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Are you annoyed by the shrinking of Terry’s Chocolate Orange?

Terry's Chocolate Orange

Do you recall the shrinking Creme Egg debacle? Well, Mondelez has been meddling once again. This time with the Terry’s Chocolate Orange, which has shrunk by 10% – and fans are outraged.

The 20-segment orange-shaped ball apparently ‘slimmed down’ in May, shrinking from 175g to 157g, but it’s only now that the British public has woken up to the ‘news’.

In fact, people took to social media in their droves to vent about it:

Mondelez, which makes Terry’s Chocolate Orange, explained that the decision to shrink its products was due to rising costs of ingredients.

Shrinking treats

Supposedly shrinking a product will prevent a price rise, but I still can’t help feeling short changed. I wouldn’t go so far as to say I’m outraged by the meddling, but I understand why some people are.

Adrian Blake, the current Guinness World Record holder for the fastest time to eat a Terry’s Chocolate Orange, pointed out that with each shrunken segment it doesn’t only change the eating experience, but it also makes future challenges to his World Record a bit unfair.

Of course, this won’t be of much irritation for some of you… maybe even many of you. In fact, I hadn’t realised how divided people are over this orange-oil infused treat – a quick poll around my team found that a Terry’s Chocolate Orange may be a bit of a Marmite love/hate thing.

But still, it wouldn’t be the first time a manufacturer has meddled with an ol’ favourite.

So, I’m intrigued, are you annoyed by the shrinking Terry’s Chocolate Orange? Or has one of your favourite food products been meddled with?


Comments
Member

We wish you a tiny Christmas,
With small bites (perhaps some Wispas?)
We think shrinking chocs need litmus
Tests for value this year.

Member

Bad tidings Mondelez bring
Chocolate orange has less zing
We wish you a tiny Christmas
And a choccy with less citrus.

Member

Sleigh bells ring, are you lisn’ing?
Choccies shrink – in their glist’ning
Shiny foil, hides a tale
Of prices – wholesale
It’s tiny little chocies all the way.
____________________________________

Just hear those tills a-jingling while shoppers mingling say ‘Wow!’
Our fav’rit choc’late oranges seem like sandwiches now.
There’s no denying we’ll all be sighing this year
With fewer segments and thus this advent we’ll fear.

Member

While Terry’s once proud Choc’late fruit
Went smaller for this year.
It’s no surprise, yet will it suit
Discerning Christmas cheer?

But Lauren’s topic’s quite astute
She worries for her sweets.
And wonders if the villains’ loot
Is fair, or fare to eat.

They’re not the only ones at fault,
Our sweets change all the time
From Cadbury’s to Nestle’s Vaults
We want our once loved Lime.

Member

Thank you for these poetic and tuneful contributions Ian, please do keep ’em coming 🙂

Member

It looks like the manufacturers of Terry’s Chocolate Orange are coming in for deserved criticism. Poetic justice has a new meaning. 🙂

Member
Patrick Taylor says:
16 October 2016

I am sadly aware that bolting food as a speed record was discouraged under the previous owners of the Guinness book. Sadly it and Which? seem happy to publicise a stupid pursuit with potential harmful consequences. I realise that Mondelez would favour people attempting this stupid feat as it may well bring more revenue.

Incidentally the eventual owners of the Guinness World Record etc etc [whose Accounts are overdue] appears to be a firm called “jim pattison entertainment ltd” which does not exist on the Companies House database.

Perhaps Which? might like to query this with Companies House as we all like accurate records.

Member

I would have thought that the sight of a couple of people literally stuffing their faces would have a deterrent effect.

[Sorry, your comment has been edited to align with our community guidelines https://conversation.which.co.uk/commenting-guidelines/. Thanks, mods.]

Member

Wisdom, hopefully, comes with age. We are aware that the brain is not fully formed until the early 20’s and the last part to develop is the appreciation of consequences. One reason why the young do the silliest things.

One thing is noticeable is the Westminster bubble where development seems to go into reverse for some.

Member
Adrian Blake says:
24 October 2017


[Sorry Adrian, we’ve removed your comment to reflect the moderation on this thread. Thanks, mods.]

Member

It would seem everything is shrinking except for people’s waistlines 🙂

Member

Shrinking sweeties may lead to shrinking bodies. Not a bad thing?

Member

I have not examined the size of these chocolate oranges recently, but have seen them on sale for £1 each. Maybe they should be named chocolate clementines.

Member

Yes, I agree – it does leave a bitter taste in the mouth.

I haven’t consumed a chocolate orange for some time but they seem to have gone from being the size of a tennis ball [or an orange, even] to the size of a ping pong ball during my lifetime. I think the chocolate’s thinner too. How much smaller can things get before the manufacturers have to change the production machinery? – it appalls me to realise that over the years they have been deliberately commissioning production and packaging machinery that could be adjusted at will to alter the sizes and shapes of products without significant expense.

Member

If they buy the Maltesers brand there is scope for continued development and sharing a production line.

Member

Or maybe Hundreds and Thousands?

Member

Or just Hundreds.

Member

A few days ago I was eating a four-finger KitKat bar and thought it was looking somewhat shrunken. The packaging told me it was 41.5 g. I had bought it in a shop on a station concourse and thought it might be a special travel size. I didn’t notice the price because I also bought a magazine, a newspaper and a bottle of water and instructed the self-service machine to stuff its receipt. The next day I was in a large Tesco store and out of curiosity looked at the KitKat bars on display in the sandwich-&-snacks cabinets near the entrance. The same size [41.5 g] bars were on sale at 60p but the shelf label showed them as being 45 g and the unit price was worked out accordingly. I believe the price has stayed the same but the product has shrunk by 3.5 g [7.78%]. I reported the discrepancy to the customer services desk but doubt if any serious notice was taken because no notes were made. I have subsequently checked the Tesco website and a KitKat 4-F 45 g bar is still shown at 60p. It is possible that some old stock is still in the supply chain but since my local store is already selling the smaller size the website cannot be reliable.

Let’s add Nestlé to the hall of shame.

So far as I can recall, good old UK confectionery companies like Cadbury’s, Rowntrees, Mackintosh’s, Fry’s, Terry’s, and others, never did this – the size and appearance of the product was too important to themselves and to their market to interfere with. Any price rises were done honestly and transparently, not through subterfuge that even the retailers are unaware of. Maybe the Quaker tradition among most of the well-known chocolate manufacturers had something to do with it. Commerce has lost all its scruples now and will not hesitate to bamboozle the market in a manner that I regard as unethical.

Member

Scruples – do they come in packs of ten covered in chocolate? 🙂

Member

You should have threatened to also notify trading standards. That seems to focus the minds of the weak or the uncaring.

Member

Many Trading Standards departments don’t want to hear from the public, William. You have to go through Citizens Advice and then have no way of knowing what has happened to your complaint as far as I can see. A very unsatisfactory state of affairs.

Member

Yes, Ian – except there’s only ever nine in the pack.

Member

I tend to write to our county trading standards service. They can’t avoid dealing with it then.

I shall be reporting this to Tesco as well.

Member

Malcolm -why isn’t the fact the CAB is being progressively underfunded at a time when the poor really need their services as well as legal aid being made a lot more expensive for the poor , not because of , the American imported philosophy of – these dam poor are getting too uppity by taking us rich companies to court time they were stamped on –is it ? . have a look at- papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1834129

Member

Duncan – I cannot get your link to work. 🙁 I can see that this refers to articles on the Social Sciences Research Network, which has peer reviewed articles, so could be good quality information. It’s an example of open source publication, where the information is freely available to everyone.

Member

I should have archived the website Wavechange I am having trouble getting back to it but I took the URL directly off the https box at the top not the general one below .There is NO space as shown in my post between pa and pers its all one word I dont know where that came from ?? As soon as I get it I will return the SSRN has a box on their website to input info for look ups . GOT IT Wavechange but it wasnt easy had to change browsers thev URL is EXACTLY as I stated – its- title – under-funded and overwhelmed : The voluntary sector as worker representation in Britain,s individualised industrial relations system and this time I have archived it ! Doesnt sound too right wing Wavechange -20 page PDF file BUT you need to subscribe as I clicked on the link .

Member

Thanks Duncan. Interestingly I see no space on my screen.

Member

The SSRN has its server in Arizona , Wavechange .

Member

Unfortunately, this article is not open source, though many on SSRN are. 🙁

Member

It doesn’t take an IQ of 200 to understand why Wavechange .

Member

Wavechange luckily I have another browser that doesnt censor my search try- citizenadvice.org.uk/about-us/how-citizens-advice-works/media/press-releases/ also -theguardian.com/money/2011/sep/03/citizens-advice-cuts-threaten-vulnerable– be aware the Guardian website attempts to extract HTML5 data which can be used to pinpoint your unique computer settings therebye identifying who you are by correlation elsewhere. Its the latest “cookie ” innovation as everybody has blockers now for them , my security browser puts up a square box telling me so that I can block it , before that the Guardian used to send me adverts. .

Member

Thanks Duncan. I found I had access to the full text because I’m a retired academic. I was interested because it’s about the voluntary sector. If I find anything useful we can discuss it elsewhere. Meanwhile back to chocolate oranges. I might buy one for the sake of research.

Member

Terry (by Twinkle ) – he said he wanted to bring it to me ,my chocolate orange , he said he wouldnt let it out of his sight , but its too late to eat it tonight , please wait at the gate of chocolate heaven for me , Terry — he said he wanted to be close to my side -we had a quarrel I was untrue and eat a Cadbury,s Flake , please wait at the gates of chocolate heaven for me -Terry — he rode into the night holding his orange very tight -accelerated his motorbike , I cried