/ Home & Energy

When will the government face its responsibilities on rip-off energy prices?

British Gas price hike

The price households pay for their gas and electric is proving to be a problem that won’t go away for the government, no matter how much tough talking they do on the subject.

Our latest data shows increased levels of concern for ever-growing prices. More than half of all people surveyed (56%) thought energy prices should be a key priority for the government – up by 5 percentage points from April.

The highest increase was in the 25 to 34-year-old age group, with the figure increasing by 14 percentage points (from 33% in April to 47% in September). Consumers aged 45 to 54 see energy prices as the biggest issue, with 63% saying the government should make it a key priority, up from 54% before the election.

With these shifts in priorities, it’s worth pausing to consider how we got here. The Competition Markets Authority (CMA) published its final report into the energy market in June 2016, finding that consumers had been ripped-off to the tune of £1.4bn a year due to high prices between 2012 and 2015.

Prices on the rise

Since then, prices have continued to go up. In fact, over the last 10 years bills have risen by more than 40% for gas and 35% for electricity. That’s a considerable chunk of a household budget for a product that, despite innovations in green energy, has more or less remained the same. But, perhaps more pointedly, popular anger reflects the less than satisfactory attempts by Ministers to address this consumer issue.

People are sick of the endless squabble about energy prices and want action now. Ministers say they are prepared to act. The government urgently needs to set out how it will make this broken market work for consumers.

While we’re waiting, the best thing you can do is to keep a close eye on your energy deal and make sure you switch to a good value deal.What do you think the solution is to the broken energy market? How many of you switched since the British Gas price increase was announced in August?

What do you think the solution is to the broken energy market? How many of you switched since the British Gas price increase was announced in August?

Comments
Guest
bishbut says:
16 September 2017

Some people expect to do EVERYTHING for them ! Thy should learn to do some things for themselves the government cannot do everything that some people expect or demand they do Anything the government does is a very slow process Some want things done immediately at once if not sooner or even before that I agree about energy they can do something but many things are your personal responsibility to do others can only partly help

Guest

Yes< you can do it personally but that still does not stop the greed of the energy companys', there is no question the market has to be controlled as a priority

Guest

I’ve just switched from npower to Scottish Power .

Switching was easy because ScottishPower are members of the Energy Switch Guarantee scheme, so they did all the work for me, including the work of getting npower to play their part in the move .

Hence I do not agree that the energy market is broken.

Guest

I think when people are referring to a broken energy market its because of the greed that prevails in it.

Guest

I’m afraid that, so long as we tend to vote Conservative and tend to want to live in a non-EU capitalist country, we are going to have to accept that ambition and to a certain extent, also greed, are going to be driving factors in our privatised industries.

That having been said, I still do not accept that the existence of greed proves that the market is broken.

Guest

With you on the first paragraph Derek you are just being realistic . The second paragraph depends on how people view the word “broken ” , broken can be fixed in many cases so , in this case it can br fixed but wont be precisely because of your first paragraph.

Guest
bishbut says:
17 September 2017

One terrible supplier to another !

Guest

As I see it, this Convo debate is based on sensationalist, rabble rousing journalism by W?C.

In summary, the header article claims that, prices are “high” and rising – so the market must be broken.

I think that is very poor logic and supported by little or no evidence.

For example, external factors (e.g. falling £ post-Brexit vote) and the costs of building new plant (solar plus on and off-shore wind) to replace still serviceable (but CO2 emission embargoed) coal fired stations may also affect pricing.

Energy prices should reflect generation, transmission and retail costs plus reasonable profits. If unreasonable profits are being taken anywhere, I doubt that it is in the retail sector, where we have about 40 companies competing for our custom – and thus offering cheap (loss leading?) fixed-term tariffs to attract new customers.

An inconvenient truth is that many households still waste a lot a energy, simply via poor standards of construction and insulation or by poor management practices (e.g. heating on but windows open for ventilation, lights and appliances needless left on).

Guest
Peter J. says:
16 September 2017

The whole of the energy supply to this nation is an absolute rip off. What the successive governments have done is remove the generating source from the end user and replaced the direct billing with a costly paper exercise which isn’t benefiting any consumers. The person who thought this stupid situation up must have had an absolute nightmare; that is in fact what has been the result. The mad Thatcher led race to privatisation has resulted in increased costs in every single source including water. Privatisation isn’t the answer. In the main it increases bureaucracy, political meddling, added profit taking, with the inevitable overall increase in costs. It is time to get back to basics across the whole spectrum of domestic and social costs to the nation and take dramatic and radical changes for the benefit of the nations people.

Guest

I have a smart meter with British gas which gives me free electric on Sundays until March 2018 so I won’t be switching until that ends , there are just the two of us and we use electric constantly on the free Sunday ,washing , tumble drying, bulk cooking and use electric heaters on that day . After that date we will look into cheaper options. Sunday has become a busy day for us lol

Guest

I have just switched from BG because I found their price increase unacceptable. They kept harping on about all these rewards they were offering but it is not rewards people want its affordable energy. One consolation at least we are safe in the knowledge the BG CEO has still got million pound wages, what a relief.

Guest
Helenlou24 says:
16 September 2017

I cannot really see any point in changing from one company to another, because they are all greedy toads and even when they tempt people to change with promises of better tariffs it is just to reel people in.

Guest

I totally agree with you that is why I never bother to switch

Guest
bishbut says:
17 September 2017

Have you ever tried the smaller suppliers Many are a lot better at looking after you A plug consider OVO

Guest

Surveying 2000 people and then extrapolating to the nation should be treated with some caution as the recent elections have shown.

I was wondering if asking people about heating costs and their concern is in anyway connected to the weather at the time you ask. And of course heating costs worries in April with the summer coming are very likely to be less than when seeing winter approaching.

The world as a whole has been faced with rising energy prices and as energy is a world market there are limits to what any Government can do – if it is a member of the World Trade Organisation. Perhaps it would help readers appreciate it is a global problem if the price rises in other countries were mentioned in this article.

What the British Government CAN do is stop adding green charges to bills and then getting the power companies to take the blame. Which? could explain about that.

Which? might also usefully do articles on window shutters, heat exchange pumps, and air exchange units that can recover up to 94% of the heat contained in the air that you exchange for fresh air into the house. For healthy air around four times an hour.

Over the last three years Members have suggested that Which? employ people equipped with thermal energy cameras to help subscribers see if their home are leaking expensive air by accident.

Many modern builds have been shown by heat mapping to be improperly insulated as much as older properties can be. A BBC article says that people shown heat maps are far more motivated to actually do something – Which? can copy the concept.

P.S.
“How many of you switched since the British Gas price increase was announced in August?
What do you think the solution is to the broken energy market? How many of you switched since the British Gas price increase was announced in August?”

Perhaps just asking once would be sufficient in three sentences at the end of the article.

Guest

A link to the 2016 report by the CMA
gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/531204/overview-modernising-the-energy-market.pdf

You may appreciate the short 12 page article outlining the proposals and wonder what has already been adopted.

The concept of nationalisation was not of course one of the areas under consideration but one cannot but feel the long-term planning for power generation in the UK should not be left to an assortment of companies with short-term shareholder considerations. Politicians have even shorter forward planning horizons – probably measured in months.

Guest

I have been with British Gas for more years than I can remember and I will not be switching, earlier in the year all the other big companies put there’s up and British Gas froze their prices till September so we all new that it would be eventually going up. I think all energy companies are greedy.

Guest

I wish Which? would focus on the problem that when fixed tariffs end, customers land up on more expensive standard variable tariffs. This exploits the vulnerable and also those who fail to take action, maybe because of serious illness or a whole variety of other reasons. Most of us can and should be able to avoid ending up on an expensive tariff, but let’s think about people other than ourselves.

Guest

The market is “broken” in a number of ways, not only the price (tariff) we pay, but also the standing charges. Just moved to my utility companies new tariff and the standing charges have almost doubled. Having to pay to cover other peoples solar panels + other green subsidies , or a pointless smart meter research and rollout (just wait til you get intra day pricing, you won’t like them then). And don’t get me started on the rules for switching, how can a company be allowed to quote a £350 saving on a fictitious scenario ( moving to a variable tariff ) when using my equally fictitious scenario of staying on the same tariff would see me paying £250 more.
I see the only way to fix this market is to take one company back into public ownership, but don’t let the government run it, set a more realistic price then the others will have to follow suit.

Guest

I support your proposal, William.

Guest
Samantha Evans says:
18 September 2017

I went to green power from Scottish Power and my payments have dropped by almost half. At my business I changed to Ecotricity and their standing charges were alot cheaper than any of the others. At home I have always been on pay as you go, so I don’t get big winter bills. I went with Robin Hood, which I believe is from Nottingham Council. Again alot cheaper last year than any others years of payment.
If people moved away from the Big rip off companies then they would have to lower their charges. Power is with the people, if only they acted upon it.

Guest

consumers had been ripped-off to the tune of £1.4bn a year . Is this because many consumers have not changed from standard variable tariffs – for a number of reasons, and the comparison being made is what they could have saved if they’d all gone on to the cheaper fixed price fixed term tariffs? If so, it may be ignoring the fact that if everyone migrated to fixed price tariffs, their prices would rise substantially, simply because they are currently being subsidised in my view. The energy companies could not possibly see £1.4 billion of turnover – and therefore profit – wiped out. Ofgen publish the profits of the major energy companies collectively at around £7-800 million a year. So if the “£1.4 billion rip off” were true, they’d end up losing £600 million a year……..

I have suggested abolishing fixed price fixed term subsidised tariffs and using the removal of the subsidy to reduce the cost of standard variable tariffs – which all should then use.

Guest
bishbut says:
21 September 2017

Not ripped off In a way people are being scammed by the energy companies maybe just to make them stay or pay more another subtle scam ?

Guest

Compare energy prices in the UK with those elsewhere in Europe, and factor in the Government-imposed charges that are not core to energy supply (around £100 I believe – plus vat). Which? need to explain this properly, and come up with serious proposals for how energy should be charged for. Simply beating the “rip off” drum is little more than generating populist headlines. They’d probably get the same response if they asked 2000 consumers about rent costs, house prices, food prices, commuting costs and taxes……………… Come on Which?, look at this issue in detail yourselves and perhaps come up with a “model energy supplier” and what their costs should be. Then you can elicit logical support, and not emotive responses.

Guest

Malcolm , you do know that Germany is the hub country for Gazprom and that Russia gives big concessions to Germany even with the US induced anti-Russian rhetoric .Germany then adds its own charges to the cost . There is a pipe line(or two) going to the South East coast of England connected to the main EU network . The UK doesn’t import much Russian gas due to the USA telling it not to. It gets its supplies from much dearer alternatives . Its so nice of the USA telling us to pay much more so that their policy of bringing Russia down can take effect under Donald,s Energy “security “policy which is — BUY US very high price gas . Germany has worked out its impossible to stop importing Russian gas so has partially fallen out with Donald but is delaying North Stream 2 on his orders . While this is happening pipelines through -now Russia,s enemy the Ukraine will likely be cut off making the economic situation in the EU pretty bad as the heavy US sanctions have a very bad effect on Germany + France etc . Donald couldn’t care less how much foreigners suffer so long as the US will make $Billions .I posted a good while ago the difference in gas prices paid by countries friendly to Russia and those being told to hate it. I can supply all the countries /amounts paid / the pipelines etc etc etc . Putin has now started Turkish Stream with Eregon,s blessing and intends to branch it to Europe but heavy US pressure s being put on countries like Bulgaria to block it . So what does that leave ? –impending future disaster and the UK paying increasing high prices due in the most part to US foreign policy which is entirely economic – under America First terms, a stated US policy approved by Congress. But never mind just ignore what I said and watch as prices increase and fuel poverty UK becomes a major problem .

Guest

According to Eurostat, for 2016, domestic gas prices in Germany were €0.044 / kWh without taxes and levies. In the UK they were €0.043. Industry € 0.033/0.026.

Guest
Dennis says:
26 September 2017

I switched from British Gas and to Bulb who is a green energy variable tariff supplier, they saved me over £200 a year and they also give £50 credit for joining, get a quote at bulb50.co.uk

Bulbs tariffs are currently.
Electricity Unit Rate: 13.001p per kWh
Electricity Standing Charge: 24.56p per day (£89.64 per year)
Gas Unit Rate: 2.628p per kWh
Gas Standing Charge: 24.56p per day (£89.64 per year)
Dual Fuel discount: £30/year

Either way moving away from the big 6 to any other supplier will probably save you hundreds, and while switching does not solve the overall problem it shows the big companies that loyalty only goes so far.

Guest

I have recently changed from a 12month online price fixed tariff to Aug 2017 with nPower to their latest 13 month online price fix tariff to Sept 2018. The new unit rates and standing charges seem competitive but then again there is no real competition going on. Comparing the old and new tariffs there has been: a 36% increase in the standing charge for electricity; a 25% increase in the unit rate for gas; a 15% increase in the standing charge for gas and 5% increase in the unit rate for electricity. I requested nPower justify these rather large price rises. nPower’s response was that it was too commercially sensitive to go into any sort of detail and the Energy Ombudsman can not deal with commercially sensitive decisions behind price increases. nPower stated that the Ombudsman Services were well aware of how they operate as a business and were fully aware of their processes regarding pricing. I therefore see little point in contacting the Energy Ombudsman over these price rises. I shall be monitoring energy tariffs over the next year and will switch supplier when it is cost effective to do so.

Guest

The government should not have reversed its rules to restrict companies to fewer tariffs, what we need is a simple price per unit with no extra price per day. When you go into a garage the price is “per litre”, the garage has to factor in its overheads, think of the outcry if they said its £1.20 per litre plus £1.00 for using the pump.

Guest

Your garage doesn’t deliver fuel to your premises. Energy companies have fixed costs to recover, however much or little energy you buy, from administering a credit account, paying for smart meters and other government “initiatives”, reading a meter, maintaining a connection. We have a choice of tariffs, some with standing charges, some without, and you can choose the one that suits you best. I believe we should be able to make a choice.

The garage’s overheads are built into the pump price – the more you buy, the more you contribute to their fixed costs, on top of their profit margin. I’d consider paying an annual fixed charge to a local garage I used all the time if, in return, I got a lower price per litre.

Guest
Patrick Taylor says:
1 October 2017

When people pay for oil to be delivered , or go to buy cannisters of LPG, I think how fortunate it is that for most of us mains gas is supplied to the property. No need to install a large storage tank which of course deteriorates over time, is generally unsightly, and needs maintenance.

At least with LPG [if you do not have a tank] you can have discreet cannisters though they are pretty heavy to move and they do have to be put somewhere. If you use a lot of gas it can be a rather boring chore.

elgas.com.au/blog/375-how-long-do-45kg-gas-bottles-last

Does one unit price make sense? It certainly does if you have a holiday home, spend most of the time at work, or you use little of either gas or electricty. Going to a single unit pricing model that does include all the maintenance and renewal costs of the distribution system will of course mean that those who stay at home, the elderly, the unemployed, mothers with young children, because of higher usage will all be paying a bigger proportion of the infrastructure costs.

This hardly seems fair given that the distribution system for gas and electric goes pretty much to all urban areas and most people can choose to have them or not, and how much to use. If it costs £100 a year to maintain and connect a property to the Grid then that is the price everyone should pay.

Guest

The standing charge takes no account of whether a home is in an urban area close to others or out in the country, requiring installation and maintenance of more pipes and cables etc. It would be fair for those in built-up areas to pay lower charges.

Guest

Tariffs with zero standing charges are available for those that want them.

Guest

“Taxes” (otherwise government charges), billing and admin, smart meters, take no account of location. The pipes and overhead wires are part of the national distribution grids. However, if you live in an urban area and can find a cheaper tariff, that’s OK. There are so many to choose from – find the one that suits best.

Guest
Kerry says:
3 October 2017

Switched from Eon to Bulb Energy .100% genuinely cheaper renewable energy from a very customer focused company and I am not easily fooled! I am currently on a tight budget like so many other folk and wanted to see if I could make further savings. …. I REALLY did !
Signing up took 3 minutes then Bulb does all the hard work for you. Simples! A big plus for me as I have held back from changing supplier before as I thought it would be a hassle. Believe me, these guys tick every box …. They also pay any exit fees you might incur from switching from your current provider. Now that’s just great.
My bills have already reduced SIGNIFICANTLY and there is definitely a feel good thing going on with this energy provider. Friendly communication from them is amazing.
What more could you want?
Take care and many thanks 🙂

[Sorry Kerry, your comment has been edited to align with our Community Guidelines. Thanks, mods]

Guest

Regrettably my attractive fixed price one year deal with E.ON comes to an end in a couple of weeks. Checking on Which?Switch I avoided the first batch of cheaper suppiiers than my next E.ON offer as they are small and get very poor reviews online. I picked npower, with whom we also have another account that has been no problem.

I phoned E.ON (no delay in answering) to let them know, just in case they had a better deal, but they did not. At the end of the conversation they asked me if I would like them to check the national database to ensure the new supplier would have the correct details, otherwise there could be a delay in switching. It would take just a few minutes. They found an error, and gave me the appropriate MPAN and MPRN numbers. Although these were on my bill, under “Supply details”, it was helpful of them to bother to check.

Guest

You are planning to switch from a supplier with a mediocre customer rating to one that is right at the bottom of the list on the Which? website. Npower has performed poorly for years. Often it is the small to medium size companies that provide better service and the big six energy suppliers provide an example of this.

Tomorrow I will leave e.on for the second time. I hope that they will refund my credit this time because they only did a partial refund when I switched a few years ago. I understand that the smart meters will still work but the display may not. I’ve signed up for two years. Thanks for the reminder to check the MPAN and MPRN numbers.

Guest

I recently switched from npower – they refunded my credit right away.

Guest

What e.on did was to split my account into gas and electricity before I left them, even though the account had always been handled as a single dual fuel account. They refunded the credit balance in one account but not the other. I have been trying to check what’s happening this time but cannot log in because of maintenance work.

Guest

It does seem a little odd Malcolm that you frequently advise others to use Which? Switch for a better energy deal, and yet you have opted for one rated at the bottom of their list?

My son was with NPower last year but they have just increased his monthly DD by another £30. Needless to say he’s not a very happy bunny as he has just paid out for a new condenser CH Boiler.

Guest

Malcolm has also pointed out that you can use Which? Switch to compare prices and then go to the new energy company and make arrangements yourself. I have done this a couple of times and it saves having others contributing to the cost of your free switch. Several years ago we were told that Which? Switch was cheaper than other switching services but I did not find the current cost on the site.

Companies often increase direct debits when customers are well in credit, Beryl. That’s happened to me on numerous occasions.

Guest

I have just entered into a new 2 year fixed rate with OVO with a £5 monthly DD increase. They allow you to increase or decrease your credit balances according to usage so that any credit balance is controlled by the customer and, at the same time, it prevents them from paying the promised interest on it. A smart double positive benefiting both customer and supplier but it only works if T&C’s are complied with!

Guest

I have looked at this, wavechange. I have also been an npower customer in the past, and currently am, and have had no serious issues with them. One contender I nearly went with had a Which? score of 55%, but awful reviews elsewhere, so I think personal experience counts. I see no point in smart meters until, possibly, hourly tariffs arrive and I might then work hard at when we use electricity if it looks worthwhile.

Guest

This is probably because the gas and electricity may well be moved at different times.

Guest

I don’t know why it is “odd”. I have used npower successfully in the past, and they were the better deal when I discard some more iffy companies (in my view). My main intention is to save money. If your energy use is above what is anticipated, the direct debit will be increased. Saves you a possible nasty surprise if your tariff should end, or you choose to move.

Guest

Beryl – I have switched to the same Ovo 2 year tariff. My DD increases from £51 to £54. I did receive some interest from Ovo after I moved home.

Malcolm – I’m not keen to support companies that have a poor reputation for customer service. As you rightly said earlier today, companies can legally treat customers how they like.

Guest

It will depend upon your usage, but for mine the Ovo annual cost would be 15% more. Maybe not for yours. I’d rather save that money.

I reported a very positive and helpful experience with one of the often-maligned “big 6”. It seems a bit negative to turn that into “what can we find to criticise instead”.

Guest

NPower is at the bottom of the Which? customer satisfaction survey and the ‘big six’ continue to perform poorly. I would rather avoid companies that have given poor service to me and people I know.

Guest

Malcolm, you are at liberty to choose the supplier that suits your own needs but you clearly have issues with Which? Switch in opting for their bottom of the list recommendation, which begs the question, why then do you continue to recommend Which? Switch to others?

Guest

In reality Wavechange that’s the only way you can really judge something in this life —self realisation , you are talking to the actual participants in an event and not through possible flawed data .

Guest

From speaking to friends and family I have found people putting up with poor service and encouraged them to try other companies. I’m not just referring to energy suppliers. Brand loyalty seems to be a factor, even when people have had poor experiences with expensive purchases like cars.

Guest

Which?Switch lists all the energy companies’ offers from which you can make your own choice. It is easy to use and, as far as I know, does not exclude any suppliers. That is why I recommend using it to those who have not changed before. I have no issues with the site.

My personal choice is then based on my own experiences; I chose a cheaper tariff from a supplier I have dealt with satisfactorily before. It is the switching site – Which?Switch – I
recommend, not a specific supplier.

Ofgem show up-to-date date on complaints. This may help some make a choice. https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/consumers/energy-supplier-comparison-data/compare-supplier-performance-customer-service

Guest

From the Which? Switch website:

How we get paid?
The Which? group is a not-for-profit social enterprise. We receive a flat commission of between £15 and £45 when you switch energy suppliers using Which? Switch. This is to cover the costs of running our site and goes towards the work that we do campaigning on behalf of all consumers.
Whether we receive commission makes no difference to where the results appear in our tables, meaning you’ll always be able to find the best deals.

I believe commission is unchanged from when we discussed switching services a few years ago and at that time the other services charged the supplier more for switches done via the switching website. I could not find figures on the uSwitch website. 🙁

Why does the commission vary between £15 and £45? That’s a big difference.

Guest

I don’t mind contributing to the cost of the Which?Switch website as, at present, it may be the only one giving all the available deals. Ofgem are likely to permit comparison sites to limit the tariffs they show. I have asked Which>? if their site will continue to show all deals if that option comes into force, and they say they have no plans to change.

Personally, I would have liked Ofgem to run an independent comparison site. I see no need for commercial ones.

Guest

Those that use Which? Switch and other comparison sites to switch (rather than simply for price comparison) are not directly charged for the service and the costs are shared among all customers of the new supplier. That means that those who don’t switch are contributing to the costs of those who do switch via comparison services. These will include vulnerable people and those who are too preoccupied with matters such as illness and family problems. Maybe it would be better if those using switching services paid the costs involved.

Guest

As far as I know, any costs when you switch directly are also spread and not charged to the switcher.

If we want to encourage people to switch, as Which? seem to (as well as I) then imposing a direct charge would be a barrier. Why charge the “vulnerable” to use a switching site to switch?

Guest

My point is that the vulnerable are not switching, yet contributing to the costs of those who use switching services.

Guest

We all contribute to switching costs, whether direct or through sites. Many of those who are poor are still capable of switching, but would you require them to pay an extra charge ?

I would rather see us abolishing subsidised fixed price fixed term tariffs, supported by those on standard variable tariffs. The standard variable tariffs could then be reduced in cost. We’d perhaps then have far fewer annual switches, chasing down the best 1 year offers. I suspect this would benefit the “vulnerable” far more.

Guest

That’s not what I said, Malcolm. Once again, my point is that those who do not switch are contributing to the costs incurred by those who do.

There are a variety of ways that energy pricing could be made fairer. The problem is not the fixed price tariffs but the expensive SVTs, and I don’t see why these should be more expensive.

Guest

So are you suggesting everyone who switches pays the additional cost? This would presumably apply to energy, banking, insurance, as well? I understand in one way the logic, but putting possible financial barriers in the way of people moving would maybe stop some from doing it. And penalising someone financially who decides, for whatever reason (maybe customer service) they want to change a provider seems unfair.

If fixed price tariffs are subsidised by svts – and I have given figures elsewhere that suggest they are – then we could reduce the expensive svts. This would help the many who do not move from svts for a variety of reasons, from inability, inertia or choice.

Guest

Let’s just agree that something needs to be done about expensive SVTs.

Guest

I agree that SVTs could be a little bit less expensive if subsidised fixed price deals were not allowed.

Guest

Of course something needs to be done, but to have a constructive debate about if, and how, energy charging could be improved we need to expose the facts. If, as Ofgem publish, the costs of energy give the profit margin as 4.83%, there seems little scope by real “capping”. Perhaps we mean “subsidy”?.

The bill is made up of wholesale energy 38%, network 26%, environmental 8%, VAT 4.8% and operating costs 17%. There is a misleading figure (I believe) bandied about that we are “overcharged by £1.4 billion”. If profits are just £800 million, how can this be?

Guest

Stop press news !! It has just been announced by the Sottish parliament -Scottish Energy Minister – quote -Fracking cannot and will not take place in Scotland . 4 out of 5 of the parties there agree ( Tory doesn’t agree ) . It will be voted on and made permanent later in the year.

Guest

Here,s another of my -stop-press you can ignore at your leisure – just announced TM revives revives plan to cap ENERGY prices and dont say its NOT relevant to this convo. Its even via the BBC which you all believe in. website says-7 minutes ago. : http://www,bbc.co.uk/news/business-41499483

Guest
Guest

I put a coma after www Wavechange , thanks for the amended URL.