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Got a wind farm nearby? Could you save on your energy bills?

Paper windmills made out of currency in note form

Would you back local wind farms if they gave you discount on your energy bills? Good Energy’s founder Juliet Davenport explains why the company is trying to ensure that local customers share in their success.

We recently announced that we’d be launching the UK’s first dedicated local electricity tariff early next year. Households situated close to our Delabole wind farm in Cornwall are set to save more than £100 a year with 20% off our standard electricity tariff. And if the wind turbines perform better than expected, then there will be an additional discount of up to £50.

The scheme will be available to around 300 existing and new customers who live within two kilometres of the wind farm. We also plan to develop a range of new renewable energy sites over the next four years, and we will offer this tariff to residents near to any wind farm we build over a 4MW in size.

Rewards for local communities

For us, the rationale for launching a local tariff is quite simple – we think it’s only right that those communities playing a role in supporting the kind of projects that can help deliver better energy security and lower our carbon emissions should be recognised for doing so.

I think that wind power has a huge role to play in meeting the UK’s future energy needs, and it’s only right that local communities should be recognised for their contribution to tackling climate change and reducing the UK’s reliance on expensive imported fossil fuels.

The question is, would you be happy for a new wind farm to be built near you if you could directly draw from its energy and enjoy a discount on your bills?

Which? Conversation provides guest spots to external contributors. This is from Juliet Davenport, Good Energy’s CEO and founder. All opinions expressed here are Juliet’s own, not necessarily those of Which?.

Comments
Guest

It’s quite farcical how often we have to hear some bore tell us all about base load, or about how nuclear is the answer to all of our problems.

Wind on its own is not a solution, but it’s certainly part of the solution – whether it’s really more effective to be building these on land rather than at sea is another matter, as is how the Government chooses to provide incentives.

Guest
FINSBURYPARKER says:
20 December 2012

Its not even ‘Part’ of the solution!

Yes, we do need reliable non polluting energy sources, its just that wind turbines aren’t it, or even part of it!

It will take time for the penny to drop, but, it will eventually!

Guest
Guest
Electricsaver1200 says:
5 March 2014

Having wind turbines on my back yard is truly amazing, I can save more on my bills and I can always gaze at the beauty of the turbine almost everyday… Its clean, green and I save more..

Guest

Anyone know if windfarms were working during the heavy winds we had in Dec/Jan or were they all switched off?

Guest
FINSBURYPARKER says:
5 March 2014

If the wind speed is above a certain level, (and they would have been during the recent storms) the blades automatically ‘Feather’, the same as they do on prop driven air planes when an engine fails, to reduce drag, therefore, there would have been no energy production.

Check out the links below for alternative energy!

Way to go?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3rL08J7fDA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flibe_Energy

Guest

Sorry, I should have emphasised the tongue in cheek aspect of my question.

Guest
FINSBURYPARKER says:
5 March 2014

I knew it was a ‘Tongue In Cheek’ post Will, I just used the opportunity to post the links I did for the mentally challenged on here Will!

Guest
malcolm r says: