/ Health

It’s time for a revolution in care

With growing concern about the quality of home care, Heléna Herklots, chief executive of Carers UK, is here to explain why there needs to be a revolution in care services.

Caring is a fact of life. At some point in our lives almost all of us will need care or provide care to an ill, older or disabled loved one.

Without the right support, the costs of caring can be high. Over one million people have been forced to give up their jobs or reduce working hours to care, and then often face financial hardship, poor health and isolation as a result.

According to our research at Carers UK, a third of carers who had cut back on working hours or were forced out of work did so because they couldn’t find suitable care services to help them juggle work and care.

The care services they could find were often too expensive, not appropriate or simply not of a good enough quality to trust. And then there’s the care that’s provided in a rush, like the examples of 15 minute appointments from care workers to help someone get out of bed, washed, dressed and given breakfast.

Families bear brunt of care failings

Which? has highlighted serious failings in care services after asking 40 family members to keep a diary of how their cared-for relatives were treated. These diaries included powerful stories of families being let down by unacceptable standards of care.

Faced with this kind of service, along with care workers being untrained, late and sometimes uncaring – families can end up in a cycle of complaint letters and angry phone calls, or just being unable to use the services they desperately need.

A broken home care system

It’s wrong to lay all the blame for this on care workers, many of whom are doing their best in difficult conditions with little support. Many families get great support from care workers. However, poor services are very often the visible result of a social care system starved of the funding it needs to meet growing demand.

As the government cuts councils’ budgets, social services are being asked to deliver more care services to growing numbers of older and disabled people for less. The sums don’t add up. Quality often suffers, but charges for services are also rising and many families are seeing the support they get cut.

Carers are paying the price in their physical and mental health, family finances and often at the cost of their careers. But it is not just families who feel the effect; employers point to increasing numbers of essential staff forced to leave their jobs at the peak of their skills and experience to care for their ageing parents. This is bad for business and bad for the economy – with Age UK estimating the total cost in lost earnings and tax revenues and additional welfare to be £5.3 billion a year.

Alongside fighting for more investment in social care, we need to rethink what care services more broadly look like. It’s time for a revolution in care services to fit with the reality of busy family and working lives and get that triple win we desperately need – for families, for people needing care, and for the economy.

Which? Conversation provides guest spots to external contributors. This is from Heléna Herklots, chief executive of Carers UK – all opinions expressed here are Heléna’s own, not necessarily those of Which?

Comments
Guest
Ally Al-Mufti says:
17 September 2012

Fantastic piece. As a care provider I fully support a care revolution.

Red tape needs to be cut for care homes and there must be more investment to provide the best quality homes and staff.

Carer pay needs to increase, it’s become increasingly difficult to find let alone retain the best staff that have a natural caring ability. For the training and legislation they are required to follow they need the salary to make it all worth it.

Technology must be helped to be introduced into homes to protect not just the residents but staff and visitors from false accusations. So easy for angry families now seeking blame to claim to accuse homes and tarnish their reputation with no proof.

Fully support any revolution and anything I can do to help spread the word please contact me.

Guest
Reg Veg says:
17 September 2012

I work as a carer for an agency and regularly see care homes who will not pay for so much as a pen for thier staff, expect staff to foot the bill for CRB checks, expect staff to work overtime without pay (it’s just 15 minutes, right? yes, 25 minutes every single shift…) and do everything to penny pinch wherever possible. I do 36+ hours a week and still only have a single tunic – the rest of my uniform I’ve supplied myself.

No mouthcare kits for pallitive patients? “they’re too dangerous as the sponges can come off the end”..
Not allowed to change a continence pad? “oh its all dry it’s only a smear”
So ….what did your residents do today? Got up, sat in the lounge, went to bed.
Of course the photo’s on the wall show the residents doing all sorts of things. Just they do them maybe once a year…

..I’m sorry, but if families really want the best for thier relatives it’s time to leave the caring system altogether and take your people home with you – it’ll be just like they’ve become responsible for them. Novel eh?

Bang the revolution drum all day and all night, but you won’t change a thing until
a) caring establishments cease to be allowed to make profits and
b) become generously funded

Of course that doen’t stop workers like me being kicked in the shin every time there’s a problem.

Guest
s thornton says:
24 September 2012

My husband is at home & the carerworkers I have three times a day are great , but the problem here is the same one as the homes. the council put out tenders to do the work,the companies rake in all the profits & the girls who do all the hard work get peanuts .

i have just had my payments put up by an extra £40 pounds which comes to over £168 pounds a week the girls get nothing, why can’.t the councils run the system like a buisness instead of handing over the job to the profiteers

Guest
Angela says:
17 September 2012

I would like to remind both the above posters that Carers Uk is an organisation that supports CARERS..those who care, often 24/7 for a relative and who don’t get paid for doing so.
Someone who cares for a living is a CAREWORKER – big difference.

Many of us do agree about the appalling levels of pay that careworkers receive and also agree that this and many other issues need to change.

In reply to the second poster, the comment about taking people home with us and being responsible for them? We do, and we don’t get to go home at the end of a shift. Many look after young people and children and many look after two relatives at the same time as I did myself until recently. Would you do that and be on call constantly without a break for less than £60 per week?

No? Didn’t think so. Now if I saw a careworker willing to do that that really would be “novel” wouldn’t it?

Guest
paul mcfadden says:
17 September 2012

Great Wee Piece On Care Revolution Written By The Chief Ex Of Carers Uk… Where Ever It’s Family Care ,, Care/Support Worker,, Care In A Hosptial,, Or Even Care At All .. The So Called Care /Support System That Most Of Us Live And Have To Work With.With So Many Failings It Stinks .. When The Revolution Starts Give Me A Shout..

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Angela,

Thanks for your comments and for making the really important distinction between carers and care workers – Carers UK has written a lot of letters to the media and TV programmes over the years making the same point! You also make the crucial point that carers are often in financial hardship as a result of caring for loved ones.

Carers Allowance, the main benefit for carers, is the lowest benefit of its kind. We estimate carers save the Government around £119bn a year with the care they provide yet they are given so little support that they end up in financial hardship.

Heléna

Guest
Sue Mclaren says:
17 September 2012

Your article highlights some of the problems of carers like myself. At age 57 I had to retire early after having looked after Dad with cancer and then mum who was becoming increasingly forgetful and dependant after Dad died. Due to having an ankle injury and having to drive to her house in so much pain I was in tears and after having to cancel our holiday because my brother couldn’t give me a break I then approached a major Care at Home Agency via our local crisis team. I had reached breaking point. I now have help 3 times a day for 15 minute slots. I have never received a penny for my input due to having a small works pension. The carers supervise medications -quite poorly at times with 7 mistakes being made this year ie wrong days opened in Nomad system. They also ensure property is locked and windows closed on the bedtime visit and I have gone up to find windows unlocked. They sometimes don’t read the care plans properly and don’t supervise inhalers correctly for mum through not reading care plans. Because of memory problems mums is supposed to have regular carers but seeing as the throughput is phenomonal in the past year alone she has had a succession of carers and only 2 regulars remain constant. This I must say is from one of the better organisations. Of course I do all the other input on a daily basis and supervise mums baths, organise meals, keep her company, transport her to hospital and doctors appointments. As I write this although I have bronchitis I have still had to attend her twice today and collect Nomads from local pharmacy. The issue for me is isolation and lack of a life and indeed who really cares for carers? The Council pay half the fees so for £256 pm mum has care which can be haphazard and at times substandard. All of her carers are lovely girls but due to low pay, inefficient travel planning, overload or underload of work duties and lack of effective training and understanding (how can they have time to read care plans when they have to rush off to another job to do a “double”) the standards of care aren’t up to my expectations and I am sure lots of other relatives feel the same. Your survey is only the tip of the iceberg and more needs to be done starting with better pay and conditions for the Careworkers.

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Sue,

Your story chimes with the experiences of many carers that we hear from. Whilst caring for a relative can be hugely rewarding, it can also take a big toll on carers. Carers are more likely to have money worries and to be in ill health. A survey we did for Carers Week a few years ago showed that over three quarters of carers had been pushed to breaking point.

Like S Thornton above you make the key point about pay and conditions for care workers – unless we treat care work as a skilled profession and ensure staff are given adequate time, training and pay, then these kind of stories, sometimes shocking, are going to continue. They have done it in other countries, like France, where work to stimulate new services has not only improved families’ access to care but has really boosted care as a profession.

Heléna

Guest
anthony says:
18 September 2012

Been caring for my 34year old son for the last ten years and recently my wife.I had to give up work .Just couldnt cope any longer. Affected myself quite badly having recently had heart problems and Angina. Its unpaid but means caring for them 24/7. Ive only just recently been given a carer to support myself. Only seen them once and that was to tell me I needed some sort of break.That was it. Havent seen them since. God knows Id love a break but where would the money come from and what would happen to my wife and son if I wasnt there. Who would care for them then. Its not going to happen.

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

This is exactly the problem – if carers can’t afford replacement care to take a break, or trust the services then they are going to be unable to take any time off and their health will suffer. Really sorry to hear how hard things are – if you haven’t already been in touch do try and contact our Adviceline to check that you’re getting all the help you can http://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice/directory-of-national-organisations/item/931-carers-uk-advice-line

Heléna

Guest
Scally says:
18 September 2012

I agree that the profit motive can corrupt, and also that competitive tendering is no way to secure value for money, merely to reduce costs and usually qualityn too. A decency threshold wage of at least £7.50 ph should also be paid to all adult staff, and benefits for unpaid carers need to be significantly increased. But even with these reforms, there will still be abuse. Neither the voluntary sector nor the State are immune from employing shoddy staff and lazy managers, nor from the blight of low wages, and then there are some organisations like BUPA that very cleverly shift resources around the organisation, appearing at times to be like as voluntary organistion and at others like a private healthcare provider, whist paying eye-watering salaries to senior staff. Perhaps a new ‘tendering’ criteria should be : what is the salary and benefits differential between the most senior and the most jusion staff in your organistion?

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Guest

A great piece, it’s certainly time for a change. I’m a carer for my wife who has MS, both of us now retired and in our mid 60’s. I had to close my business in 2000 to do the caring bit, the amount of which has increased over this preceeding period from just a couple of hours per day to almost full time.
Eight years ago it was suggested that we approach our local social services to discuss direct payments and although we/I have had some ups and downs on the way, the system works reasonably well and gives us freedom and flexibility to arrange our days.
We have never used a care agency, mainly due to their inflexibility, when they can come, how much time and what they will do etc etc. My wife certainly didn’t want to wait until 10-11 to get up and then have to be in bed by 5pm. We have always used directly employed carers (read PA’s) and prefer to have self employed ones this has resulted in a group of workers who enjoy their job, have fun and stay. The PA’s do the caring bit and take my wife out to socalise, have holidays etc etc – they are almost part of the family and are trusted with her care.
I must say however we have had a couple of false starts, mainly from the mobile carer (the ones who flit from company to company) who are steeped in the agency way of thinking, and did just what they were told and no more, they left very quickly!
Good carers/PA’s can be hard to find, but there is a network out there.
I must say that some social workers have NO idea as to what is required, giving someone 15 minutes to get up wash and toilet is just plain laughable – if you ever get confronted by that decision, ask the worker how long do they take and await thier answer!

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Very interesting to hear your experience of giving up your business to care. Surveys we have carried out suggest that one in every six carers, or around one million people, has already given up work or cut back on their hours to care.

Giving up work to care doesn’t just come at a huge personal cost for the carer, but it also comes at a high price for the economy. Recent analysis carried out by LSE and Age UK suggests that the cost to the economy of people giving up work to care is £5.3 billion. We keep making the case that Government needs to recognise this cost and recognise the wider economic impact of the failing care system.

As in your situation, one of the main reasons for giving up work or reducing hours is seen to be a lack of suitable practical support – around a third of working age carers responding to the survey had given up work to care or reduced their working hours because support services were just not suitable, too expensive or not reliable enough. It is just so wrong to expect people to live their lives according just to what services deliver – like not being able to decide when you get up and go to bed.

Heléna

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Guest

Thanks everyone for sharing your in-depth experiences on this. They are really helpful for our research and work on this issue, even if they are certainly very disheartening. I wish you all well.

Guest
Scally says:
22 September 2012

“they are certainly very disheartening”
Well, there are some bad things that happen, but also some good things. My son is 18, and receives a modest personal budget from social work through the In Control scheme He is currently backpacking around the Netherlands with a friend he made in Finland on a EC funded youth leadership programme last year, staying in Youth Hostels and having a great holiday meeting up with some of the other young folk he met in Finland. He has Downs Syndrome, but with an individual budget he enjoys a great life. It isnt all bad.

Guest
Lizzie867 says:
22 September 2012

I was a home care worker and now I am a social worker who assesses for this care. The truth is that as the number of people needing care in their own homes increases the care staff cannot keep up. It doesn’t matter if my assessment of your needs is brilliant- the care you get at the other end may be so far off the mark it’s unbelieveable. We are now told to push poeple to take direct payments and hire PA’s- which is fine if you have the ability to do this but for someone with dementia this just DOESN’T work- not without the unpaid carer having to do even more work. I feel so much for unpaid carers dealing with awful agencies and agency staff, but the truth is they are paid poorly, expected to use their own phones and cars for very little money (I used to get 20p a call to cover petrol!), not adequately trained and supported, not given sufficent time and autonomy- with a system like this poeple will not get good care. I miss caring but the money would never have been enough to support my family and my stress levels were higher than now and I work in a busy hospital in a much more demanding job. I am not sure where the revolution can come from as what this needs is money and at the moment there just isn’t any.

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Scally’s story shows how personalisation can work – but Lizzie, I agree that there are some people for whom it isn’t right. Our research shows that many carers find direct payments really helpful but others are swamped by the admin and payroll responsibilities because they haven’t been given any support.

Heléna

Guest
Lizzie867 says:
22 September 2012

oh and carers assessments are a joke- the council has a duty to assess but we virtually NEVER provide anything- again no money in the pot for carers.

Profile photo of boycie1946
Guest

You are so right, carers assessments are a joke. Last year, with a change to respite grants, I needed a carer assessment, applied in April, got the grant in November and then only after raising a formal complaint with the County Council.
As a carer you have to be like a dog with a bone, worry it to death, if it doesn’t kill you in the process!

Guest
ManageMyCare says:
24 September 2012

Having worked in Social Care for 17 years and seen the continual deterioration in the quality of services for Older People, I am sad but not at all surprised with the findings of your report.
I have recently launched Manage My Care which is a new initiative. We help people navigate their way through the care system and manage a persons care, rather than family members being left to do it. There is a cost implication but our aim is to help people save money overall and reduce their anxiety and stress. Its radical but at a time when social care accross the country is significantly struggling to cope, alternative services provided by people who really care and want to look after Older People should be considered, before the Big Guns take over.

Guest
Lottie Oxo says:
25 September 2012

I have just left work with a not-for -profit Home Care providing agency after 4 years employment. I have found it impossible to continue to offer what I considered “good enough care”, ie what I would wish for as a user or caring relative, within a system pared to the bone by totally unrealistic time constraints.

The 15 minute care slot is an increasingly popular starting point for cash-strapped Local Authorities. Here are just two of the many examples I experienced : Mr A, bedbound, affected by several strokes and a heart attack, extremely sensitive to being touched. The morning tasks for 2 carers comprised : full body wash, shave, change of bedding, clothing and continence pad, providing breakfast and administering medication. Mrs B, living alone and suffering extreme anxiety resulting from impaired eyesight, dementia, restricted mobility following a badly set broken bone in her foot. The morning tasks for 1 carer comprised : washing, dressing, making breakfast, adminstering medication, making the bed, washing up and leaving the home safe and tidy. The time needed to reassure this lady alone,throughout the visit,took much longer than the entire time allocation.

In such circumstances homecare staff are constantly on the horns of a dilemma, as spending more time with one needy user inevitably makes you later for the next. Every visit seemed to begin with an apology for the delay.Time allowed for travel between calls was a set 5 minutes, whether you were going to the other side of town, or further down the same street. Using one’s own car, a flat rate 50p travel premium covered all calls, however distant. This remained the same throughout the period of my employment, regardless of the price of petrol. The rate of piecework pay also remained the same throughout. Payments for extra time worked consistently had to be fought for, requiring more effort and persistence than doing the work itself. I would be the first to admit that some staff responded to all the above by getting into and out of each call as quickly as possible. This inevitably left more tasks for completion by more careful colleagues.

Local Authorities addressed the issue of “home care cheating” by introducing a “phone in/phone out” system of electronic monitoring of the time spent with users. In the pressured circumstances of a “difficult” call, or a series of such during a shift, it would be quite common to forget to either ring in or out, resulting in a flat rate payment for 15 minutes work, regardless of the actual time scheduled for the task – eg 60 minutes for washing or shopping visits. My initial request for a print out of my electronic monitoring record was granted, allowing me to challenge unfair part payments. Latterly, this facility was refused, so that there was no access to monitoring when and why deductions had been made.

Rotas issued mostly bore no relation to the actual time required to complete tasks and reach the next call. What appeared to be a generous break allowance, on paper, was often a continous stream of work, as the morning schedule bled into the lunchtime schedule. At times of short staffing, rotas were often issued that involved continuous work from before 7am to 2pm and beyond with no break allowance at all.

The terms and conditions of service are appalling in this area of such intimate care provision. Not surprisingly, the rate of turnover is huge, therefore compounding all the possible problems in trying to maintain consistent, good quality care. This was as true of management as front line staff in my experience. During the 4 years of my employment there were no fewer than 7 management changes, so that issues discussed and agreed with one management system became null and void with the next. Staff meetings were poorly Chaired and no Minutes were circulated.

I was required to undertake training for the NVQ Level 2 qualification in social care. This was a revelation in itself, having two components that required staff to demonstrate a facility with mathematical skills. One task involved providing first estimated and then actual costs of carpetting a room of one’s choice and the other involved making various comparisons between one’s own TV viewing habits against some national statistics for TV watching across all age groups.
Driven to borderline paranoia by the ever increasing demands and regularly diminishing returns of the nature of Home Care work, I began to worry that my next 15 minute call might also require me to lay some carpet, for good measure!!

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Your post very powerfully sets out the pressures on care workers and the very difficult choices they are being asked to make every day. In the Government’s Care & Support White Paper setting out future policy on social care, there is a commitment to end the practice of ‘commissioning by the minute’ (where care workers are given those impossible 15 minute slots). But they haven’t said how they are going to put an end to this, and while this is a good aspiration, without extra money to close the deficit in social care funding, local authorities will simply not be able to deliver the good quality care that older, disabled people and those with long-term conditions need – and care workers are going to continue to be asked to complete impossible workloads in very difficult conditions.

Heléna

Guest
Stephen Smith says:
25 September 2012

In common with other correspondents my experience of domestic care for the elderly and infirm is depressing beyond belief and verges on post code lottery, manipulative, near fraudulent, one could go on with descriptors of salami sliced, abject, scurrilous etc. but most importantly it seems for any authorities devoid of responsibility.
My mother was discharged from Poole Hospital after a stroke resulting in at least partial dementia and markedly impaired mobility. The discharge and support put into place by Poole Hospital/Social Services involved what I have come to learn as “brokerage”. In effect they offloaded any responsibility to a charity whose website I initially consulted was partial under construction but in common with so many related websites had pictures of happy healthy smiling faces – a sign of the times and little pragmatic value? In turn the charity put “a contract” out for my mothers care taken up not by a care company but a recruitment company, which subsequently Poole Social Services where unaware of when I called them on one occasion. Said recruitment company failed to attend my mother the first day after her discharge, all the staff I have met complained bitterly about the company. Recently over a weekend said company ceased trading, texting staff I am informed as to their redundancy with no communication to their clients and or nearest relatives, in effect clients could have been left in their beds and faeces. From my standpoint its time the “plebeian conservatives” and so called political masters get a grip but then pigs might fly.

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Guest

What I think is so interesting – and really true of the two pieces of research Which? has done this year (which I have led) – is that virtually everyone agrees that the revolution is needed. Careworkers, agencies, commissioners, charities. But what is going to kick-start it? How much more evidence do we need?

Guest
JOHN BARRY says:
28 September 2012

Some care workers do an excellent job despite working under appallingly exploitative terms and conditions. This exploitation has to be top priority in any reform of the home care system. My 94 year old mother who lived (she died in June) on her own in the North East was visited by a care worker three times a day. The service had been contracted out by the local council to one of the country’s largest private providers of domiciliary care, and the staff were not paid for travel time and could not claim any travel expenses. Given the pittance they were paid and the high costs of running a car or of using public transport, this meant that they were often forced into walking between visits even on cold and wet dark nights in the depths of winter, knowing that none of this time is paid for. Nor could they claim the costs of using their mobile phone to let their clients and office know if there was a problem which was going to make them late for a visit or unable to turn up at all. All of this is in clear breach of how the minimum wage is supposed to work, so why are those providers who exploit care workers in this way not being prosecuted? The councils who sign domiciliary care contracts with private providers must know the conditions under which care workers are required to work, and the Department of Business which oversees the minimum wage should not just be issuing “guidance” about paying travel time. It is time to make an example of one of the large providers and to stop this exploitation of those who do an absolutely essential but undervalued job in enabling large numbers of elderly people to continue living at home with a degree of independence and dignity.

Profile photo of Heléna Herklots
Guest

Thanks to everyone who commented. I also just wanted to point you to the Advice & Information pages of the Carers UK website at http://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice – with information on practical and financial support and details on workplace rights for carers juggling work and care.

Best wishes,

Heléna

Guest
Scally says:
3 October 2012

Looking for solutions that dont involve individual budgets, but are not hopelessy bureaucratic? Perhaps we should be taking more note of the small area commissioning that is a feature of countries like Denmark and Luxemburg – where communities of a few thousand are responsible for housing, social services, pathways, parks and gardens etc; and local primary care, and have control of their own small area budgets. This system of “communes” has a lot to recommend it. Once upon a time, in Scotland, towns like mine with only ten thousand popn. had their own borough council for similar services – localism is surely the way ahead, with democratic control clustered around health centres and similar local services.

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Guest

my mom is 97 and lives in birmingham.
the council careworkers from the local district are fair to excellent , and they are reliable.
for several years there has been relentless pressure from the council to take direct payments or accept agency careworkers. we have some experience of the latter – nowhere near as good and very unreliable – often just didnt turn up. they dont give email addresses and have revenue sharing ‘phone contacts.
direct payments mean we would take on full responsiblity for everything and substantial extra work.
my brother is the daily carer and i deal with major issues.
we are both pensioners, i am in my 70’s.
he gets worn down by the daily slog and my mental health is suffering due to being in permanent conflict mode due to the ongoing struggle with the council.
we suspect many carers have just rolled over and given in to the councils pressure, many carers are elderly, unwell and/or just not up to arguing their case.
all this due to government cuts.

Guest
lemexie says:
8 October 2012

My 75yr old mother-in-law in housebound, disabled and lives alone. Local Authority assessment and contract management is clearly over-stretched. But the home care company has ethics and integrity. Combine that with a family of two sons and 2 daughters within 20 miles who all share a private Facebook site to coordinate support action and I think we are lucky compared to many.

But it has taken a lot of work by myself and my wife to get things to this point because the information and coordination between health and social care is poor. Clearly the budgets are inadequate…but that makes inefficiency inexcusable. With population projections to 2020 and lack of political will to take the tough decision on Dilnott, things will get far worse.

Guest
Adrienne Banks says:
25 November 2012

My very elderly parents who are both in their 90’s will be paying £16.00 an hour for their care. My fatther’s hopsital reablement package has just ended and my mother will be having more care but the charge has gone up from £13.75 and hour to £16.00 and she wasn’t told about this increase. She was also incorrectly assessed = there was a mistake and she was financially assesed on my father’s income and not on her own. In some areas, there are no care charges!

On some occasions the carers have not shown or have come three-quarters of an hour late with no advance phone call. This weekend the carer was sick so a replacement came at 1700 on Saturday evening which is too early for my parents’ evening meal. This emergency carer had not been briefed about what do do and did not know about medicaiton prompt. It was just as well that my sister and I were there to tell her and to serve my parents their evening meal. Today, although another carer did come in the morning and lunchtime, no one came in the evening! Just as well agaoin that my sister and I were there – my father had had a fall immediatley after lunch and falls over at least twice a week. It is a big worry for us especially as we are working full-time. One day last week I had 5 phone calls on my mobile phone about aspects of my parents’ care. It is very stressful. It must been even more so for children of elderly relatives. who live a long way away.

We are also confused about what duties the carers are allowed to perform. This has never satisfactorily been explained.

Guest
Margaret Anderson says:
25 February 2013

What the Government is proposing would not make any difference to Dementia Suffers because they are not considered to be in need of Nursing Care, even though this is a brain condition,
My Mother in Law, who is now 95, and been in a Care Home for 4 years had to first using her savings, then we had to sell her house and in 18months whe will only be left with the monbey she is entitled to be left with, and because we chose to put her in a care Home, which needed a Top Up, when her money has run out social services will mover her. This Care Home has now asked us to provide her with a Wheelchair, because she can no longer walk. The Q>E Hospital, where she was admitted at Christmas (with pneumonia) said she should be in a Nursing Home, but still sent her back to a Residential Home, please tell me where the Care is for our sick, elderly and vunerable Pensions? I would like to know.