/ Home & Energy

Energy suppliers respond to our campaign – what do you think?

Energy deadline

31 January marked the deadline for energy suppliers to submit their plans to wake up their customers who are sat on standard variable tariffs. So what’s the score then?

Some of you will recall that after a full two-year long investigation by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), last summer the investigation finally concluded.

And it confirmed what we already knew – this market just simply isn’t working for consumers and it’s time for energy companies to accept they need to change.

Disengaged customers

The crux of problem is that, largely we, as consumers, just aren’t engaged with what’s going on with our energy.

And there could be a number of reasons why this is – such as, not knowing how to engage, difficulty understanding energy tariffs or bills, or just simply, a lack of trust in energy companies.

But, there’s a bigger problem here – and one that we’ve been campaigning on – that those who don’t engage are often the ones penalised for it. This comes in the form of paying out for standard variable tariffs or SVTs.

These tariffs are usually the most expensive tariffs on the market. Our research found that the gap between a SVT price paid with the Big Six is, on average, £111 more than their cheapest tariffs and over 58% of the Big Six’s energy customers are on these tariffs.

Well today, Which? was in Parliament giving evidence to the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy parliamentary select committee, on what progress we’ve seen since the regulators published their energy market findings last summer.

And we certainly didn’t pull any punches…

Six months after the CMA’s inquiry concluded and energy prices topped the list of biggest consumer worries. What’s more, trust in the sector has continued to dwindle, and the Big Six energy suppliers also found themselves lumped into the bottom half of our annual energy customer satisfaction survey.

From our view, while we’ve seen Ofgem take on the challenge set, and start trialling and testing ways to improve the current situation with our energy, the same cannot be said of the industry.

Energy sector response

It seems that energy suppliers are dragging their feet and waiting to be told what to do by the government or the regulators, bringing into question their commitment to really making this a proper functioning, competitive market that works for its customers.

And that’s exactly why we’ve been calling on energy suppliers to submit plans that show how they are going to help their most disengaged customers, those on SVTs, get engaged and moving onto better deals.

The deadline we set for that challenge is today. We’ve allowed almost three months for energy suppliers to submit their plans – you can see who has responded to our calls on our energy campaign website.

So, after nearly three years of looking at the problems with our energy, we now want the energy sector to start being part of the solution. Their customers have been waiting far too long already.

Update 14 Feb 2017: Suppliers respond

Our latest analysis of Ofgem data reveals that two thirds of energy customers are still stuck on the most expensive deals. As part of our Fair Energy Prices campaign, we challenged energy suppliers to publish plans on how they’d get these customers engaged and switching.

We had 19 responses from energy suppliers and, of those, 14 set out plans to engage their customers, including trialling simpler bills and new ways to make people to switch. Here’s Which? Campaigns Manager Neena Bhati talking about these plans:

Energy prices remain a top worry for consumers, and with the recent price hikes it’s vital that all companies do more to engage with their customers and make it easier to switch to better deals.

We’ve passed all the plans to the government and Ofgem and have called on them to report on progress by the end of April. We’ll also be pressing suppliers to deliver on their plans, and to regularly set out what difference this is making to their customers.

Do you think the energy industry is doing enough for customers? Do you feel the industry works for you?

Comments
Guest
S E Rough says:
17 February 2017

I have been a First Utility customer since their beginning. I have had many problems with them. As pensioners on Pension Credit we are entitled to the Warm Home Discount from the DWP but it has become increasingly difficult to get it credited to our account. They say it will be done by May. As they have me on a fixed tariff until April I feel I am stuck with them. It will cost me £60 to change supplier as I have duel fuel. Also I have no guarantee that the discount will still be applied. I have emailed and rung them but get no sense out of the person I talk to. Despite having health issues I cannot register on their Priority register. The tariff I am on was just done with no agreement from myself. I was originally on a tariff ending in February. I’m not sure what else I can do. I would like to change but not sure it I can afford to.

Guest
brian says:
18 February 2017

I switched out of First Utility ‘cos of the bad service I was getting. What they say and what they do is far different. You should get the Warm Home discount by the end of Feb never mind May . Email them say you will take it to the Energy Ombudsman

Guest
Joy Stanley says:
19 February 2017

I suggest you do your sums when you have found a supplier offering you a better deal. You could find you may still make a saving even after paying the £60 to your old supplier

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Guest

S E Rough do get out of First Utility as soon as possible. They are a total disgrace. If a customer is happy with them they are very probably one of a fortunate few. First Utility sent us legally threatening emails trying to make out that we were to blame for their constant muddles. After many months the Ombudsman ordered First Utility to compensate us £130. It took about 130 hours of my personal time to obtain this. What a joke-it should have been £1300. This matter appeared in Which? in August 2014-but the article was too brief to give the full picture. To change energy supplier use the free service to the public offered by Which? -you don’t have to be a member to use it. Hope this helps.

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Guest

I have never heard of First utility

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Guest

Dan- : https://www.first utility.com I am not vouching for them only providing an answer to your question.

Guest
Andrew Rugman says:
17 February 2017

Been a First Utility Customer From The Start And Very Happy

Guest
Barrie Pope says:
17 February 2017

I’m with British Gas dual fuel, Having read the response to the questions asked by Which, I feel the answers they supplied are dilatory vague and non committal , Like all the Big 6. Things will not change while global corporate money and Government complicity continues

Guest
I. Gibson says:
17 February 2017

I switched to First Utility from one of the ‘big six’ last year and have a much better price . So far, so good.

Guest
George Gilroy says:
17 February 2017

Have been with OVO for a number of years for home energy, prices are reasonable but their customer services are a bit odd, they answer the phone, sort out queries effectively and efficiently and keep me up to date with everything that is going on with my account. Had a small business account with them till a couple of years age when I retired, they were very impressive at that as well. I think the striking feeling I get from OVO is that I feel like a valued customer not a revenue source.

Guest
Klomps says:
18 February 2017

Yes Im with ovo in my third year now Very good company.. Cant reduce monthly payment but can withdraw lump sum from your acc in a couple of days. Have got to keep at least one payment in credit fair enough

Guest
ron duff says:
17 February 2017

i am with ovo energy a very good energy company which doesnt rip customers off like the big six companys

Guest
Rhiannone Taylor says:
17 February 2017

Mine isn’t even listed! Extra energy!

Guest

I’m not surprised! However it’s quite concerning when my energy supplier isn’t even listed! Extra Energy.?..

Guest
Louis Nagy says:
17 February 2017

We had Solar panels installed 14 months ago. Yesterday I learnt an interesting anomaly: All the household appliances are made for the European 220 volts and the European energy suppliers have a regulated voltage with about 4 – 6 volts tolerance on either side of 220V. In Gb the incoming voltage to households is 240 volts and is not regulated and fluctuates between 225 and 253. That volt surge is the reason why kitchen appliances tend to burn, or conk out in 4 – 5 years – whereas and in the EU does not happen. The closer regulated voltage in European countries will not adversely affects those machines, such as washing machines, tumble dryers, dish washers,and all household electrical appliances. What is worse, that the British energy suppliers do not intend to regulate the voltage with a more confined tolerance and therefore it affects the incoming solar energy supplies by cutting out the produced incoming solar energy. The cut-outs could even be as long as 15 minutes. Has anyone with solar, or wind-turbine energy been aware of this?
It would be interesting to know more about this and above all the government should compel the energy suppliers to regulate the voltage within close tolerance.
Regards, Louis

Guest
John MacLeod says:
17 February 2017

I think you’re confusing a couple of things here. When the nominal voltage in the UK was reduced, the tolerance specification was also altered — less on the low side than on the high side.
Voltage surge is something quite different from supply voltage variation from nominal.
If your voltage is beyond the permissible tolerance from nominal, then you might find that old fashioned tungsten light bulbls, or halogen bulbs, might have slightly shorter life, but in general terms longevity of appliances isn’t seriously affected at the high end of the specified voltage tolerance.
What IS a problem is when you get rapid voltage fluctuations, resulting in a series of rapd switches from 0v to 230 volts and back again in rapid repetition. That’s the sort of thing that happens when an auto-reclose breaker on the DNO’s supply line chatters and it can rapidly destroy electronic equipment.
With regard to your solar panel system, it seems to me that it may not have been designed to operate within the tolerances specified for UK DNOs. There should be no problem at the lower voltage end of the mains supply tolerance — if it’s misinterpreting a 250 volt supply figure as a signal to cut off the solar panel system,. then it’s a design fault in the solar panel controller, not a fault in the mains supply.

Guest
Sue McDonald says:
17 February 2017

EDF did recommend a different tariff that would save me money on my last statement. I called them, discussed it thoroughly, checked elsewhere and agreed. Saved £60+ per annum.

Credit where it’s due

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Guest

You are incorrect about the tight European voltage tolerance (unless you can show evidence to the contrary). Voltage “harmonisation” was required but because of the huge investment in generation plant, presumably, neither would change the nominal voltage. So the allowable voltage tolerances (that set statutory upper and lower limits) were changed, with the harmonised voltage being 230V. http://www.schneider-electric.co.uk/en/faqs/FA144717/

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Guest

While not disagreeing with John M above malcolm nor with your URL what is happening nowadays is most electrical equipment made for public use is SMPS which will work off a very wide range of mains input supply voltage so will be little effected by variations in EU/UK voltages which John M , quite rightly says can rise to 254 V AC RMS . In the old days of valve radio etc mains input transformers were the norm which had originally tapping,s up to 250 V AC RMS but changed to 240 V AC RMS . Some of my test equipment is very sensitive to voltage fluctuations and I onlyb use mains transformers due to waveform distortion / harmonic distortion / ripple / noise from SMPS,s even my top[ end hi-fi is all mains transformer input . The problem with modern household equipment is that manufacturers to save money standardise the working voltage at 230 V AC RMS so that it will operate both in the EU and UK . the problem is , having spent decades measuring mains voltages , it depends where you live as to what your WORKING voltage is and I have lived in places where its 250 V AC RMS , this can put a strain on lower standard voltage working equipment especially cheap stuff.

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Guest

That’s quite right, duncan. The statutory voltage bands was what I was referring to. The EU voltage “harmonisation” was a fudge to encompass the nominal continental 220v and the UK 240v, to which both were committed with their capital equipment. The voltage you get at your premises will partly depend upon your distance from the substation and the load at the time, so 254v is possible in the UK. Equipment is required to meet the extremes to comply with standards. This is easier with much decent equipment including electronics (commercial lighting ballasts as one example) where the circuits allow for the range but, as you say, cheap stuff can suffer shorter life (as will some resistive devices like light filament light bulbs) but it should not be unsafe. Generally it is a fudge that has worked so electrical equipment can be sold Europe-wide.

Guest
Eric Colley says:
17 February 2017

I went with Extra Energy after being advised to join them by a comparison website. The biggest recent mistake I can remember making. Having been with SSE for 2 years at a yearly cost of £270/285, I spent £575 with Extra Energy, the ‘Extra’ standing for cost I am convinced. Having been threatened with Dept Collection and a bad credit rating agencies by being slightly late with my last payment because I queried the final year 12th payment with them as not being fair with a £25 surcharge included, which I then paid, less a reduction their employee gave me of £10, but was chased for the £10, again with the same threats, several times including a dept chasing Company. Having not heard from them recently either for payment or not payment I assume they are too busy chasing other customers or writing that reply to ‘Which’ saying how good there customer relations are?

Guest
Narik says:
17 February 2017

Really sympathise Eric.
I only use the Which comparison site, but even then I’m not convinced the savings mentioned really reflective or even materialise. I’m weary of moving to small companies.

I went to Co-Op from a bigger company and then Co-Op had really big problems with billing.

Guest
Narik says:
17 February 2017

Co-Op may not have responded to Which but it responded to me:

Thank-you for your email about the Which? campaign to help people switch.

As a co-operative, we’re different from other energy companies. We’re the largest member-owned energy supplier, which means our customers can have a say in how we’re run and receive a share of our profits. We work hard to be completely clear and transparent, focusing on our members, customers and long-term sustainability.

Our standard variable tariff – Co-op Green Pioneer – is different to many others in the market. It guarantees 100% renewable electricity and a proportion of the profits from the tariff are donated to fund renewable energy projects including wind, solar-PV and hydroelectric technologies.

We make it as easy as possible to switch. We offer a range of straightforward and fair tariffs, and provide clear advice and information to help every customer select the best value deal for them.

We write to all of our customers in the months leading up to the expiry of their fixed price contract to make them aware of our best available fixed-rate tariffs. We also issue quarterly bills, either by post or on our online portal. Each bill includes a section that clearly highlights if there is a better deal to switch to.

Finally, through publishing energy saving tips and advice in customer newsletters and on our website, we are helping to reduce customers’ bills no matter which tariff they are on.

We’re always reviewing our service to customers, and will continue to test and trial different ways of communicating to help you find the tariff that is right for you.

Thank you again for getting in touch.
Andy Springall
Head of Customer Experience

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Guest

At the expense of being condemned Narik and as a satisfied Co-op Power customer not only do I back up what you have posted -everything you have posted is truthful as that is why I joined CP being a Co-op member from an early age along with my mother . CP treated me well unlike SP/BG and both my fuels are with it. Most companies put out flashy literature , flashy words but their down to earth approach won it for me along with being treated like a human being in contrast to the two above and I got a good deal .

Guest
Ivan Martrin says:
17 February 2017

I have received a letter from NPower Informing me that the electric variable I’m on will increase on 16 March next 2017 from 16.632 to 17.430 Kwh. Previously there was no daily unit charge but on the 16 march next there will be a 15.824 pence per day charge. My present Feelgood April 218 gas would be unchanged

However, I have opted for a new electric tariff : Online Price Fix to March 2018: 12.621pence Kwh: Standing daily charge of 22p. I have not changed my gas and at Feelgood April2018.as alternatives are dearer.

I pay by monthly direct debit as I’ve always done. I am a fairly low cost user but comparing the last Quarter usage with my new prices I will be saving approx. £18 a qtr. this is based on the last Autumn quarter which is followed of course is by a more expensive qtr So I’m very pleased with my new arrangement. It’s not all doom and gloom if we change to best tariffs and methods of payment.

Guest
Michael Simms says:
18 February 2017

i am an OAP my supplier is EDF energy.i know the tariff I am on is too high but nothing has been done or offered

Guest
frederick edwards says:
18 February 2017

Contact them on the phone and have a chat to them about this. They are, I’ve found over the years I’ve been with them, very agreeable to discuss and come to an agreement with them.

Guest
Mr C McCormack says:
18 February 2017

It’s all very well pushing the energy companies to cut their profits, but why aren’t the government ministers doing their utmost to help their voters, repeat voters! By forcing the issue?.

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Guest

What is an acceptable profit? Commercial companies raise the capital for their businesses from their shareholders. who risk their money (share price) in exchange for a return in the form of a dividend. If they receive no return, or an inadequate return, they will sell their shares and invest in other businesses. These shareholders may be individuals, but also institutional investors that use the returns to pay our pensions.

In 2015 the average margin before interest and tax for the major energy suppliers was 4.04%. That does not seem unreasonable.

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Guest

The salaries collected by the CEOs of energy companies may be in the second division compared with some of those in the commercial world but they are still a lot more than we pay our Prime Minister and others involved in running the country: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2011/dec/06/bonuses-executive-pay-energy-firms

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Guest

So is the CEO’s of Which? It is surprising (or is it?) how many of those involved in running our country end up very wealthy indeed );Tony Blair, Peter Mandelson, for example, and how many quite well paid public servants move into private sector jobs coincidentally rather related to their previous jobs. Footballers, singers, also can do quite well. It is a hard and unfair world 🙂

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Guest

On the basis that some people cannot afford to heat their homes properly, don’t you think it would be useful to address the problem?

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Guest

While personal taxation and VAT on personal spending are the chief redistribution mechanisms, there is no doubt that some top salaries are obscene, including in some publicly-funded organisations like the BBC. Unfortunately this corporate remuneration has an incestuous ratchet effect based on a self-fulfilling [but not intrinsically true] proposition that you have to pay the most to get the best. Although energy bosses are probably not the fattest cats on the street, delivering energy is not the most challenging of occupations either.

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Guest

Addressing CEOs’ salaries will not have any significant effect on energy bills, no more than addressing the Which? CEO’s salary will have any effect on subscriptions, or Tesco boss’s £4.6M will reduce your shopping bill – a bill that is substantially higher than your energy bill and no doubt which some are also struggling to pay.

James Dyson is reputed to be worth £5 billion – should he reduce the price of his vacuum cleaners? It is about perceived fairness, not practical outcomes.

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Guest

It’s not just the CEOs that are overpaid, Malcolm, so maybe applying some common sense could make a difference, or don’t we bother about ethics?

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Guest

“On the basis that some people cannot afford to heat their homes properly, don’t you think it would be useful to address the problem?”

I agree comrade, but think a comprehensive solution needs to address all the root causes and not just retail energy prices.

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Guest

No doubt these same people have difficulty with food bills, with their rent – all substantially more than energy, and many will struggle with transport. We will not see energy prices substantially reduce – they are determined by wholesale prices, distribution costs, government levies and so on. But most people have the option of moving off variable tariffs onto cheaper fixed price ones at the moment. So there is a part solution. That needs working on.

Guest
Manon says:
18 February 2017

EDF. No news. Still sending four meter readers on four different occasions for the four flats plus on for the common staircase, all meters being in the same box on the ground floor and all of which are with EDF. Do they disguise the cost of their inefficiency by labelling it “increase in the cost of producing electricity”?

Guest

I’m surprised Robin Hood Energy haven’t replied yet – do you have a standardised template I can send them as a consumer? Thanks.

Guest
Ann Johnson says:
18 February 2017

I am surprised that Coop Energy has not replied, on the whole have been pleased with the service from them and their charges are acceptable

Guest
Mike Kitson says:
18 February 2017

I am surprised Green Star Energy have not responded. I was impressed with them when we moved from Coop Energy.

Guest
cecilia reilly says:
18 February 2017

We have stayed with Eon but our new tariff is £17 a month more than we were paying before and that was the cheapest. We have moved several time but do not feel it is always worthwhile . It is still very difficult to differentiate between the charges of all the different suppliers

Guest
Philip S Humphry says:
18 February 2017

I’m surprised that Ebico haven’t responded as i would and do recomend them to people that i know.

Guest
Richard Turner says:
18 February 2017

I would be very interested to how First Utility responded as I have not received any communication from them

Guest
Mozer says:
18 February 2017

I moved from M&S to Green Star Energy in Jan 2017 Neither responded can a reason be requested by Which

Guest

I see little point in Which? wasting time in asking energy companies what they intend to do. A significant proportion refuse to answer and the remainder just engage in the usual self-justificatory PR carp (as evidenced by the statements they have provided). Which? should continue to investigate and report on what these overblown and out-of-control money-making machines actually DO rather than what they SAY.

Guest

Pointless campaign by WHICH. Energy companies are there to make as much profit as they can and have us over a barrel. OFGEM is a waste of space and money. Customers want only one tariff and that is the cheapest. Energy supplies should be taken back into public ownership and run as not for profit, as should water.

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Guest

It’s not true to say that “customers only want one tariff” Lyn. Some want a standing charge and some don’t. Some want a lower night rate and a higher day rate. Some want a prepayment meter. Some want a long contract and a fixed price, but others want more flexibility and a variable rate that goes up and down with wholesale prices.

The supply of energy is the easy bit and, so long as the regulatory framework is strong, excess profits should not be an issue [and, as Malcolm has shown, they are not]. I don’t think nationalisation could add much value to the supply operation and nationalising it would put the government at the mercy of the energy producers. Nationalisation worked in the past because all electricity and gas was produced from home-produced coal, the production and allocation of which was easy to control. Now that most of the resources for energy production are imported [apart from some renewables] it all depends on procurement capability, an area in which the government has a dubious record. Of course, it could set up HM Energy Procurement Board [the Joule in the Crown] stuffed with professionals recruited from the state-sequestered energy companies but at a stroke it would lose the competitive edge and end up paying premium prices for every last bit and put taxpayers’ money at risk when negotiating long-term contracts.

Guest
Chris says:
19 February 2017

I can understand why WHICH has launched this campaign however, i fail to see the good it will do. Energy companies will continue to rip us off in any way they deem fit as they know we need gas and electricity to survive. Everyday i drive past more properties that are having solar panels or wind turbines fitted to their houses to lower the amount of energy needed from suppliers. I am considering doing the same, by this i mean generating my own power (or as much as i can) and only using energy suppliers when i’m using more than i can generate. I’m sure you all will agree, any money saved will be better off in your pocket than theirs (energy companies)

Guest
Rodney Hedges says:
19 February 2017

Wake up Which. Energy companies do not give tuppence for what you say or try to do.

They will always rip us off……this government needs to take control of this overcharging.

Guest

I am with OVO, since two years, and am very satisfied with them.

In your review, did you include any of the ‘crowd-funded’ groups (MSE? etc)
which are playing the numbers card?

Guest
Mark Humphries says:
19 February 2017

The answer from EDF:
“We believe that the CMA remedies will provide a cross-industry approach, and that we need to make them a success. We are already playing our part, supporting Ofgem in their trials for the customer database, and instead of waiting for the prepayment cap to come in later this year, we decreased prepayment gas prices from 6 January so that customers benefit during the coldest months when gas consumption is at its highest. We commend the focus you are putting on customer engagement. We will continue to work hard to help our loyal customers get the most from their energy, as set out in December when we announced our gas decrease and froze our electricity prices until March 1st.”
Yes they reduced gas prices and Yes they froze the electric price till March 1st and Yes they then spat their dummy threw all the toys out of the pram and as from April 1st we will hike up the electric price to offset what we loose in the gas decrease so all in all “screw you loyal EDF customer we will take you for all that we can”.
Is it now time for some one to step in and say enough is enough and stop these companies once and for all people no longer have the money and these companies know this but still want more, either bring these companies all in line and cap prices or bring it back to government control.

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Guest

Have you looked at switching from EDF? There are currently around 47 active suppliers – 39 dual fuel, 6 gas only, 2 electricity only. Worth a look on Which?Switch to see if you can get a better deal and set it in progress.

Guest
Debbie says:
19 February 2017

I am really horrified! I used to like EDF and they have helped me somewhat over the past 4 years I’ve been with them. Yet they will not address the elephant in the room – ie: their overcharging! Because of this I’ve got a debt with them and they’re REFUSING to let me change to a company who contacted me and I’ve been looking into of late called Octopus! Unlike the big six they own about 40 per cent of the national grid and can pass this onto the consumer with much lower fuel costs. (Having my dreaded electricity bills). Ofcourse I would make an arrangement to keep paying EDF back but I would start saving in real time if I were given the opportunity to join Octopus. They are guilty of keeping people trapped in a fuel poverty of their own making! It’s so unfair.

Profile photo of malcolm r
Guest

Material interests in shares
As at 31 March 2016, National Grid had been notified of the following
holdings in voting rights of 3% or more in the issued share capital of
the Company:
Number of ordinary shares…………………………………… % of voting rights
Black Rock, Inc. 220,432,122………………………………………………………..5.88
Competrol International
Investments Limited 149,414,285……………………………………………..3.98
The Capital Group
Companies, Inc. 145,094,617 ………………………………………………………3.88

Perhaps this is what you meant about Octopus?:
“Octopus is the UK’s largest investor in solar farms
In fact, the farms we’ve funded generate 40% of all the UK’s large scale solar – enough to power over a quarter of a million homes (when the sun shines!)”

Someone also needs to generate electricity when the sun doesn’t shine.

Guest
J.Bright says:
19 February 2017

Changed my supplier from OVO after 12 months of repeated appointments and cancellations with dozens of e-mails re the fitting of Smart Meters then being told in September 2015 there was nothing they could do. Changed to First Utility and within two weeks Smart Meter fitted and have been very helpful to me from first speaking to them, completely different from OVO poor company although voted number one supplier in Which? magazine

Guest
Robert Griffiths says:
19 February 2017

Re-Nationalise Power.

Guest
James Chambers says:
19 February 2017

I have been with First Utility for several years now and overall they have very cometative tariffs however….they still like to try it on. They offered me a “special deal” where i can fix for 4 years but the rate is almost DOUBLE what i am paying now. It is an insult to my intelligence and i resent these gimmicks.

Guest
Ray Fowles says:
Today 09:02

I have switched from BGas to IRESA as they gave me little alternative, the “new deals” are literally closely aligned with the standard offering., which is around a third higher than my current deal.

Guest
DWSampson says:
Today 10:22

@Robert Griffiths – Agreed, but the problem there is we run the risk of being held to ransom by the unions, i.e. Southern Rail, that dispute has been rumbling on for months now.

So which way does society want things: A) renationalise utilities, transport et al and be held to ransom by the unions or B) leave things as they are and be held to ransom by shareholders / stakeholders.

Either way the consumer / customer looses, so we we need to ask ask ourselves what are we do about this??

Guest
william paige says:
Today 11:54

I received notification of Npower’s headline increase in electricity prices by 15 % earlier this month, with it came an estimate of my personal annual cost change (from £226 to £291) which is in fact not far short of a 30% increase (28.55% to be exact), this results mainly from an extraordinary increase in the daily standing charge from 11.508p to 27.332p. The result is that the standing charge now amounts to one third of my estimated total bill. This means that my overall cost per unit is far higher thanthe average user. In an age when nearly everyone recognises that we should use as little energy as possible is it right that low users are penalised in this way, surely we should be rewarded for our economy? can anyone suggest a provider which has a much lower standing charge?