/ Health

Laser eye surgery: what do you see?

Laser eye

You’ll see lots of advertising for laser eye surgery, but what should you know before you decide to go through with it? Our latest undercover investigation finds laser eye clinics failing to clearly explain the risks.

We sent undercover researchers into 18 laser eye clinics across England for their initial consultation and an expert panel rated a third of those visits poor.

Independent clinics, smaller chains and hospital-based providers scored the best, with high street providers coming bottom.

If you’re a Which? member, you can see the best and worst laser eye companies here.

A dim view of laser eye consultations

The most striking problem was the lack of clear verbal information about the risks to the individual: everybody’s eyes are different, and however good the written information you get is, you need to know about any potential issues.

Serious long-term complications are rare but, in extreme cases, patients can have long-term problems, such as severe dry eyes. You could even end up with worse sight, so it’s important you’re aware of this before you commit.

Another problem we identified is a lack of centralised information, such as surgeons’ success rates, to help people make an informed choice. It’s up to the clinics what they reveal to you.

It’s also voluntary for surgeons to undertake the specialist certificate in laser refractive surgery run by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCOphth), and only around half do. In effect, any doctor could carry out these operations, and the clinic decides if they’re competent.

Your views on laser eye surgery

Most people will have a good experience with laser eye surgery and we received many comments along the lines of; ‘I am one happy customer’ and ‘the best thing I ever did’. But we also heard from people who had had ongoing problems, one deeming it an ‘absolute disaster’.

We’re pleased that as a result of last year’s review into cosmetic surgery led by Sir Bruce Keogh, the Royal College of Surgeons will establish committees to review laser eye surgeon professional standards and information for patients. In the meantime we’ve given our findings to the Care Quality Commission.

Have you considered or had laser eye surgery? Did you feel well-informed?

Comments
Debbie says:
16 November 2014

Hi Fred,
I was very worried to hear that after all the information on this website your son is still considering laser eye surgery. I also went to a top consultant and thought I was in safe hands, however I now know that despite the expertise of your surgeon if your eyes are not suitable for the procedure there is nothing they can do to stop the inevitable happening! For the lucky ones laser eye surgery can be a success, but trust me it is not worth the risk! There is not a second that goes by that I wish I had not walked in to the surgeon’s office in November 2012! My eyes were almost intolerant of contact lenses so I went expecting to be told that my eyes were too dry for the procedure, instead I was given no cause for concern, risks were not discussed with me despite the fact that I questioned them about my dry eyes, my worries were simply brushed to one side and I was told that there were excellent drops on the market these days! I was given a detailed booklet on the risks to read on my way out of his office, but as these had not been brought to may attention during the consultation I believed I was safe to proceed. I clearly was not and should have been warned of the increased risk I was taking!
I now live with severe dry eyes that burn constantly, reduced clarity of vision ( feeling like I spend my life looking through dirty contact lenses!) and floaters. I cannot begin to explain what this has done to my once happy life. Going to a top consultant will not guarantee success or the truth! The real risks of laser eye surgery are documented here, I wish I had had the opportunity to read such stories before proceeding with an elective operation which has ruined my eyes and had a devastating effect on my life. I battle through each day, trying so hard to stay positive and strong. Please do not allow your son to take the risk I took, these consultants are very good at glossing over the many, real risks of this surgery.

[This comment has been edited to align with our community guidelines. Thanks, mods]

fred warwick says:
17 November 2014

Hi Debbie

Thank you for this information. May I ask have if you went back to the consultant/hospital that you mentioned before it was edited out, and if so what did they say?

Thank you

Debbie says:
17 November 2014

Hi Fred,
Yes I have returned to Moorfields many times, and to be fair the consultant spent a good deal of time with me, but the damage had been done! There is very little that can be done for dry eyes, and believe me I have tried everything! Nothing alleviates the pain and discomfort. I have tried countless over the counter eye drops, steroid drops, omega eye tablets, doxycycline tablets, heating my eyes with a blephasteam and massaging the glands twice a day, keeping the eyelids clean with baby shampoo or blephasol… the list is endless! The bottom line is that I should not have had the procedure done! Aftercare means nothing if they are not able to put right what went wrong, unfortunately ( and this is something I am trying hard to come to terms with) I will have this problem for the rest of my life.
I was told that I had 20/20 vision, so on their books I may look like a success, however the fact is that I had to strain to make out the letters that were not crisp and sharp as they had once been with my glasses, most of the time my vision is blurred and I am constantly blinking to try to clear it. The optometrist and consultant are very clever in the way they manipulate what you tell them to make it sound as if what your are experiencing is completely normal and that most people would be pleased with the outcome! They basically do not want to admit that the procedure has not been a success. It took many meetings before the consultant finally agreed that he should have turned me away! My question is how many people worldwide are being subjected to laser eye surgery for which they are not suitable? If a top Moorfields surgeon can allow me to proceed with surgery that has permanently damaged my eyes it could happen to anyone! I firmly believe that this surgery should be stopped in its tracks and not offered to the public unless it is the only option left to save your sight!

Hi Debbie,

Did you ever consider going down a legal route?
I got the same reaction from my surgeon and his team and was made to feel that what I was experiencing was the norm and that I ought to be grateful(!) for the outcome.
How are your eyes today?

fred warwick says:
17 November 2014

Thanks Debbie

I have passed your posts to my son to read.

I do so hope something comes along to alleviate your suffering.

Best wishes

Julie says:
17 November 2014

Hello Fred,

Just to add to what Debbie has been telling you, I also have damaged eyes as a result of RLE with Optical Express. I had a retinal detachment (repaired on the NHS) in the left eye followed by further surgery to correct complications from the detachment. I now technically have 20/20 vision, just like Debbie, but I struggle every day with getting my eyes to work together, they’ve been so distorted by the original surgery and then the complications from the detachment. The OE optom failed to recognise the limits of his competence and declared there was nothing wrong with my eyes when in fact, I had a retinal tear in situ. If he had referred me to the local eye hospital for a proper assessment, the tear would have been found long before it became a detachment and it would have been repaired without the damage my eye has now sustained.

The point of my post, though is to say that I saw a refractive specialist privately who warned me off having laser surgery and I am so glad I did. I was due to have laser on my right eye at OE (I still trusted them at this point) but cancelled at the last minute. I owe my mostly decent right eye to his advice. I could have been having similar problem as Debbie had I gone ahead. I am sure you won’t be considering any voluntary eye surgery now, but if you still were, please heed our advice! Wearing glasses is preferable to having your eyes mucked up for life. I now have to wear them most of the time again, so I’ve spent £3,500.00 on having my eyes damaged for life. I so wish I could turn back the clock.

I received this email from an obscure address, with an unsubscribe PO Box number in Athens. Invited to win a prize of laser eye surgery.
Don’t know what all the fuss is about – clearly a professional business. I wonder if its statistics have been audited though? And is the laser eye surgery 2nd prize – with first prize not winning it?

email:
“Make laser eye surgery one of your New Year’s resolutions for 2015.

More than 99% of patients achieve 20/20 vision or better* following surgery and based on a survey of 252,179 patient responses, over 99% of our patients would recommend Optical Express to their friends and family.**

Many treated patients said it was one of the best decisions that they have made in their life. Why not make it yours!

*99.1% of Optical Express patients achieve 20/20 vision or better following laser eye surgery. Based on a study of 336,381 patients, September 2014.
**Based on a study of 252,179 patients, September 2014 “

Emily Merrell says:
12 February 2015

Thank you so much for this information. I think that it is always good to see both sides of the issue. I have been thinking about getting lasik eye surgery for a couple of weeks now. On tv you hear only good things about it. I assumed that there was some risk, as there is in every surgical procedure. This really helps me to know what I’m getting myself into better.

Sharon madigan says:
3 June 2015

My vision is damaged by lasek surgery im now classed disabled nHS have treated me &run tests but can not fix this ..i wasn’t told anything of the dangers i was rushed to fill forms out about 5mins before surgery as they forgot to send me files from what they claim i also had dilated eyes when signing & yes i signed somehow!! As i was under pressure to do so ..suring my procedure something foreign went in my eye too .. Iooks like i cant claim against them after 2years of my solicitor investigating my claim because i signed a contract no matter how or what conditions i signed i have also problems in proving it..NHS wont say that my eyes are damaged by laser as its nhs policies not too?? This i find confusing … I need help july is my cut off dead line .

Written on behalf for sharon

Hi everybody,

After reading all the above comments, I just wanted to ask all the UK residents and in particular those living in London whether anybody would be interested in starting a support network group ? (Debbie and Andy’s girlfriend, I’m not sure if you will visit this site again, but I too went to Moorfields and suffer from post lasek complications that make daily life very difficult.)
Once I started searching on the internet, I found that the States are way ahead in providing invaluable advice, support and information through groups such as vision surgery rehab network:
http://www.visionsurgeryrehab.org/
http://visionsurgeryrehab.evecommunity.com/eve/forums/a/frm/f/6541031211
On these, you’ll find that people share their stories and even meet up informally now and again for support and reassurance that things will get better. Personally, I think it would be so helpful to have a network of people who can immediately relate to what I am going through. Many people have empathy for a person with a broken arm or someone with flu but post laser complications can be a very difficult thing to explain to those who haven’t been through it. As much as my family and friends have shouldered me through the tough times and continue to do so, to know that there is a group of people in the UK who know exactly what to say and know exactly what I am feeling, would be wonderfully comforting.
Anybody interested? And it doesn’t always have to be about depressing stories, we can also talk about what does work, possible solutions, and how to move forward with this debilitating condition.
It would be great to get to a stage where our eyes are no longer our first and last thoughts of the day!
Dry eyes sufferers, go to this website for advice:
http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/forum/community-resources/our-dry-eye-stories/1385-6-months-post-epi-lasek-induced-dry-eyes
Hope to hear from you soon – even if it’s just one person out there!
Take care,
Liza
ps. Sharon, any news on your front about the law suit?

While not involved with lasik I do have Glaucoma and I was told cataract . I was told I had extremely high eye pressure that needed attended to I went to the local hospital where my eyes werent as bad as made out but having checked on US websites as to what would happen if I didnt do something about the high pressure I had laser treatment to my tear ducks as they were blocked allowing the build up in pressure to be perfectly frank holes were “drilled ” in my irises to allow for drainage after the operation my right eye was very sore it took 4 days to die down . Now several weeks later I can now see more clearly so it was a success, before the op with new glasses I got tested in the hospital right eye 6/6 left eye 5/6 but I was told I need to attend in a month to check on the op-ie pressure on the eyes ,as everybody here say there is nothing more precious than your eyesight.

That would be a great idea… I hope you guys managed to start a group

Anonymous says:
26 August 2017

Mr Stevens is a highly reputable surgeon. Before going ahead with my laser eye surgery, I put my whole trust and faith in him especially after reading good reviews about him on various websites.

I never thought that a day would come when I will be one of the few people to submit a bad review about him. But I feel obliged to do so after such a horrific experience, which was in fact quite emotional and life changing.

Mr Stevens may have a high success rate, however, please do be aware that if anything does go wrong (or not as expected), YOU WILL BE LEFT COMPLETELY IN THE DARK with no explanation, acknowledgment or any sympathy.
He would not even acknowledge the fact that you did not get the expected result and would more likely make you feel as if you are a stupid psychotic patient, experiencing things that are unreal! and this is the last thing that any patient wants to go through especially when they are unwell.

Despite going through hell after my laser surgery and having a poor visual outcome, I still put my trust in him. I was very patient, calm and waited for him to give me an explanation. I would not have even submitted such a review if he at least ACKNOWLEDGED the poor outcome. But instead I felt that his attitude completely changed after the operation did not go as expected; he was more rushed, dismissive in my appointments and insisted that things were COMPLETELY fine.

I hope the rest of the refractive surgeons in the ophthalmic field do not lack accountability as Mr Stevens does, and I do hope that no one will have to go through my journey.

Anonymous says:
26 August 2017

Julian Stevens is a highly reputable surgeon. Before going ahead with my laser eye surgery, I put my whole trust and faith in him especially after reading good reviews about him on various websites.

I never thought that a day would come when I will be one of the few people to submit a bad review about him. But I feel obliged to do so after such a horrific experience, which was in fact quite emotional and life changing.

Mr Stevens may have a high success rate, however, please do be aware that if anything does go wrong (or not as expected), YOU WILL BE LEFT COMPLETELY IN THE DARK with no explanation, acknowledgment or any sympathy.
He would not even acknowledge the fact that you did not get the expected result and would more likely make you feel as if you are a stupid psychotic patient, experiencing things that are unreal! and this is the last thing that any patient wants to go through especially when they are unwell.

Despite going through hell after my laser surgery and having a poor visual outcome, I still put my trust in him. I was very patient, calm and waited for him to give me an explanation. I would not have even submitted such a review if he at least ACKNOWLEDGED the poor outcome. But instead I felt that his attitude completely changed after the operation did not go as expected; he was more rushed, dismissive in my appointments and insisted that things were COMPLETELY fine.

I hope the rest of the refractive surgeons in the ophthalmic field do not lack accountability as Mr Stevens does, and I do hope that no one will have to go through my journey.

My Goodness 😲
I’m reading all these posts on here about Optical Express and I can’t believe what I see.
It’s 2019… Have just decided to go for a NLR and now… after reading all these facts related by anyone on here I just don’t know if I have the strength to go ahead with my procedure.
Does anybody this year 2019 or last year 2018 have had a NLR with Optical Express? I would like to know if there is at least one person happy with their surgery and if they have had any problems at all.
I hope to hear some honest answers.

Why are you determined to go to Optical Express after reading all the posts here?
Obviously if you want to go nobody can stop you.
Well you asked for honest answers CD .
I take it you dont like wearing glasses and this is a way to do it .
I too have had both eyes done but in my case it was extremely necessary- stage 3 cataracts and I got it done via the NHS didn’t cost me a penny so I take it you are going to pay for it ?
In that case if you can afford it go for the top surgical operation via a laser its supposed to be “precision ” compared to a scalpel .
Once the anesthetic wears off your eye will be sore for a while , one eye at a time is done in case of complications with a space of a few months between the operations . It took 2 months for my eye to settle down after each op. Some people its quicker ,also some people have a complication where laser treatment is needed to remove a film that builds up .
I got drops to freeze my eyes so was awake during the op , its a bit unnerving, for those of a more nervous disposition you can ask for an injection to put you out .
About 2 % of the public cant go through with it or cant lie still , as the surgeon is working with a microscope you will realise any movement is not on . I will not say how he keeps your eye fixed as its better not to know .

Is it worth it ? your dam tooting its worth it ! never be bothered with cataracts for the rest of your life , great clarity of vision .
Can things go wrong due to each persons type of eye ? yes but its only a couple of percent .

You asked for honesty I have given it –would I go to OE ? only as a cadaver.

You may think I am biased then take this female who got the operation you want and note the date -4-1-2019-
LENS REPLACEMENT – NOT AS STRAIGHT FORWARD AS YOU ARE SOLD!

I had my initial consultations in Newcastle upon Tyne January 2016. I was advised the best treatment would be lens replacement. I was advised that this would be a one off procedure and would last a life time, no deterioration in my sight and no possible development of cataracts. The forms were presented to me to sign and some of the wording I questioned, hey I am not legally qualified! I was told a small percentage of people sometimes needed either eye to be tweeked to sharpen sight slightly but this wasn’t that common. Apart from that everything would be fine. I had the procedure in the Glasgow clinic in March 2016 and was amazed by the immediate results, however during the regular treatments it was apparent I would need the laser procedure to correct my distance eye which was carried out in September 2016. I continued with my regular appointments but kept saying some thing wasn’t right, I was told it could take twelve months for things to settle. Two weeks ago, December 2018, suddenly I was unable to read. I rang the Glasgow office, was un ale to speak to anyone but was advised by the receptionist this was common and I would need a further procedure. Give it a few days and phone back. Having resorted to wear glasses to read over Christmas contacted the NEWCASTLE office for an emergency appointment. It was confirmed that there is a problem with the back of the lens, and it will cost a further £595 for further procedure! So much for being given a life time guaranteed
of never having to wear glasses or have any deterioration! I am now in the dilemma that I urgently need this but stressed about how to pay for this treatment, I lost my brother two months ago and in the process of dealing with all of the related paperwork as well as coming to terms with his sudden death, this is the last thing I need! So are OPTICAL EXPRESS going to keep required a top up of their funds from genuine patients every now and then. I would not recommend them and I am so disappointed with the, you will have the pay and get it done attitude! Would love to hear from others in my situation.

Visited in January 2019. Posted on 04 January 2019

Guess who,s website I got it off ?—–OP.

By the way the forms you sign are a disclaimer in case it all goes wrong but the NHS made me sign one as well so it evens out .