solutions as this was private land apparently. They have asked for £60 and two weeks to appeal. They appear to be members of the IPC . They have sent this notice with no proof as they say they have recorded our entry and exit on cameras. However there is no photographs attached to the notice so we cant be sure of what time we arrived or left they printed thier letter giving an exit time but no arrival time. We have no experience of this type of arrangement using cameras to record our arrival/departure times we just expected their to be wardens patrolling like we have here in Wiltshire. We didn’t realise this when we bought our ticket but honestly didn’t look for any signs which may have indicated it as frankly we didn’t think it was different than all the other car parks we have used. Should we appeal on these grounds that a-we didn’t realise they used cameras and
b- there is no evidence and should we ask them for the photos and do they have to send them to us? thanks. JOhn

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Guest

as an addition to my original comment on PCN just realised that I cant find PCN Parking Solutions as being registered with anybody -not sure also how they sent the demand to our address in the first place? Anyone any idea how this can happen? John

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Guest

@johnpurnell Do you have any more info on Parking Solutions? Address, email, phone number?

Looking at members on the IPC website, there is a PCN (NW) and several **** Parking Solutions but not the 2 names together.

I was wondering if this was a scam but they are on http://www.solutionlabs.uk/index.html

Funny though it says “The Parking Charge Notice needs to be available for the motorist to manage immediately…..”

Guest
bishbut says:
22 October 2017

Leave your car at home walk or go by public transport then you will not get parking tickets a simple solution

Guest
Alan Kellett says:
23 October 2017

We parked for a picnic lunch at Cotswold Water Park. At the parking machine paid our £1 coin inserted registration number. No ticket issued sign said no need to display so assumed no ticket needed. On return were met by a Baywatch parking ticket £60 prompt payment or £100. Appealed to Baywatch who said no record. To appeal to Popla would risk £100 fine. So paid and have appealed not hopeful this is a scam!

Guest
Castle says:
23 October 2017

Yes it’s a scam; in order to appeal to POLA you will need a 10 digit code which has to be provided by Baywatch. Since you have paid Baywatch they won’t give you the code; so you can’t appeal to POPLA.