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The rising challenge of fraud and cybercrime

Fraud

Have you been affected by fraud? Here’s Commander Chris Greany on the rising challenge of fraud and what the police are doing about it.

It seems to me that the UK is currently awash with people becoming a victim of some type of fraud. In my role as national Police Coordinator for Economic Crime, I see the heartache that fraud causes to many people, especially to the elderly and vulnerable.

Fraud has many faces, but almost all exist on one or two key principles. The first is an offer that looks real or true to entice you to be curious. The second is a convincing story that supports the first. And the third is the fear of losing something or missing out. I have said for some time now that ‘if it looks too good to be true, it’s probably fraud’.

The police response

The City of London Police is the national policing lead for fraud. This means that when a person or a business is a victim of fraud or cybercrime, we have the reporting mechanism to deal with this nationally. And that reporting mechanism is Action Fraud. It’s the only national reporting system in the world and we’re investing more money into its activities as the demand increase.

With the information we get we try to support police forces nationally to investigate some of this crime. I say ‘some’ because much of this fraud originates from outside the UK and it’s sometimes difficult to apprehend all offenders. Fraudsters are liars. Everything they present is false, fake, so tracking them down is often a greater challenge than it looks.

The internet is unregulated and it can be a dangerous place, with websites presenting opportunities for fraudsters to take advantage of. Alongside the UK internet registrar, the City of London Police takes approximately 4,000 fake websites offline a month. These are websites that are designed to steal your ID, credit card details and ultimately your money.

We also run an active defence prevention centre which looks at the crimes as they come in and gets prevention messaging out to victims through a whole host of different channels.

The fake phone call

Computer-enabled fraud, fake websites and malware are also of serious concern, but many frauds are still conducted by someone giving you a call.

A person phones you saying they’re from your bank, or email provider, or an investment company. And this may happen over many phone calls, not just one. Persistence is another technique fraudsters use.

They may also know information about you to try and convince you that they’re genuine. We forget that much of our personal information is freely available to anyone, via the voters register, phone directories, social clubs and so on. In essence, the research can be done from someone’s armchair, which means it all sounds very convincing when they call you.

At this point you’re vulnerable to parting with further information, or transferring money or allowing someone to access your computer. Stop and think for a moment… take a breath… ask a friend. If it’s genuine, the caller won’t mind. Most of all, be suspicious. Is this all sounding a bit too good to be true?

If you get a call like this, from someone claiming to be from you bank or email provider, here’s what to do:

  • If they ask for your name, don’t answer. Instead, ask them ‘who are you and what is your name? Because you’re calling me out of the blue and I don’t know who you are.’
  • If they do then say where they’re from and it’s a company you do business with, say ‘Thanks, I am now putting the phone down and I will call your fraud department back.’
  • The next step is to find the number for the company from trusted records (eg bank statement) and to call them from a different phone. If their previous call was legitimate they will let you know. If they don’t know anything about it, then you’ll know someone has been trying to trick you.

It’s not always that easy to put the phone down, but legitimate organisations will completely understand. So don’t be embarrassed to say ‘no’, hang up and call back on another phone. It’s in your best interest.

Have you ever been called by a scammer pretending to be from your bank or another company? What did you do?

This is a guest contribution by Commander Chris Greany, Police Coordinator for Economic Crime. All opinions are Chris’s own, not those of Which?

Comments
Guest
Colin Williams says:
18 April 2016

One of the problems that the banks do not seem to take seriously is the problem of shoulder surfing at cash points. A large minority of customers make no attempt to protect the key pad from those close by as they enter their PIN and it is easy to see the numbers they enter. It would be so easy for banks to put a screen around the pad so it is difficult for others to see the PIN entered. At cash points they could be easily added after installation. The same applies to most, but not all, key pads in shops. Our daughter was shoulder surfed some years back when chip and PIN was still considered to be infallible.

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

Hello, best thing to do is memorise where the numbers are on the pad, then covering it with your whole hand while pressing the buttons, know one will be able to read them then,
Best wishes, Chris

Profile photo of John Ward
Guest

Getting cashback from the supermarket is my way of avoiding using ATM’s in public places. I often have no alternative but to use the self-service ticket machine at the railway station when buying a ticket but visibility of the key-pad is easily blocked by one’s body position.

Guest
Colin Williams says:
18 April 2016

Sadly, they are almost as bad. When entering their PIN few cover the there hand as they enter the PIN, but fortunately the numbers are smaller and less easy to see. Most shop pads can now be taken off their holder and held close but most customers do not do this. do this?

Guest
Alan Gray says:
4 May 2016

What about the recent fraud against the taxpayers of the UK perpetrated by David Cameron to the tune of £9 million for the propaganda leaflets he had organised , printed and sent out for the remain in campaign, or should I say telling his lies about what would happen if the UK left the corrupt union. Is that going to be investigated as it should be and deserves to be?

Guest
J Wilson says:
4 May 2016

The reporting system on the Action Fraud website is itself unsafe, and when I tried to report that to them they weren’t even prepared to look into it. On the 4th April inst, they claimed that:-

“The Attempted Scams or Viruses tool does not currently use HTTPS, as no personal information is stored on it. ”

However, they completely missed my point which was that the address of https://reportlite.actionfraud.police.uk/ , apart from claimg to be a ‘Secure website’, contrary to what they then told me above.

On Google at least, it also comes up with a red diagonal line through the https part, and next to that the ‘padlock’ also has red cross through it. And if you hover the cursor over that and click it, the details about this are revealed and it tells you that “Your connection to reportlite.actionfraud.police.uk is encrypted using an obsolete cipher suite”.

So if the Governments ‘Watchdogs’ can’t keep up to date, then how can we be secure ourselves when we don’t have the same expertise or even financial resources to protect ourselves. The onus therefore must be on the State and the Financial Sector to comply with all of our Human Rights. #TIBOHR and vote for the campaigns on those if you read this and haven’t seen the yet.

Guest

Considering that the Action Fraud website itself is insecure, this is really unsound advice, especially when its coming from their ‘Commander’, who is no doubt very well paid compared to the rest of us.

But when I tried to point this out to Action Fraud themselves i was given short shrift and simply told that “The Attempted Scams or Viruses tool does not currently use HTTPS, as no personal information is stored on it. “, Which is contradicted by the fact that their address line suggest that it is ‘secure’ because it is https://reportlite.actionfraud.police.uk/ unless that’s already been hacked too.

However, the point which I was trying to make that they completely missed, is that on Google search engine at least, the ‘https’ part comes up with a diagonal red line through it, which is a warning sign, and the padlock also isn’t ‘green’ and instead has a red cross on it.

If you click on that padlock, you also get a ‘window’ which tells you beside the ‘green padlock’, that the website itself “is encrypted using an absolute cipher suite”. So why can’t the Police, use some of their resources to ensure that their own websites are fully secure and using the latest encryption methods, even if the information requested or stored on this one isn’t allegedly personal.

How can the rest of us feel safe in their hands, or even those of our so called ‘secure holders’ of any of our personal information, if the Government and all of its bodies, can’t keep their own houses in order, let alone enforcing our rights anywhere, such as those included in this latest report too http://metro.co.uk/2016/05/04/millions-of-gmail-hotmail-and-yahoo-email-account-details-stolen-in-huge-cyber-attack-says-security-expert-5858864/ ?

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Guest

You are both right the website is listed as insecure .ISP Amazon .inc , there are a number of jscripts but I didnt see any tracking cookies . For those worried about HTTPS get -https everywhere and -no script as well I have both and many other apps for protection ,although no script can cause problems on some sites . I agree, a police information and reporting website thats insecure ?? certainly makes you think how much they care about the British public . Its open to information gathering worldwide .

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Guest

While the –Report Fraud link (once you reach the web-page ) is insecure , in the interests of level reporting I have to say the link for -Scams + Viruses is secured by Comodo .

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Guest

Using a special American checker the only thing I found untoward about Report Fraud is that you are blocked from getting -HTTP information but you would expect that from a police website.

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

Hello, thought I would comment here…I’m not sure what my salary has to do with it, my pay is the same as all my other colleagues nationally at this rank, it is fixed, set by an independent pay body. For that you get me for about 24 hrs a day like now ..!!!

On a more serious note, the Action Fraud reporting tool is safe, however there is a contact centre you can call as well if you would prefer, it does take longer due to the scale of reporting we have.
All fraud reports are encrypted with HTTPS using Comodo RSA. The certificate is valid until November 2016.
If you are using Firefox browser the padlock is Green. There are some bugs with Chrome, but it should be fine with IE11.
If you click the padlock you can see the certificate for your self.
We are in a policing environment as well. Hope that helps ?

best wishes,

Chris

Guest
Bill Baird says:
18 April 2016

The biggest problem I have is the new so called contact-less debit & credit cards, where on earth did the banks get the idea that they were safe they the biggest con going and a lot of elderly people don’t even realize that they even have one of the cards and what can be paid for with them along with how easy it is to scam the cards people could loose hundreds of pounds without even knowing, and if they were like what I was and did not get a chance to say that I didn’t want one of these cards and had to contact the bank and ask to get it changed which meant I didn’t have any access to my money in my account for an extra week due to this it should be if you want a contact-less card you have to request it not the other way around.

Profile photo of John Ward
Guest

You are right Bill, but a contactless card can only be used up to five times before the PIN has to be entered, the fraudulent user has to be in physical possession of the card, and they are only valid for purchases up to £30. The worrying aspect for me is that one only has to hover the card in proximity to the terminal for the payment to go through. I don’t know whether payment might be made twice for the same transaction but you need to exercise great care if your intention is to put the card in the machine and enter your PIN.

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Guest

But we are already aware that hacking PINs is actually not as difficult as it was thought to be. On that basis the card could go another ten purchases ….

However there is a major point that leaves me worried. If I use nt contactless card on the Tube daily then it is possible that I will be in middle of the week hustling through the turnstile and it may not work. Now ask yourself is this likely or is their a dispensation for LT for this low price low transaction payment.

I am willing to bet quite a lot that a contactless card will only require a PIN re-entry when itis used where PIN machines are available. I should point out I making no special study of contactless cards I am just applying a commercial logic to a payment system.

Profile photo of John Ward
Guest

You could well be right DT – I have not seen any explanation of how the multiple use limit applies when using entry gates where there is no chip-&-PIN facility. If someone got hold of your card they could possibly make many journeys before you were aware of the loss but probably not many purchases.

As Bill said above, people can request not to have a contactless payment card although the banks might be making that difficult. I agree with him that they should only be supplied on request, not by default.

I suppose there are statistics on fraudulent use of contactless cards but I haven’t seen any. Personally I wouldn’t use a contactless debit or credit card on the London Underground, I would carry on using my Oyster card, but if you need a credit facility for travel there is no real alternative. The beauty of Oyster is that it so easy to look up your journey history and check the use of the card; I am not sure you would get much useful detail on a bank or credit card statement.

The more we rely on instant non-cash payment facilities the more necessary it is to have the telephone numbers to hand for notifying and cancelling missing cards. Time is of the essence.

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Guest

That is also a concern of my own, John – I tend to check my receipt to make sure that I haven’t paid twice, but I still think that a ‘slight of hand’ could be used to make a double charge. There seems to be little advantage to these things anyway.

Guest
marjorie says:
18 April 2016

I totally agree with Colin Williams, it is so easy to read the numbers they are entering – and most of them are elderly! – Easy targets

Guest
alan lea says:
18 April 2016

As I see it, the weak link in this is the banks themselves. Let me explain. To open a bank account you are required to provide various pieces of information to ensure that you are who you say you are and live where you say you live. My experience is that there is a cursory glance of such docs and then the account is opened. So using this llaissez faire attitude a scammer opens an account into which he is going to get you (or him/herself if he has got your bank details) to transfer your money. You find out too late it’s a scam. You go to the scammer’s bank to get their details and you hit a wall of “Sorry, under Data Protection Laws we cannot give you any information” . Effectively, the bank is acquiescing to a criminal act. Is it not time that, if it is true what the banks say about data protection, that a change is made to the law to allow those that have been scammed the right to examine the thoroughness of the banks checks prior to opening the scammer’s account and also to details of the scammer? I suspect, in reality, this is exactly what the banks don’t want because it could leave them open to possible legal redress.

Profile photo of Patrick Taylor
Guest

Just to cheer everyone up on how fast things change …

” It’s one of the most personal ten-digit numbers in your life, but that’s all a hacker needs to listen in on your phone calls, read your text messages, and track your location.
A new report by sister-site CBS News’ “60 Minutes,” broadcast Sunday evening after two years in the making, shows how millions of smartphones users are vulnerable to eavesdropping and surveillance — despite advancements in protections on most phones.

It’s done by exploiting a flaw in Signaling System No. 7 (SS7), a little-known but crucial system that brokers information between phone networks. SS7 handles that translation every time you send a text or make a call.
By targeting SS7, an attacker can see almost everything that passes through the system.

German security researcher Karsten Nohl, who revealed the flaw more than two years ago at a hacker gathering in Hamburg, said the flaw still exists. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which regulates the cellular space, is said to have done nothing since it first begun looking into the flaw. ……
April 16th2016
zdnet.com/article/how-hackers-can-listen-in-on-your-calls-and-read-your-texts/

Guest
Hazel Coram says:
18 April 2016

I share Colin Williams’ concern about shoulder surfing to the point where we no longer use cashpoints in open public spaces. His bank (HSBC) allows him to draw money at the Post Office. My bank doesn’t so I use the quick transfer function to send money to his account and he draws the relevant sum for me at the Post Office just 2 miles away. Safe, secure and virtually impossible to be overlooked.
The Post Office can be used to draw cash from most major bank accounts – it is worth a thought if you are concerned about cashpoints.

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Guest

I have been in dispute with a major UK company having been mis-sold a product over the phone. I refuse to agree to anything with them by phone and they refuse to communicate by email so it is written correspondence by post. A while back I received a phone call from a withheld number. The caller did not address me by name, had no customer service skills, but referred to correspondence I was having with the company regarding my complaint. The caller then said that before proceeding further I need to confirm my name. I refused and said that if they have called me then presumably they know who I am and have called the correct phone number. After a bit of argument over this, the caller did finally address me by name and then went on to provide a compensation offer. I informed him that I would not respond by phone and asked for the offer to be given in writing. I received nothing. Knowing this company had been hit by hacking I wasn’t sure if this was a scam, but if it was I was very concerned that they knew about my complaint. I wrote to the company who replied to confirm the offer in writing but completely failed to acknowledge that the behaviour of the caller was inappropriate. Nor did they apologise for tasking a member of staff to phone when I had previously requested the company not to use phone when corresponding about this matter. If we have major companies whose customer service standards are so awful, then it becomes even more difficult to distinguish between the genuine callers and the scammers.

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Guest

It is excellent to see the constructive engagement of Commander Greany here. But the figures for for phone and internet fraud are already horrendous and are rising significantly year on year despite the good work of Chris and his team . It does seem to me that the issue will only be addressed by far greater Government expenditure and international collaboration. Whether we have been directly affected by this issue or not, we all pay the costs indirectly. We should therefore be making sure that it features far more highly in political party manifestos in future. Yes, we all have a responsibility to take basic steps to try to keep safe, but at the end of the day the problem requires major political action to root out and punish the criminal.

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Guest

Beildman -major political action -music to my ears just what I have been going on about .

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

Hello, thanks for your comments, me and my team really give it everything, to do all we can. Fraud is everywhere sadly, with horrible criminals looking for every loophole to exploit. I’m doing all I can to push businesses to do more and we have lots of great successes. There are though many frauds that simply could be prevented if we all just took a minute to think, sometimes we are to quick to click ! I see many investment offers that are simply to good to be true and often it is probably be fraud..I am pushing for national fraud campaign as well

best wishes

Chris

Guest
Michael says:
20 April 2016

I have just read,with great interest,all the information, on your site.I was worried before, I’m terrified, now.I am a retired man, registered disabled and at first though the internet, a great help.
I feel I am now just a target, for every dodgy dealer, every time I turn on my device there is someone phishing or offering something which is too good to be true ,don’t trust any one,now.Thanks for the information, regarding , contactless cards,I’m off to change mine and go back to communicating by letter or face to face.

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Guest

Michael I am sorry to hear that (quite rightly ) you have been severely disillusioned with the Web and you have put in succinctly simple terms the truth of the WWW in 2016 .Used as a means of US government services originally it is now part of our everyday life (except yours of coarse ) . As such being American run profit and commercialism are now number 1 on the agenda being in most cases “forced down your throat ” -watched, data collected , by BB. the government (both countries ) your browser “maneuvered ” to commercial websites you dont want to go to , your system hacked for profit , etc.etc . Even “protection ” isnt really 100 % safe . The problem is Michael is this is the way “forward ” for all young people starting off in primary school ,it will soon be the only way to get money from a bank , to buy goods , etc in the future . In other words its making itself indispensable by government decree (allowing social change that profits not you but third parties ) Its a constant battle to stop all your info being used ,I have 3 separate blockers on trackers alone , jscript blockers and others like blocking ads etc and I dont use windows 10 – the spy network but LInux . I was surprised to find American law allows for the Internet to be shut down in the event of a National Emergency , as they “own it ” by default they can do that , do you know what one class of “national emergency ” is -total bank collapse in the US -now how would you get your virtual money then ? .In the UK once they start WW3 the UK internet would be shut down ,I dont know the position of banks collapsing in the UK , but the UK copies the US . This is a major strategic issue that the BRICS recognise and they are proposing a separate Internet . Our government and the US have “hidden ” Internet,s – say no more , in the event of the WWW being taken down.

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

Hello Michael,

Are you in the UK ? I will try and help you if i can by getting you some advice and support from my Economic Crime Prevention Centre if it helps..?

best wishes

Chris

Guest
Kee Rev says:
20 April 2016

Commander Greany and others are right. We have a resposibility too.
I always refuse all phonecalls from all cold callers, by phone, doorstep or mail, that I donot know.
These liars, thieves and junk merchants cannot offer anything that cannot be bought elsewhere. By direct contact at a competitive price too. Thus giving me someone to “cudle” by the throat if neccessary!
Should any of these scum repeat the contact, then they get enough abuse to fill their wate bins many times over.
After all, it’s my private time, place and environment, not a Public place. You can enjoy a most stimulating mental “workout” saying every non-PC thing you have had to keep pent-up, with no fear of repercussions since they are the invader of a Private place.
If they feel like asking their crook employers for a raise, to deal with this unpleasant flack, then so much the better.
Go Enjoy and protect your meagre resources by voicing your opinions to these useless wastes of oxygen.

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

yes, putting the phone down and saying a polite no at the door is the best way…!!

best wishes

chris

Guest
Rosemary says:
20 April 2016

I didn’t notice anyone mentioning the need to make sure that your telephone line is “clear” when phoning another number to determine that a caller is bona fide – I understand that a line can be kept open without you realising it. When I received what I thought was a bogus call, I dialled 123 (speaking clock) to make sure.

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Guest

I did Rosemary . I said they trick you by telling you to dial a number ,they put their phone on mute and most people just hang up lift off and redial –getting the same man or his accomplice . You did thec rightb thing by making sure the line was not held by dialing the speaking clock (although it cost you 50P ) iTs down to the time limit that an incoming caller can hold the line BT know about this and if you are with them contact them and they will reduce the hold on call time to milliseconds .If you are not with BT contact your telephone company as they will have their OWN equipment in BT,s exchange.

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Guest

always call from a different phone and from the number of the bank statement…

best wishes

chris

Guest
Smike says:
31 December 2016

The Commander has twice now enjoined ‘call from a different phone’. Whilst most will realize that he means ‘a phone with a different telephone number’ A few, particularly elderly with no mobile phone, will incorrectly think this to be an instruction to use a different extension in another room. Sorry to inject a pedantic observation into Chris’s first class input, but a false sense of security thus engendered could leave the user even more vulnerable.

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Guest

Our regional police offer an email service to notify subscribers of local crimes, related police events and advise on scams. The latest probably affects relatively few people but is an example:
“A new investment fraud trend is targeting members of the public who are seeking to sell their wine investment. Fraudsters agree to purchase the victim’s wine, but instead transfer the stock into their own account without paying the victim. The fraudulently obtained wine is then believed to be sold on to other, unsuspecting victims. ”
The more common frauds have been reported. This is a good proactive service and the message can easily be copied to friends, relatives and vulnerable people. The police are helpful!

Guest
J McG says:
4 May 2016

How do you even know if so called ‘Wine Investments’ are real. There was a report of that being just another Scam a good few years ago. I recall being phoned about that kind of thing about 15 years ago, and I had no idea of where they got my number. So I went ex-directory on that too, even before I went on Internet.

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Guest

the best thing is to avoid anything you are uncertain of… you can sign up to fraud alerts to at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/support-and-prevention/sign-up-to-action-fraud-alert

best wishes

chris

Guest
dieseltaylor says:
25 April 2016

Apparently a large number of 2millenials2 keep passwords and PINs on their smart phones [around 20% of blokes and half that for girls].

From a survey…

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Guest

OMG ! you are joking diesel?—-eh no ? – From what I know about mobile phone security and hackers this is utter madness . Please people DONT copy this .

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Guest

I have over thirty passwords in varying degrees of frequency of use – and I lead a simple life! I don’t keep passwords or PIN’s on my mobile phone but I cannot possibly memorise them all so they are recorded in a distributed manner and in cypher form. So far as I can see there is no solution to this problem that is 100% secure. People who do everything on line via their smart phone, tablet, or laptop need to call up their passwords from somewhere and the available options are limited. There are web-based and cloud applications that can be used but are they totally secure? I believe hacking is much more prolific than we tend to assume – for every successful hack there are probably a hundred failures which makes the hacker more persistent. Straying into Hogan-Howe territory here, I feel that a few people might have injudiciously drawn attention to themselves and attracted hacking, but no one is entirely safe from hacking and it remains a despicable criminal offence for which there is never any excuse or justification.

Guest
Derek Speight says:
4 May 2016

Why do they let these obvious fraudulent emails through when they could so easily block them ?
I believe the ISPs should be more proactive by preventing obvious scam, spam and phishing emails ever reaching our email inbox. For example, the ISPs and the Banks and HMRC should use a security code that they have agreed between them. Any email that has a reference to that Bank is checked by the ISP to see whether it has that code. If it hasn’t, it is trashed or sent to the bank for investigation.
Banks should also be more proactive.
I received an email about my credit card from HSBC that was addressed “Dear Customer”
It was signed by an ex employee ! I complained about this over three weeks ago and am still waiting for an explanation !

HMRC sent an email. I tried to check whether it was valid. The email address was not on their website as a valid email address and I was advised by email to send it to their Phishing address. I sent it their ‘Phishing’ department and they said it was OK ! I queried this with HMRC over two weeks ago and am still waiting for a response !

Guest
Max Newman says:
6 May 2016

Occasionally I’m forced to use a chip & pin machine in a store or petrol station that permanently attaches the machine/keypad on an elevated immobile mount where it is easier for the person behind you in the queue to see it than it is yourself. Also a lot of the keypads are so worn that it makes it difficult to obscure your keypresses.

I’ve also had a member of staff on the till at Sainsbury’s very quickly and without warning take my chip & pin card out of the machine and start handling it. They say they have to readjust the card due to faulty c&p machines. Not good enough – and it should be a requirement for a member of staff to at least ask before touching a c&p or payment card.

Guest
Josephine Bacon says:
17 May 2016

I have proof positive that my NHS records have been stolen and handed over to a “Claims Management Company”. The name I use in the NHS is different to my professional name and the name in my passport and I use it exclusively in the NHS. Yet I have been receiving calls from a company called Stanton Fisher who are offering to settle a PPI claim in the name I use for the NHS. It is not a name on my credit cards and they probably also know that I have no credit cards in that name, despite claiming to want to represent me in claiming PPI.

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Guest

Josephine, you would be surprised at the amount of UK organisations that have access to NHS files and that includes the US as well . All this talk of secure+secrecy is for public consumption to reassure them. Yes Stanton Fisher are a medical claims company ,no worse nor better than any other at least they are UK based . I am afraid the more talk is made of how “secure ” our data is the more insecure it is , the new digital world is “heaven ” to a lot of companies , easy to transfer computer to computer.

Guest
dieseltaylor says:
17 June 2016

That is shocking Josephine. I suggest you follow this up. My guess is that the ICO should be informed of this and please let us know. NHS records being used my indicate someone is making a little business out of their gebnuine job.

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Guest

I now notice the action fraud website has changed from the last time I was there . Different layout and questionnaire and a checker to see if you are human . I am glad to see no visible trackers but its all down to Amazon cloud servers isnt it ? and they are not 100 % safe .

Profile photo of Commander Chris Greany
Guest

Hello, we are improving the Action Fraud Service and I can confirm it is NOT on an Amazon Cloud Server FYI
best wishes
Chris

Profile photo of duncan lucas
Guest

Thanks for that Commander Chris , it does make all the difference to me and the general public to know that you know of these things . It boosts confidence.

Guest
Richard Watson says:
17 June 2016

I was contacted by Facebook and invited to be “friends” with a very old close friend I had shared a flat with.
This was in fact NOT my old friend but someone who had somehow hacked into his account and had feigned his identity!
After the initial exchange of pleasantries the conversation turned to what the hacker intended to do with his winnings of $80000. I enquired further about this and was encouraged to check out “Agent Marry Zollinger Sandra from the Facebook International Monetary Program” who “helps and supports Widowed, Old, Young, Retired, Disable, and citizen workers with compensation” to see if I was also a lucky winner on the list.
It took me a little while for me to realise this was a scam but after being encouraged to clink on a link and fill in a form (presumably with my bank details) I stopped short, thank goodness.
It struck me how easy it is to be drawn in and I would like to warn others of this scam.
(I have a printout of the exchange of messages which gives more detail than I’ve provided above.)

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Guest

Last week I received an email purporting to be from TalkTalk. The heading was “Important safety information – stay safe from scams”. It looked genuine but I had suspicions on two counts. Firstly it was addressed to “Dear Customer” and secondly because at the end was the statement “Is this email genuine? Click here for help and advice on how to stay safe online.” Clearly, the last thing any sensible person is going to do if they have doubts about an email is to click on any link in it!

I contacted TalkTalk via their online chat function. The advisor told me my suspicion was correct and stated that “TalkTalk is not sending any email that will ask you to click on any link”. The email also asks that suspicious calls are reported to them and they have advisors who will investigate calls and block numbers where appropriate. Unhelpfully, the email does not state how to report these calls . It suggests visiting “talktalk.co.uk/scamcalls” for more information but I cannot find any info there on how to report suspicions. When I asked the advisor if there was an online link for reporting issues he confirmed there was not.

The advisor asked me to forward the email and heading data to the techies at phishing@talktalkplc.com. I did that and they have responded to say that the email is, in fact, a genuine TalkTalk email! So Talk Talk, a major company who have been targeted for online fraud send out an email on online security, which their own advisors are apparently not aware of, which asks customers to report suspicions even though they have no defined reporting process, and worst of all, which invites customers to take an action well known to be one of the most basic no-nos of online security. If this is the level of competence of one of the country’s largest communications companies then is it any wonder that the scammers are thriving!

Guest
J Finlayson says:
28 July 2016

I have had a deduction of £15.00 made from my bank account March 2016, I am very cross with myself for not spotting this deduction made by COMPLETESAFE.CO.UK. i do not recollect joining this save scheme and my bank seems to think I became entangled in this via a legitimate online purchase.
I have not as yet been able tocontact COMPLETESAVE.CO.UK by telephone.
Logging on to Completesave scam it seems there are quite a number of people in the same situation.

Guest
Martin says:
29 August 2016

I am aware that scammers can give their game away by making spelling mistakes. I have recently received an email apparently from Which? Campaigns, and immediately recognized a possible scam from their spelling mistakes . I quote ” Which emails are real and which ones to dodgy, by taking our quiz now”.
Then later , and I quote ” Can you help us by forwarding the below email to a family member….”
If this isn’t a scam, could Which Campaigns please check their messages , before writing to members?

Guest
Mark Jeffery says:
23 September 2016

A dear lady friend of ours was conned out of £90 last month on her phone by a company sending her news of gifts and prizes as texts that she could not prevent. I have now texted STOP on her phone. I hope it has worked.

Guest
Alan Carleton says:
30 November 2016

This morning I received a phone call from this number 0121 445 5001 the caller said he was from BT and wanted to offer me a better deal. The way he spoke made me suspicious of his identity so I hung up. I have checked with BT and they confirm it is not a number they use. My message is if you get called from this number hang up and report the call to abuse@BT.com